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Full text of "Annual of the ... annual session of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina"

DUKE 
UNIVERSITY 




DIVINITY SCHOOL 
LIBRARY 



NORTH CAROLINA 

BAPTIST 

ANNUAL 



ONE-HUNDRED 
SEVENTEENTH YEAR 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
WINSTON-SALEM 



1947 



Annual 

of the 

Baptist State Convention 

of 

North Carolina 

One Hundred Seventeenth Annual Session 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Winston-Salem 
November, 1947 



Edited by 

Charles B. Deane 

Recording Secretary 
Rockingham, N. C. 



The Next Session will be held 

November 16-18, 1948 
First Baptist Church, Charlotte 




CARL MACK TOWNSEND 

To Whom This Volume of the Annual is Dedicated 

Jointly with Josiah William Bailey, 

by Order of the Convention 

Born in Fair Bluff, Columbus County, North Carolina. September 29, 1903, 
attended the public schools in Fair Bluff: graduated from Wake Forest College 
in 1924. In 1925-26 he served as principal of Fair Bluff School, and during 1927 
taught at Fruitland. In the years following, graduated from the Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary, and where also he received his Ph.D. degree. One of his 
first pastorates was at Campbellsburg, Ky., and from there he came to Hayes 
Barton Baptist Church in 1933 and thus had served nearly 14 years at the church, 
at the time of his death which occurred in Raleigh, North Carolina on August 
27, 1947, with the interment at his native home, Fair Bluff. Dr. Townsend mar- 
ried Grace Sibyle Brame, of Yazoo City, Miss, who together with two sons, 
Carl Webb, and Timothy Lee, and one daughter, Grace Sibyle, survive. 

Throughout his Raleigh ministry he assumed many civic responsibilities. He 
was at times President of the Raleigh Ministerial Association, chairman of Board 
of Directors Biblical Recorder; trustee Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
chairman of Committee on Removal of Wake Forest College; chairman of the 
Radio Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Carl Townsend was one of the best loved pastors in North Carolina. 





JOSIAH WILLIAM BAILEY 

To Whom This Volume of the Annual is Dedicated 

Jointly with Carl Mack Townsend. 

by Order of the Convention 

Born in Warrenton. Warren County. North Carolina. September 14. 1873: 
moved with his parents to Raleigh. North Carolina in 1877: attended the public 
schools and the Raleigh Male Academy: graduated from Wake Forest College 
in 1893: editor of the Biblical Recorder 1893-1907: Member of the State Board 
of Agriculture 1896-1900: Studied law, and admitted to the North Carolina Bar 
in 1908, and commenced practice in Raleigh: presidential elector in 1908 on 
the ticket of Bryan and Kern; United States Collector of Internal Revenue for 
North Carolina 1913-1921; member of the North Carolina Constitutional Com- 
mission in 1915: trustee of the University of North Carolina 1930; elected as a 
Democrat to the United States Senate in 1930: reelected in 1936 and 1942 and 
served from March 4. 1931. until his death at Raleigh, on December 15, 1946; 
interment in Oakwood Cemetery, North Carolina. 



Div.S. 
CONTENTS t^j^rL 

SECTION PAGE 

Auditor's Report and Financial Statements, Institutions 165 

Baptist Book Store, executives of 5 

Baptist Foundation, directors of 6 

Baptist Hospital, trustees of 6 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, trustees of 7 

Baptist Training Union, executives of 5 

Baptist World Alliance, executives of 12 

Biblical Recorder, directors of 7 

Calendar of Denominational Activities S. B. C, 1948 10 

Campbell College, trustees of 8 

Charity and Children, directory of 7 

Chowan College, trustees of 8 

Council on Christian Education, members of 10 

Committees : 

Allied Church League (7) 30 

Committee on Committees (6) 28 

Enrollment (4 ) 25 

Evangelism (7) 30 

General Board, to report on report of (7) 29 

Historical Commission ( 7 ) 30 

Memorials (7) 30 

Music ( 7 ) 30 

Order of Business (1948) (7) 29 

Place and Preacher (7 ) 29 

Publicity (7 ) 29 

Radio, advisory (7 ) 30 

Resolutions (7) 29 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (7) 30 

Student Center, Chapel Hill (7) 30 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (7) 30 

Constitution 13-22 

Amendment (17) (34) 57 

Convention : 

Dedication of Annual to Carl M. Townsend, Josiah W. Bailey.... (39) 61 

Directory 5 

Associational 269 

Historical Table 271 

Institutions 6-10 

Officers, executive and administrative 5 

Officers elected : 

General Secretary ( 55 ) 69 

President (41 ) 63 

Vice Presidents (41 ) 64 

Recording Secretary (42) 64 

Statistical Secretary (55) 69 

Proceedings of ( 1 ) 25 

Sermon — J. W. Suttle, Shelby (14) 36 

General Board : 

By-Laws 20 

Officers and organizations 5-6 

Report :. 91 

Greetings (13) 36 

Kennedy Home, Superintendent of 7 

Mars Hill College, trustees of 8 

Meredith College, trustees of 9 

Messengers 8fT 

Ministers : 

Winston-Salem area Ministers recognized (8) 33 

New ministers recognized ( 9 ) 33 

Ordained, active in pastorate 289 

Ordained, not active in pastorate 308 

Ministerial Students in colleges and seminaries 279 

Missionaries, North Carolina, on foreign field 278 

Motions and/or Resolutions : 

Re: American Bible Society (67) 73 

Re: Chapel Hill Property (12)-34 (26)-50 

Re: Charlotte Property (12)-35 (27) 51 

Re: Wake Forest Enlargement Campaign 46 

Re: Wake Forest College, disposal of (47) 66 

Prevent Advertising Alcoholic Beverages (68) 74 

Temperance Lessons (36) 57 

"Our Home Goers" 78 

Pastors' Conference: 

Officers 1948 19 

Program 1947 79 



6 Baptist State Convention 

Term Expiring 1949: J. Boyce Brooks, Roxboro; E. S. Elliott, Cherryville; 
Chester Morris, Currituck; R. A. Ellis, Salisbury; Mrs. I. A. Ward, Hertford; 
Tom M. Freeman. Burlington; Lonnie D. Munn, Badin; John W. Lambert, Mount 
Olive; George D. Heaton, Charlotte; Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville; I. B. Hud- 
son, Andrews; O. M. Seigler, Hendersonville. 

Term Expiring 1950: W. W. Jones, Kannapolis; V. Ward Barr, Gastonia; T. E. 
Story, Wilkesboro; Howard G. Dawkins, Kinston; Charles A. Maddry, Wil- 
mington; J. D. Williams, Spindale: James R. Thompson, Greensboro; G. Van 
Stephens, Warsaw; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; W. Perry Crouch, Ashe- 
ville; H. Fletcher Lambert, Leaksville; W. B. Carr, Mooresville. 

Term Expiring 1951: Elbert F. Hardin, Morganton; Charles P. Burchette, Jr., 
Bladenboro; George Watkins, Durham; Isaac Terrell, Oxford; M. O. Owens, Jr., 
Marion; John A. Bivens, Wingate; J. Alton Morris, Murphy; Harry B. Caldwell, 
Greensboro; F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh; Avery M. Church, Winston-Salem; Chas. 

F. Leek, Thomasville; Yates Arledge, Raleigh. 

Executive Committee: Clyde E. Baucom, Chairman; W. E. Stanley, Vice Chair- 
man; John W. Lambert, Secretary; Louis S. Gaines, C. Sylvester Green, Howard 

G. Dawkins, Harry D. Wood, Jr., J. W. Suttle, ex officio. 

Committee on Missions: James B. Turner, Chairman; John W. Lambert, Secre- 
tary; Clyde E. Baucom, John H. Bunn, E. S. Elliott, O. M. Seigler, Tom M. 
Freeman, Lonnie D. Munn, Louis S. Gaines, W. Isaac Terrell, J. D. Williams, 
James R. Thompson, W. W. Jones, Dr. Geo. T. Watkins, Jr., A. M. Church, H. F. 
Lambert. 

Committee on Benevolence: W. E. Stanley, Chairman; Harry D. Wood, Secre- 
tary; A. J. Buckner, R. F. Jarrett, Mrs. I. A. Ward, J. E. Rooker, Jr., Chester 
Morris, F. Orion Mixon, Ira T. Johnston, G. Van Stephens, T. E. Story, W. B. 
Carr, Chas. F. Leek, Chas. P. Burchette, Jr., J. Alton Morris, Elbert F. Hardin. 

Committee on Education: C. Sylvester Green, Chairman; J. Boyce Brooks, 
Secretary; M. O. Owens, Carl L. Ousley, R. A. Ellis, George D. Heaton, Mrs. Paul 
P. Davis, Charles A. Maddry, Ralph A. Herring, V. Ward Barr, I. B. Hudson, 
Howard G. Dawkins, W. Perry Crouch, Harry B. Caldwell, Yates Arledge, John 
A. Bivens. 

IV. THE INSTITUTIONS OF THE CONVENTION 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention, November 12, 1919 

Organized December 15, 1919 

First meeting of Directors, November 17, 1920 

R. D. Beam, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1948: W. F. Marshall, Walnut Cove; W. M. York, Greensboro; 
W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck. 

Term Expiring 1949: J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; W. L. Bennett, Wadesboro; 
E. M. Johnson, Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1950: R. D. Beam, Raleigh; John F. Danielson, Raleigh; E. R. 
Tilly, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1951: N. A. Dunn, Raleigh; M. K. Rand, Durham; J. C. Joyner, 
Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1952: T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; C. E. Hamilton, Winston-Salem; 
W. C. Bandy, Lincolnton. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL - - . 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention of N. C, November 17, 1920 

Chartered December 27, 1922 

Began Operations, May 28, 1923" 

Reid T. Holmes, Administrator , Winston-Salem 

Board of Trustees 

William J. Conrad, Jr., President, Winston-Salem 
Term Expiring 1948: Amos S. Bumgardner, Charlotte; R. E. Earp.Selma; 
Earle James, Elkin; Walter M. Williams, Burlington; Mrs. Otis E. Tucker, Winston- 
Salem; W. J. Stephenson, Wilmington. 

Term Expiring 1949: William J. Conrad, Winston-Salem; Ronald E. Finch, 
Black Mountain; Brantley Booe, Winston-Salem; C. Rush Hamrick, Shelby; 
Norman O. Spikes, Durham; William Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1950: J. E. Broyhill, Lenoir; B. B. Daugherty, Boone; J. B. 
Efird, Charlotte; S. D. Gibson, High Point; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; T. W. 
Fryer, New Bern. 

Term Expiring 1951: Homer Andrews, Burlington; J. G. Raby, Tarboro; 
Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; J. Roy Clifford, Lexington; D. R. Perry, Durham; E. B. 
Denny, Raleigh. 



of North Carolina 7 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 
MILLS HOME 

General Managership began January 12, 1885 

First orphan, Mary Presson, received November 11, 1885 

*Zeno Wall, General Superintendent, Thomasville 

J. D. Fraley, Treasurer, Thomasville 

CHARITY AND CHILDREN 

John Arch McMillan, Editor, Thomasville 

James H. Honeycutt, Plant Superintendent, Thomasville 

Published every Thursday by the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina 

Orphanage Journal of the Baptists of North Carolina 

Founded in 1887 by John H. Mills 

Former Editors 

John H. Mills, July 14, 1887 to July 27, 1888; J. W. Oliver, August 3, 1888 to 

August 24, 1888; John H. Mills, August 31, 1888 to August 30, 1895; Vacant, 

September 6, 1895 to October 4, 1895; Archibald Johnson, October 

11, 1895 to January 10, 1935; John Arch McMillan Associate 

Editor, October 31, 1929 to January 10, 1935. Acting 

Editor January 17, 1935 to May 9, 1935; 

Editor May 16, 1935 — 
Circulation, 36,000 — Price, $1.00 per year 

KENNEDY HOME BRANCH 

Transfer of property, April 26, 1912 
First group admitted, June 5, 1914 
W. C. Reed, Superintendent, Kinston 

Board of Trustees 
Term Expiring 1948: I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill; H. S. Stokes, Winston-Salem; 
Robert A. Mclntyre, Lumberton; Glenn Choate, Salisbury. 

Term Expiring 1949: Howard Penton, Wilmington; Waldo Cheek, Asheboro: 
C. M. Abernathy, Lenoir; H. Cloyd Philpott, Jr., Lexington; S. F. Teague, Raleigh. 
Term Expiring 1950: W. A. Bulluck, Rocky Mount; Jesse A. Jones, Kinston; 
R. B. Culler, High Point; E. E. Wheeler, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1951: Miss Addie Mae Cook, Murphy; Mrs. Bess D. Scott, Char- 
lotte; Mrs. L. C. Holloway, Elkin; Edwin Lanier, Chapel Hill; John M. Elliott, 
Edenton. 

BIBLICAL RECORDER 
L. L. Carpenter, Editor, Raleigh 

Published every Wednesday in Raleigh, as the Journal of the Baptist State 

Convention of North Carolina 

Founded in 1833 by Thomas Meredith in Edenton. Moved to New Bern in 1835, 

then to Raleigh in 1838. Publication suspended in 1841, but resumed in 1843. 

Originally incorporated 1901 and owned by the Biblical Recorder 

Publishing Company until purchased by The Baptist State 

Convention of North Carolina in 1938 

On January 4, 1939 the first issue was published by the Convention. 

Former Editors 

Thomas Meredith, 1833-51; T. W. Tobey, 1851-53; J. J. James, 1854-61; J. D. 

Hufham, 1861-67; J. H. Mills, 1867-73; A. F. Redd and J. D. Hufham, 1873-74; 

C. T. Bailey, 1875-95; Josiah W. Bailey, 1895-1907; C. W. Blanchard, 

1907; Hight C. Moore, 1907-17; Livingston Johnson, 1917-31; J. S. 

Farmer, 1931-38; George W. Paschal, Contributing Editor, 

1938-39; and Acting Editor, 1939; John Calvin Slemp, 

1939-41; Eugene I. Olive, 1941-42; L. L. 

Carpenter, 1942. 
Circulation, 41,261 — Price, $2.00 a year 

Board of Directors 

Wilson Woodcock, Chairman, Greensboro 

Term Expiring 1948: J. S. Hopkins, High Point; G. Carl Lewis, Wilmington; 
E. C. Tatum, Cooleemee; T. Lacy Williams, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1949: E. N. Gardner, Henderson; Lowell F. Sodeman, Clinton; 
Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro; W. W. Finlator, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1950: I. B. Jackson, Rutherfordton; S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn; 
Yancey C. Elliott, Sanford; Carey Dowd, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1951: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest; J. M. Hayes, Winston-Salem; 
L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia. 



•I. G. Greer, resigned as of January 1, 1948 to become Executive Vice Presi- 
dent of the Business Foundation of North Carolina. Chanel Hill. 



8 Baptist State Convention 

V. TRUSTEES OF COLLEGES 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Opened as Buie's Creek Academy, January 5, 1887 

Became Buie's Creek Junior College, August 31, 1926 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell College 

December 17, 1926 

New Charter Campbell College Adopted by Trustees April 7, 1927 

Leslie H. Campbell, President, Buie's Creek 

Board of Trustees 
Dan E. Stewart, Chairman, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1948: James I. Miller, Wilson; W. C. Downing, Fayetteville; 
D. H. Senter, Chalybeate Springs; J. R. Overby, Smithfield; W. C. Lucas, 
Asheboro. 

Term Expiring 1949: W. E. Nichols, Coats; LeRoy Townsend, Lumberton; J. 
Winston Pearce, Durham; Dan E. Stewart, Raleigh; W. M. Page, Fuquay Springs. 

Term Expiring 1950: W. L. McLeod, Norwood; W. D. Barbee, Seaboard; Blanton 
Hartness, Sanford; Herbert B. Taylor, Dunn; W. W. Hutchins, High Point. 

Term Expiring 1951: John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; J. H. Highsmith, Raleigh; 
B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; Harry Carter, Greensboro; Percy H. Wilson, Raleigh. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE* 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute 

October 11, 1848 

First called Chowan Female College Institute in 1851 

First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868 

Became Chowan College, May 17, 1910 

Changed to a Junior College, September 1937 

Board of Trustees 
W. R. Parker, Chairman, Woodland 

Term Expiring 1948: J. M. Duncan, Murfreesboro; Mrs. Sallie Parker, Jackson; 
D. P. Medlin, South Mills; M. W. Grissom, Shiloh; Mrs. Grady Bridges, Conway; 
Lowell K. Powell, Ahoskie. 

Term Expiring 1949: W. D. Boone .Winton; B. H. Ward, Sunbury; E. R. Stew- 
art, Windsor; J. Elliott Ward, Sr., Elizabeth City; W. R. Parker, Woodland; W. T. 
Love, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1950: Charlie Brinkley, Colerain; Hugh Lee, Ahoskie; T. 
Sloane Guy, Gatesville; W. C. Francis, Tyner; Miss Mary Thomas, Cofield; 
Roscoe Wynn, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1951: C. W. Duling, Hertford; R. N. Carroll, Edenton; G. M. 
Singletary, Elizabeth City; G. B. Story, Murfreesboro; Mrs. T. J. Benthall, Mur- 
freesboro; H. D. Raynor, Powellsville. 

GARDNER-WEBB COLLEGE 

Chartered first as Boiling Springs High School, Incorporated, December 2, 1905 

Opened as Boiling Springs Junior College, September 3, 1928 

The name was changed and a new charter granted to Gardner-Webb 

Junior College, Incorporated, June 1942 

Charter amended in conformity to the Constitution of the North Carolina 

Baptist State Convention, November 1946 

Admitted to the North Carolina Baptist State Convention at the Convention 

held in Asheville, November 21, 1946 

Phil L. Elliott, President, Boiling Springs 

Board of Trustees 
J. R. Dover, President, Shelby 

Term Expiring 1948: Mrs. T. R. Padgett, Forest City; Lester O. Hamrick, 
Lattimore; R. E. Price, Rtitherfordton; C. E. Hamrick, Boiling Springs; J. U. 
Rollins, Mooresboro; J. W. Suttle, Shelby; Mrs. Paris Yelton, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1949: Earle Hamrick, Shelby; Selma Webb, Shelby; Wyan W. 
Washburn, Boiling Springs; W. E. Pettit, Forest City; W. B. Hair, Gastonia; 
A. W. McMurray, Shelby; Aaron B. Quinn, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1950: Walter Hicks, Mooresboro; Mrs. O. Max Gardner, Sr., 
Shelby; Margaret Young, Forest City; J. R. Dover, Shelby; J. E. Owens, Hickory; 
Guy Carswell, Charlotte; G. H. Roberts, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1951: Claude Henson, Belmont; J. G. Vann, Raleigh; Horace 
Hammett, Durham; Ed Harrell, Newton; S. L. Lamm, Bryson City; Fred Caldwell, 
Maiden; James Potter, Statesville. 



•Suspended operations and not operated since 1943. 



of North Carolina 



MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First Commencement or Exhibition as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1857 

Chartered Mars Hill College, February 16, 1859 

Opened as Mars Hill Junior College, August 14, 1922 

Hoyt Blackwell, President, Mars Hill 

Board of Trustees 
Grover H. Jones, President, High Point 

Term Expiring 1948: Wm. Marvin Scruggs, Charlotte; W. T. Duckworth, Ashe- 
ville; Mrs. Bertha Carr, Hickory; E. F. Watson, Spruce Pine; W. H. Wray, Gas- 
tonia; Mrs. Rush Stroup, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1949: Oscar R. Mangum, Lenoir; Grover H. Jones, High Point, 
Burette Myers, Statesville; Bruce Sams, Mars Hill; F. W. Jarvis, Spindale; L. M. 
Caldwell, Newton; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville. 

Term Expiring 1950: John A. Bailey, Burlington; J. T. Joyner, Jr., Winston- 
Salem; Charles E. Parker, Franklin; E. C. McCall, Lenoir; W. Locke, Robinson, 
Mars Hill; T. N. Stanback, Salisbury. 

Term Expiring 1951: R. O. Huffman, Morganton; Mrs. C. M. Palmer, Albe- 
marle; A. W. Whitehurst, Marshall; J. E. Gibson, High Point; C. G. Mumford, 
Raleigh; Mrs. George Pennell, Asheville. 

MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of North Carolina, February 27, 1891 

Opened for Students, September 27, 1899 

By Legislative enactment became Baptist University for Women, January 20, 1905 

Became Meredith College by Legislative enactment January 24, 1911 

Carlyle Campbell, President, Raleigh 

Board of Trustees 
LeRoy Martin, President, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1948: Mrs. Foy Johnson Farmer, Raleigh; Z. M. Caveness, 
Raleigh; C. T. Council, Durham; J. Y. Joyner, La Grange; LeRoy Martin, Ra- 
leigh; Mrs. Anna Kitchin Josey, Scotland Neck. 

Term Expiring 1949: Edwin W. Yates, Raleigh; Mrs. Walter Clark, Asheville; 
Carroll Abbott, Elizabeth City; Robert G. Dayton, Raleigh; W. R. Chambers, 
Marion; Carl G. McCraw, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1950: Mrs. H. M. Baker, Lumberton; Mrs. F. D. Lethco, Char- 
lotte; Robert L. Humber, Greenville; Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh; L. E. Spikes, 
Burlington; O. Max Gardner, Jr., Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1951: Rufus Hunter, Raleigh; J. M. Kesler, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. Cooper E. Taylor, Charlotte; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Howard J. Ford, Elkin; 
H. Pat Taylor, Wadesboro. 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute, February 3, 1834 

Chartered as Wake Forest College, December 28, 1838 

Bowman Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College 

Officially opened July 1, 1941 

The First Class of Students began work, September 10, 1941 

Thurman D. Kitchin, President, Wake Forest 

Board of Trustees 
Irving Carlyle, President, Winston-Salem 

Term Expiring 1948: Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro; A. J. Hutchins, Canton; 
John A. Oates, Fayetteville; Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City; Charles C. Holland, 
Statesville; R. P. Holding, Smithfield; B. M. Watkins, Durham; J. C. Watkins, 
Winston-Salem; J. B. Willis, Hamlet; W. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1949: Irving Carlyle, Winston-Salem; G. B. Barefoot, Wilming- 
ton; O. M. Mull, Shelby; Nane Starnes, Asheville, C. W. Weathers, Raleigh; Erick 
Bell, Wilson; C. C. Warren, Charlotte; C. C. Wall, Lexington; Ronald E. Wall, 
Elizabeth City; D. H. Bridger, Bladenboro. 

Term Expiring 1950: C. B. Deane, Rockingham; Horace Easom, Shelby; Carey 
Herring, Fairmont; W. Reid Martin, Raleigh; J. A. McLeod, Dunn; S. A. Burts, 
Gastonia; C. N. Peeler, Charlotte; R. K. Redwine, Mt. Airy; J. Clyde Turner, 
Greensboro. 

Term Expiring 1951: L. R. Varser, Lumberton; J. M. Broughton, Raleigh; 
E. C. Shoe, Taylorsville; J. J. Tarlton, Rutherfordton; Charles H. Jenkins. 
Aulander; John H. Vernon, Burlington; Peyton Ivey, Murphy; W. D. Poe, Oxford; 
O. J. Sikes, Albemarle. 



10 Baptist State Convention 



VI. COUNCIL ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, 1944 
C. Sylvester Green, Chairman, Durham 
Claude F. Gaddy, Executive Secretary, Raleigh 
Term Expiring 1948: R. S. Dickson, Charlotte; Edwin F. Perry, Rockingham. 
Term Expiring 1949: L. M. Massey, Zebulon; J. Glenn Blackburn, Wake Forest. 
Term Expiring 1950: Mrs. Gordon Maddrey, Ahoskie; M. D. Teague, Greens- 
boro. 

Term Expiring 1951: Winfield Blackwell, Winston-Salem; Lloyd Griffin, Raleigh. 

VII. OFFICERS BAPTIST PASTOR'S CONFERENCE 

Officers for 1948 

Guy B. Funderburk, President, Oakboro 

Eph Whisenhunt, Vice President, Clayton 

W. F. Woodall, Secretary, Lenoir 

VIII. RIDGECREST 

Chartered March 1907 

Southern Baptist Convention Summer Assembly Grounds 

Ridgecrest, North Carolina 

GOVERNING BOARD 

Executive Committee Southern Baptist Convention 

Duke K. McCall, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 

Robert Guy, Manager, Ridgecrest 

1948 CALENDAR OF DENOMINATIONAL ACTIVITIES 
SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

First Quarter 
January — 

(1) Cooperative Program Emphasis 

(2) Church Schools of Missions 

(3) The Theological Seminaries 

(4) W.M.U. Training School 

(5) Student Life-Enlistment Day, January 18 

February — 

(1) Baptist World Alliance Sunday, February 1 

(2) Stewardship Sunday, February 8 

(3) Student Evangelistic Week, February 8-14 

(4) Y.W.A. Focus Week, February 8-14 

March — 

(1) Home Missions 

(2) Training Union Study Courses 

(3) W.M.U. Week of Prayer for Home Missions and Annie Armstrong offer- 

ing, March 1-5* 

(4) Southwide Simultaneous Associational Sunday School Meetings, March 9 
(5) Home and Foreign Missions Day in Sunday School and Offering, March 28* 

Second Quarter 
April — 

(1) Relief and Annuity Board (and Offering for the Relief of Aged Ministers)* 

(2) Christian Literature and Church Libraries 

(3) Sunday School Training Courses 

(4) Training Union Youth Week in the Churches, April 4-11 

(5) Intermediate Day, April 25 

May — 

(1) Christian Home Week, May 2-9 

(2) Hospital Day on Mother's Day, May 9 

(3) Sunbeam Focus Week, May 9-15 

(4) W.M.U. Annual meeting, May 16-18 

(5) Southern Baptist Convention, May 19-23 

June — 

(1) Vacation Bible Schools 

(2) Ridgecrest, State Assemblies, and Camps 

(3) Radio — The Baptist Hour 

(4) Christian Education Day (preferably June 27) 



of North Carolina 11 

Third Quarter 

July — 

(1) Ridgecrest, State Assemblies, and Camps 

(2) Student Volunteer Summer Service 

August — 

(1) W.M.U. Young People's Organizations 

(2) Ridgecrest, State Assemblies, and Camps 

(3) G.A. Focus Week, August 8-14 

September — 

(1) Southern Baptist Foundation 

(2) Training Union Study Courses 

(3) W.M.U. Season of Prayer for State Missions and Offering (as promoted 

by the state W.M.U.) 

Fourth Quarter 
October — 

(1) Student Join-the-Church Day (Sunday following college opening) 

(2) Sunday School Training Courses 

(3) Layman's Day, October 10 

(4) State Mission Day in Sunday School and Offering, October 24 (as pro- 

moted by the states) 

November — 

(1) Every -Member Canvass 

(2) Church Schools of Missions and Stewardship 

(3) State Papers and Missionary Magazines 

(4) Orphanage Day and Offering (as promoted by the states) 

(5) R.A. Focus Week, November 7-13 

December — 

(1) Foreign Missions 

(2) Every-Member Canvass (completed) 

(3) W.M.U. Week of Prayer for Foreign Missions and Lottie Moon Christmas 

Offering, November 29-December 3* 

(4) Southwide Simultaneous Associational Training Union Meetings, De- 

cember 6 

(5) Student Night at Christmas, December 26 

NOTE. — At some time during the year, emphasize the service to all types of 
Southern Baptist work, at home and abroad, which the American Bible Society 
renders by supplying the Scriptures, without profit and often below cost, and 
explain its need for contributions from the churches. 

IX. DIRECTORY OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The Convention was organized May 8, 1845, and held its first meeting in Augusta, 

Ga. 
The 1942 Convention was held in San Antonia, Texas. 

The 1943, 1944, 1945 Conventions were deferred by Executive Committee in view 

of war restrictions on travel. 
The 1946 Convention was held in Miami, Fla. 

The 1947 Convention was held in St. Louis, Mo., May 7-11, 1947. 
The 1948 Convention will be held in Memphis, Tenn. May 19-23, 1948. 

Officers of the Convention: 

President: Louie D. Newton, Atlanta, Ga. 

First Vice President: C. Oscar Johnson, St. Louis, Mo. 

Second Vice President: Thomas Vaden McCaul, Gainesville, Florida. 

Secretary: Porter Routh, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary: Joe W. Burton, Nashville, Tenn. 

Boards of the Convention: 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., M. T. Rankin, Executive Secretary 
North Carolina members: Ralph A Herring, Winston-Salem; R. K. 
Benfield, Hickory. 

Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga., J. B. Lawrence, Executive Secretary- 
Treasurer. North Carolina members: J. B. Turner, Laurinburg- J Roy 
Clifford, Lexington. 

Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary 
North Carolina members: Zeno Wall, Thomasville; J. S. Hopkins High 
Point. 

Relief and Annuity Board, Dallas, Texas, Walter R. Alexander, Executive 
Secretary. North Carolina members: F. O. Mixon, Raleigh- L S Gaines 
Fayetteville". 



"These offerings have been approved by the Southern Baptist Convention. 



12 Baptist State Convention 

Institutions of the Convention: 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Ellis A. Fuller, President, Louisville, 
Ky. North Carolina members of Board of Trustees: J. Clyde Turner, 
Greensboro: William Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, E. D. Head, President, Semi- 
nary Hill, Texas. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: A. P. 
Stephens, Lumberton. 

New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, Roland Q. Leavell, President, 
New Orleans, La. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: Wilson 
W. Woodcock, Greensboro. 

American Baptist Theological Seminary, E. P. Alldredge, Chairman, Nash- 
ville, Tenn.; H. H. Stembridge, Jr., Forest City. 

Southern Baptist Hospital, Louis J. Bristow, Superintendent, New Orleans, 
La. North Carolina director: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest. 

Commissions of the Convention: 

Education Commission — Chas. D. Johnson, Chairman, Waco, Texas. North 

Carolina member: C. Sylvester Green, Durham. 
Social Service Commission — J. B. Weatherspoon, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. 

North Carolina members: I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill; George D. Heaton, 

Charlotte: Santford Martin, Winston-Salem. 
Radio: S. F. Lowe, Director, Atlanta, Ga. North Carolina Member: 
Historical Society — W. O. Carver, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. North Carolina 

member: G. W. Paschal, Wake Forest. 

Standing Committees of the Convention: 

Baptist Brotherhood of the South, Lawson H. Cooke, General Secretary, 
Memphis, Tenn. North Carolina member: J. M. Broughton, Raleigh. 

Executive Committee, Duke K. McCall, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. 
North Carolina members: Perry Crouch, Asheville, and C. C. Warren, 
Charlotte. 

Order of Business next Session, B. Locke Davis, Chairman, Anniston, Ala- 
bama. North Carolina Member: Charles A. Maddry, Wilmington. 

Special Committees of the Convention to Report in 1948: 
(North Carolina Member.) 
Baptist Papers: L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh. 
Baptist Papers Circulation Campaign: 

Calendar of Coordinated Denominational Activities: None. 
Evangelism: J. C. Canipe, Hendersonville. 
Public Relations: J. M. Broughton, Raleigh. 
W.M.U. Work: Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh. 
To Study Field of Theological Education: None. 
Church Organizations: Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh. 

Inter-Convention Committee on Negro Ministerial Education: None. 
To Consider Kansas Application: R. K. Redwine, Mount Airy. 
Western Assembly: None. 

To Discuss "Common Problems" with Northern Baptists : None. 
Boards: Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson. 

Officers of the Woman's Missionary Union: 

Organized May 14, 1888, as auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention. 
Headquarters, Birmingham, Alabama. Miss Kathleen Mallory, Executive 
Secretary. North Carolina President, Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh. 

X. BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE 

Headquarters: 4 Southampton Row, London W. C. I., England 

Organized in London, England, July 11-19, 1905 
Last Session, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 29-August 3, 1947 
Next Session: Not set. 

C. Oscar Johnson, President, St. Louis, Mo. 
Dr. A. T. Orhn, General Secretary, 1628-16th St., N. W., Washington 



CONSTITUTION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the permanent 
guidance and control of its activities, this body does adopt the fol- 
lowing as its Constitution, to wit: 

ARTICLE I. Name 

The name of this bady is the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina. 

ARTICLE II. Purposes 

The object of this Convention shall be to promote missions, educa- 
tion, social service, the distribution of the Bible and sound religious 
literature, and to cooperate with the work of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. 

ARTICLE III. Composition 

The Convention shall be composed of (1) two messengers from 
each cooperating church, and one additional messenger from each 
church for every hundred members or major fraction thereof, be- 
yond the first one hundred members; provided, that no church shall 
be entitled to more than ten messengers. No one shall be a mes- 
senger who is not a member of a church cooperating with the Con- 
vention, and messengers must be duly elected by their churches, 
a cooperating church shall be one that supports any object of the 
Convention; and (2) the officers of the Convention, the members 
of the General Board, the editor of the Biblical Recorder, and the 
President of the Woman's Missionary Union. 

ARTICLE IV. Meetings 

The Convention shall convene annually on Tuesday after the 
second Sunday in November. In case of emergency the General 
Board is empowered to change the time or place of meeting, cancel 
the sessions of the Convention, or call a special meeting by a vote 
of two-thirds of the members present when the vote is taken. 

ARTICLE V. Officers 

The officers of the Convention shall be a President, a First Vice 
President a Second Vice President, a Third Vice President, a Record- 
ing Secretary, a Statistical Secretary, a General Secretary, a Treas- 
urer, who at the discretion of the Convention may be the General 
Secretary and three Trustees. The terms of all officers shall com- 
mence at the conclusion of the annual session at which they are 
elected and continue until the close of the next Convention. The 
President or Vice Presidents may not be elected for more than two 
consecutive terms. All officers shall be elected on the second day 



14 Baptist State Convention 

of the annual Convention. A vacancy in any office occurring between 
sessions of the Convention may be filled by the General Board. 

ARTICLE VI. Trustees of the Convention 

The Convention shall have three trustees who shall serve for one 
year and shall hold title to the property of the Convention and con- 
vey and use the same as directed by the Convention or its General 
Board. They shall execute obligations only in behalf of and as 
ordered by the Convention. They shall have the powers granted to 
trustees of religious societies by the laws of the State of North 
Carolina, but subject always to the limitations imposed by this Con- 
stitution and by action of the Convention or its General Board. 
They shall require the Treasurer of the Convention to give suit- 
able bond, with corporate security and in adequate amount as 
determined by the General Board, and they shall cause such bonds 
to be safely kept. Failure on the part of the Treasurer to main- 
tain such a bond in force for as long a period as ten days shall 
authorize the Trustees to remove him from office and fill the vacancy 
at once. The Trustees shall make full, detailed reports to the 
annual sessions of the Convention and at other times if requested 
by the General Board. They shall safely keep the seal of the Con- 
vention and affix it only as authorized by the Convention or its 
General Board. The seal shall be circular in form and shall bear 
the words: 

"Trustees of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, In- 
corporated 1893. 

SEAL." 

The Trustees shall keep full minutes of all their meetings and 
preserve the same in permanent forms. They shall elect their own 
Chairman and Secretary. Any vacancy occuring in their member- 
ship between sessions of the Convention shall be filled by the General 
Board. 

ARTICLE VII. The General Board of the Convention 

The General Board shall consist of the President and the Record- 
ing Secretary of the Convention, ex officio, and forty-eight members 
from the State at large. One-fourth of the members shall be elected 
each year. The members of the Board shall be elected by the Con- 
vention for terms of four years. The retiring members of the 
Board shall be ineligible for reelection until the following meeting 
of the Convention. No one in the employment for pay of any in- 
stitution of the Convention shall be eligible for membership on the 
Board except as an ex officio member. The General Board shall have 
the power of the Convention in the interim between sessions of the 
Convention, and it shall have general supervision of all agencies and 
institutions fostered and supported by the Convention. The Board 
shall have power to fill vacancies in its own membership, occurring 
between sessions of the Convention. 



of North Carolina 15 

ARTICLE VIII. Agencies of the Convention 

Section A. Trustees of the Convention's Institutions. 
The charter of every institution owned or supported in whole 
or in part by the Convention shall contain the following provisions: 

Subsection 1. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
shall elect the trustees and directors of said corporation for terms 
of four years except that the Directors of the Baptist Foundation 
shall be elected for terms of five years. At the first election by 
the Convention one-fourth of the board of trustees shall be elected 
to serve for one year, one-fourth for two years, one-fourth for three 
years, and the remaining one-fourth for four years. At each sub- 
sequent regular annual session of the Convention one-fourth of the 
Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be elected by the 
Convention to succeed the members of said Board retiring, the re- 
tiring members being ineligible for reelection until one year has 
elapsed. 

* Any person who has served not longer than one year of any 
unexpired term is eligible to succeed himself. 

Subsec. 2. The trustees shall be responsible to the Convention 
for the operation of its institutions in accordance with Baptist prin- 
ciples; full report of all work done and undertaken shall be reported 
to the Convention; no change of policy shall be made without secur- 
ing the prior approval of the Convention or its General Board; 
no program shall be inaugurated which might involve the Conven- 
tion directly or indirectly, in a debt, without securing the prior ap- 
proval of the Convention. 

Subsec. 3. The members of the Board of Trustees of said corpora- 
tion shall be residents of the State of North Carolina and members 
of churches cooperating with the Convention. 

Subsec. 4. Removal of a member of a Board of Trustees. If for 
any reason a member of a Board shall cease to be a member of a 
church cooperating with the Convention or shall remove his resi- 
dence from the State, his membership on any Board shall be 
thereby terminated. Any vacancy on the Board shall be filled by 
the remaining members until the next regular annual session of the 
Convention, and the Convention shall at its next regular annual 
session fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. The Board of 
Trustees of said corporation by affirmative vote of three-fourths of 
the entire membership given in regular annual meeting or in a 
special meeting called for the purpose, shall have the power to re- 
move from office any trustee of such corporation for cause con- 
sidered sufficient by such Board, but only after reasonable notice 
to such trustee and opportunity to be heard by the Board. The Con- 
vention shall have the right to remove any trustee for cause con- 
sidered sufficient by the Convention, but only after reasonable notice 
to such trustee and opportunity for him to be heard by the Con- 



*Constitution Amended, See Section 17. 



16 Baptist State Convention 

vention. Notice of such contemplated action and hearing by the 
Convention may be given by the Executive Committee of the 
General Board of the Convention. 

Subsec. 5. The trustees of the institutions and agencies of the 
Convention shall be nominated by the Committee to Nominate 
Trustees of the Convention, its institutions and General Board. The 
trustees of all institutions owned and supported by the Convention 
shall make an annual report to the above committee of all vacancies 
to be filled. 

Sec. B. Council on Christian Education. 

The Council shall be composed of the following: (1) The members 
of the Education Committee of the General Board; (2) eight mem- 
bers at large, to be elected by the Convention, one-fourth annually; 
(3) the President and the Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees and the President and Dean of each of 
the educational institutions which may at the time be receiving 
funds from the Convention; (4) the President of the State Con- 
vention, the President of the Woman's Missionary Union, the Pres- 
ident of the General Board, the General Secretary of the Conven- 
tion. The Chairman of the Committee on Education of the General 
Board shall be Chairman of the Council, and the President of the 
Woman's Missionary Union shall be Vice Chairman. 

No member of the Council who occupies a salaried position with 
the Convention or its institutions or its auxiliary shall have a vote 
on appropriations that may be made to the institutions; and all 
appropriations agreed upon shall be subject to the approval of the 
General Board. The duties and powers of the Council shall be 
fixed by the By-Laws of the Convention. 

Sec. C. Baptist Foundation. 

This agency of the Convention was authorized and organized in 
1919, and is incorporated under the Laws of the State of North 
Carolina. Its directors are elected for five-year terms, one-fifth of 
the number annually by the Convention. It was organized and is 
maintained for the purpose of receiving and holding and administer- 
ing donations of money and property which charitable-minded per- 
sons may desire to leave to it from time to time. 

ARTICLE IX. Concerning Debts 

Section A. The General Board shall have authority to borrow 
money in anticipation of current revenue, provided that any unpaid 
balance of such borrowing at the end of the current fiscal year shall 
be provided for in and made a part of the budget for the subsequent 
fiscal year. 

Sec B. No institution or agency of the Convention shall en- 
cumber its property or change its status with respect to the Con- 
vention without authority from the Convention. Institutions and 



of North Carolina 17 

agencies of the Convention, subject to the approval of the General 
Board, shall have authority to borrow money in anticipation of 
current revenue, provided that any unpaid balance of such bor- 
rowing at the end of the current fiscal year shall be provided for 
in and made a part of the budget for the subsequent current year. 

Sec. C. All borrowing by the Convention for its own use, or for 
its institutions or agencies, or borrowings by any institution or 
agency of the Convention, the payment of which would require an 
extension of time beyond the close of the subsequent fiscal year, 
shall be authorized only on the following terms and conditions: 

(1) Notice of any and all contemplated borowings shall appear 
in the Biblical Recorder in three separate issues in advance of the 
meeting of the Convention during which it is proposed that action 
be taken. 

(2) Any and all resolutions which propose the borrowing of money 
shall set forth all pertinent facts and a definite schedule for repay- 
ment. They shall be considered by the Committee on Resolutions, 
or by a special committee, and shall be voted on by the Convention 
on two separate days while the Convention is in session; and on 
each day they must receive the votes of at least three-fifths of the 
messengers present when the vote is taken, and such vote shall be 
recorded in the minutes of the Convention. 

ARTICLE X. Miscellaneous 

Section A. The Convention's fiscal year shall close on Decem- 
ber 31. 

Sec. B. The members of the Boards of the Convention and its 
institutions and agencies shall be distributed as widely as practicable. 
The term of office of a trustee who has not resigned, died, become 
disqualified, or been removed shall not expire until his successor 
shall have been duly elected and qualified. No individual shall 
serve on any Board, or institution, who is at the same time holding 
membership on any other Board or institution. Not more than three 
members of any Board of any institution or agency supported wholly 
or in part by the Convention shall be members of the same church. 

Sec C. Individuals, churches and associations, or others desiring 
the assistance and cooperation of the Baptists of the Convention 
in any work not already fostered by the Convention shall present 
such project to the agency under which it should be properly placed. 
If the agency fails or refuses to approve it, it may be presented to 
the Convention under miscellaneous business or as a special order. 

Sec D. Neither the Convention, nor any institution or agency, 
owned or supported in whole or in part by the Convention, shall 
accept or receive, directly or indirectly, any gift, grant, or aid from 
the Federal or State governments or any governmental agency, 



18 Baptist State Convention 

except for definite and full services rendered by the institution or 
agency and by and with the approval of the Convention or its 
General Board. 

ARTICLE XI. Woman's Missionary Union 

The Woman's Missionary Union of North Carolina is recognized 
as an auxiliary of this Convention whose accomplishments and poten- 
tialities in good works are appreciated as being of immeasurable 
power to our Christian cause. 

ARTICLE XII. Amendments 

This Constitution may be changed or amended on the second day 
of any annual session of the Convention by a two-thirds vote of the 
registered messengers present when the vote is taken provided, 
that notice of the contemplated change shall have been announced 
on or before the first day of the Convention. 

ARTICLE XIII. Validate 

The adoption of this new Constitution shall not invalidate any 
action validly taken by or in behalf of the Convention or any of its 
institutions or agencies prior to the date this new Constitution be- 
comes effective. 

BY-LAWS 

The work of the Convention shall be governed by the following 
by-laws : 

ARTICLE I. Duties of Officers of the Convention 

Section A. The President shall preside over the deliberations 
of the Convention and discharge such other duties as are imposed 
upon him by the Convention or as are incumbent on the presiding 
officer of a deliberative body. He shall in advance of the meeting 
of the Convention appoint a Committee on Enrollement consisting 
of nine members, and a Committee on Committees consisting of 
fifteen members. He may appoint other committees when so directed 
by the body. In case of his death or incapacity to serve the Vice 
Presidents shall succeed him in the order of their rank. 

Sec B. The Recording Secretary shall record and preserve 
the proceedings of the Convention and shall have the same printed 
and distributed. 

Sec C. The General Secretary of the Convention shall promote 
the whole program of the Convention, including Missions, Education 
and Social Service, and may serve as adviser to all the institutions, 
agencies and committees of the Convention. He shall work under 
the direction of and be subject to the authority of the General 
Eoard; and shall have administrative supervision of such work as 
shall be assigned to him by the Convention or its General Board. 



of North Carolina 19 

Sec. D. The Treasurer shall receive all funds sent him for the 
objects of the Convention, make acknowledgment of the same once 
a month in the Biblical Recorder, give bond to the Trustees of the 
Convention in such amount as the General Board may determine 
for the faithful performance of his duties. The Treasurer shall sign 
all checks, which shall be countersigned by the General Secretary, 
or in case the offices of Secretary and Treasurer shall be filled by 
the same person, then all checks shall be signed by the bonded 
bookkeeper, or by any other bonded officer or employee at the 
discretion of the Board, which shall indicate its decision and will 
by filing formal resolutions with the depository bank; and such 
checks shall be countersigned by the General Secretary. 

He shall forward at least once a month all contributions to their 
destinations. He shall make an annual report of his receipts and 
disbursements which shall be published in the minutes of the 
Convention, and upon retiring from his office, he shall deliver to his 
successor all money, papers, books and other property belonging 
thereto. 

ARTICLE II. Duties of Committees 

The committees of the Convention shall be divided into three 
categories: 

Section A. Those appointed by the President in advance of the 
Convention : 

Subsection 1. A Committee on Enrollment consisting of nine 
members whose duties it shall be to provide registration cards for 
messengers and visitors and have them in a suitable place several 
hours before the meeting of the Convention. This committee shall 
make a report to the assembled messengers upon the call of the 
President, and shall serve as a committee on credentials. 

Subsec 2. A Committee on Committees whose duty it shall be to 
name the following committees, and such other committees as may 
be assigned to it. 

Sec B. Those named to report at the session of the Convention 
by which they are appointed: 

Subsec 1. Committee on Resolutions, consisting of thirteen. 

Subsec 2. Committee to report on the General Board's report, 
consisting of twenty-three. 

Subsec 3. Committee on Place and Preacher for the next Con- 
vention, consisting of nine. 

Sec C. Those named to report at a subsequent session of the 
Convention : 

Subsec 1. Committee on Order of Business, consisting of nine. 

Subsec 2. Committee to nominate the members of the General 
Board and trustees and directors of the institutions and agencies of 
the Convention, consisting of fifteen. 



20 Baptist State Convention 

Subsec. 3. Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness, 
consisting of fifteen. 

Subsec. 4. Historical Commission, consisting of thirteen. 
Subsec 5. Committee on Publicity, consisting of five. 
Subsec 6. Committee on Memorials, consisting of five. 

ARTICLE III. The General Board 

Section A. Its Organization. 

Subsection 1. Meetings. The General Board shall meet in regular 
sessions in January and June of each year, and in cases of emergency, 
at the call of the General Secretary and the President of the Board, 
or of any five members. 

Subsec 2. Officers and Department Heads. At the January meet- 
ing of the Board, there shall be elected the following officers who 
shall serve for one year, and until their successors are elected and 
qualified; a President, a Vice President, and a Recording Secretary. 
At the same time, the Board shall elect all department heads, and 
such other assistants as may from time to time be deemed neces- 
sary, and shall fix the compensation of its secretaries and other 
employees, and all salaried officers of the Convention. 

Subsec 3. Committees at the January meeting of the Board 
an Executive Committee of eight members shall be elected and the 
membership of the Board shall be divided into three committees: 
(1) Committee on Missions; (2) Committee on Education; (3) Com- 
mittee on Beneficences. 

Sec B. Powers and Duties of General Board. 

Subsec 1. Charge of Work. The General Board shall have 
charge and control of all work of the Convention, including Missions, 
Education, Beneficences, and all other general activities, in the 
iterim between sessions of the Convention, except those activities 
committed specifically by charter to the Boards of Trustees of its 
institutions and agencies. It shall have the power to act for the 
Convention in the interim between sessions of the Convention; and 
any action taken during the interim shall be binding on the Con- 
vention and reported fully to the Convention at its next session. 
It shall make and approve all appropriations. It shall have no 
power to contravene any action of the Convention nor to launch 
any new institution. It may provide for the expansion of any phase 
of work which its income and resources may make possible. It 
shall have the responsibility of bringing to the Convention for its 
Consideration recommendations concerning any phase of the work 
that is being done or that should be undertaken in order that the 
Convention may have an over-all picture of the total program of 
North Carolina Missionary Baptists. 

Subsec 2. Reports. The General Board shall make a full report 
to the Convention of its activities during the year, including the 
work done by the departments of Missions, Education, and Benefi- 



of North Carolina 21 

cencies and all other general activities. The Board shall have its 
report printed and ready for distribution at the first session of the 
Convention, including reports from Educational Institutions, Hos- 
pitals, Orphanages, Baptist Foundation, Educational Council, and 
all other agencies of the Convention. 

Subsec. 3. Allocation of Funds. The General Board shall recom- 
mend to the Convention the percentage of undesignated gifts which 
each object of the Convention shall receive, both State and South- 
ern Baptist Convention objects. 

Subsec. 4. Audits. The General Board shall employ a certified 
public accountant each year to make a complete audit of the books 
and accounts of the treasurer and bookkeeping departments and re- 
port to the General Board and shall have it published in the Minutes 
of the Convention. 

ARTICLE IV. Council on Christian Education 

Section A. Powers. 

In the interim between the meetings of the General Board the 
Council shall have oversight of the entire program of education in 
the colleges and schools of the Convention. 

Sec. B. Duties. The duties of the Council shall be as follows: 

(1) It shall devise ways and means for the proper correlation 
of the work and programs in the several educational institutions 
supported by the Convention. 

(2) It shall study the needs of the institutions and their ability 
to meet these needs, and upon the basis of its findings shall recom- 
mend to the General Board allocations to the institutions of such 
funds as may be made available by the Convention or the General 
Board for Christian education. 

(3) It shall formulate and promote plans for increasing the interest 
in and the support of these institutions and shall make reports in 
detail to the General Board upon all its work and findings. 

Sec C. Executive Secretary. 

The Council may in its discretion and out of funds provided by 
the Convention or its General Board for Christian education, em- 
ploy an Executive Secretary and such other assistance as may be 
deemed necessary. 

Sec D. Meetings. 

The Council shall meet at the call of the Chairman, at least three 
times during the Convention year; it may meet in special session 
at the call of the Chairman and Executive Secretary, or any five 
members. 



22 Baptist State Convention 

ARTICLE V. Convention Procedure 

Section A. Rules. 

The Rules of Order for the Convention shall be those laid down 
in Kerfoot's "Parliamentary Law," but in cases where the meaning 
may not be clear the President shall exercise his discretion, subject 
to appeal to the Convention. 

Sec. B. Resolutions. 

All resolutions presented to the Convention shall be referred to 
the Committee on Resolutions, except that by a two-thirds vote of 
the messengers present on the first or second day of the Convention, 
the rules may be suspended and a resolution be taken up for im- 
mediate consideration. 

Sec. C. Recommendations in Reports. 

Nothing contained in reports to the Convention shall be construed 
as an action of the Convention except the recommendations which 
are definitely listed and adopted by the Convention. 

ARTICLE VI. Amendments to By-Laws 

The By-Laws may be altered by a majority vote of the messengers 
present on the first or second day of the Convention. 



PROCEEDINGS 



PROCEEDINGS 



WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 11, 1947 

1. One Thousand Three Hundred and Thirty-six Baptist mes- 
sengers and Three Hundred and Fifteen visitors were in attendance 
at the One Hundred Seventeenth Annual Session of the State Con- 
vention of North Carolina Baptist which met at the First Baptist 
Church of Winston-Salem beginning November 11, 1947. The gen- 
eral theme of the Convention "By My Spirit," Zech. 4:6, char- 
acterized the splendid spirit running throughout the entire Con- 
vention. 

2. Casper C. Warren, Charlotte, President of the Convention, 
called the Convention to the transaction of business at 10 o'clock 
a.m., and requested Rommie Pierce, Wingate Junior College, Win- 
gate, Director of Music for the Convention, to lead in the opening 
hymn, "Come Thou Almighty King," assisted at the piano by Miss 
Dina Dominguez, Wingate. 

3. The opening devotion was offered by Harry D. Wood, Jr., 
Angier. 

4. The enrollment of messengers was continued at this time by 
the Committee previously named by the President and composed 
of the following:* 

W. R. Grigg, Chairman, Winston-Salem; W. E. Pettit, Winston- 
Salem; Charles H. Stevens, Winston-Salem; Fletcher Lambert, 
Leaksville; Dewey Armstrong, Winston-Salem; R. Von King, Greens- 
boro; H. O. Miller, High Point; J. G. Allgood, Yadkinville; G. D. 
White, Statesville. 

W. R. Grigg, Chairman, Winston-Salem announced at this hour 
that 610 messengers had registered and his motion carried that 
the present enrolled messengers and all other messengers who may 
register during the remaining sessions constitute the Convention for 
the transaction of the Order of Business. 

5. Julian S. Hopkins, High Point, Chairman, Committee on Order 
of Business, presented on behalf of the Committee the following 
Order of Business, which upon his motion was adopted: 



26 Baptist State Convention 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, WINSTON-SALEM 

November 11-13, 1947 
General Themes "By My Spirit" Zech. 4:6 

TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 11 

10:00 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier 
10:10 Enrollment and Organization 

Report of Committee on Enrollment 

10:20 Report of Committees 
Order of Business 

Julian S. Hopkins, Chairman, High Point 
Committee on Committees 
10:25 Recognition of Winston-Salem Pastors, New Pastors, and 
Visitors 

10:35 Sunday School Board Zeno Wall, Shelby, Presiding 

Address by Jerome O. Williams, Nashville, Tenn. 
10:55 Presentation of Reports and Recommendations 
11:45 Miscellaneous and Music 

12:00 Convention Sermon J. W. Suttle, Shelby 

Alternate R. E. Brickhouse, Warrenton 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

2:30 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

Tom M. Freeman, Burlington 
2:40 Miscellaneous 

2:45 Orphanage Zeno Wall, Shelby, Presiding 

3:15 Report of Committee on Social Service and Civic 

Righteousness.— Phil L. Elliott, Chairman, Boiling Springs 

3:40 Special Music 

3:50 Woman's Missionary Union 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh, Presiding 

Address M. T. Rankin, Executive Secretary Foreign 

Mission Board, Richmond, Virginia 

TUESDAY EVENING 

7:30 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

R. Talmage Smith, Henderson 
7:40 Report of Committee on Committees and Miscellaneous 
7:45 Report of Special and Advisory Committee on Radio 
8:00 State Missions 



of North Carolina 27 

9:00 The Cooperative Program 

The What and How of It Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill 

The Support of It Through Tithes and Offerings 

Charles E. Parker, Franklin 

WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 12 

9:30 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

Woodrow W. Hill, Albemarle 
9:40 Report of Committees 
9:50 Miscellaneous 
10:00 Seminaries 

Address by Roland Q. Leavell, New Orleans 
10:30 Report of Biblical Recorder. ..Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro 
10:50 Music 

10:55 Baptist Foundation 
11:10 Election of Officers (General Secretary, Recording Secretary, 

Statistical Secretary, President and Vice Presidents) 
11:40 Special Music 
11:45 Address: "Triumphing by the Holy Spirit" 

R. G. Lee, Memphis, Tenn. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 

2:30 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

J. Clarence Jones, Newell 
2:40 Report of Committee on Convention's Plan for Wake Forest 
Address by Horace Easom, Director, Shelby 
Address by J. Melville Broughton, Raleigh 
3:20 Report of Committee on Disposition of Wake Forest Property 
3:30 Report of Council on Christian Education 

C. Sylvester Green, Durham 
4:00 Adjourn to Visit Sites of Wake Forest College and Medical 
Center 

WEDNESDAY EVENING 
7:30 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

John L. Coley, Raleigh 
7:40 Report of Trustees of the Convention 

Report of Historical Commission 
7:50 Report of Committees 

(a) Committee on Place and Preacher 

(b) Committee on Music 

(c) Committee on Publicity 
8:00 American Bible Society 

8:10 Foreign Missions 

Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, Presiding 
Address by Bela Udvarnoki, Budapest, Hungary 
8:45 Special Music 
8:50 Address: "Christ Above All" R. G. Lee, Memphis, Tenn. 



28 Baptist State Convention 

THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 13 
9:30 Praise, Scripture Reading and Prayer 

Raymond C. Lanier, Rocky Mount 
9:40 Hospital 
10:00 Report of Committees 

(1) Report of Committee to Report on General Board's 
Report 

(2) Resolutions 

(3) To Nominate Trustees of the Convention, Members 
of General Board, Trustees and Directors of Conven- 
tion's Institutions and Agencies 

10:30 Miscellaneous 

10:40 Relief and Annuity Board 

Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville, Presiding 

Address by Robert S. Jones, Dallas Texas 
11:10 Home Missions J. Roy Clifford, Lexington, Presiding 

Address by R. G. Van Royen, Secretary of Visual Education, 

Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga. 
11:40 Miscellaneous 
11:45 Reading of Journal 
11:50 Memorials 
11:55 Special Music 
12:00 Address: "Powerful Witnesses" 

W. Marshall Craig, Dallas, Texas 

COMMITTEE ON ORDER OF BUSINESS 
Julian S. Hopkins, Chairman J. Roy Clifford 
J. C. Cammack W. A. Poole 

J. D. McCready Ben C. Fisher 

C. N. Royal Ira D. S. Knight 

6. President Warren announced that the following would serve 
as Committee on Committees: 

H. G. Hammett, Chairman, Durham; Jarvis W. Teague, Seaboard; 
J. Boyce Brooks, Roxboro; J. M. Hayes, Winston-Salem; Stephen 
Morrisett, Boiling Springs; Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn; A. B. Wood, 
Charlotte; O. M. Seigler, Henderson ville; W. Perry Crouch, Ashe- 
ville; R. E. Hardaway, Greenville; J. N. Watson, Marshville; R. 
Homer Andrews, Burlington; J. L. Jones, Murfreesboro; E. F. Sul- 
livan, Hickory; G. Van Stephens, Warsaw. 

7. H. G. Hammett, Durham, Chairman of the Committee on 
Committees released at this time and at other periods during the 
sessions of the Convention the following Committees who were 
elected upon his motion: 



of North Carolina 29 

COMMITTEES TO REPORT DURING THE 1947 
CONVENTION 

Committee to Report on General Board's Report 

Zeno Wall, Chairman, Shelby Wyman E. Wood, Hickory 

Wra. Harrison Williams, Char- Julian S. Hopkins, High Point 

lotte C. N. Royal, Durham 

J. V. Case, Rose Hill Alton Morris, Murphy 

S. N. Lamb, Whiteville James Potter, Statesville 

O. D. Moore, Lincolnton Clyde Glosson, Kernersville 

Charles B. Trammel, Troy W. F. Woodall, Lenoir 

Nane Starnes, Asheville Oscar Creech, Ahoskie 

Douglas M. Branch, Kannapolis Grady Burgiss, Jacksonville 

Mrs. Egbert L. Davis, Sr., Wins- W. V. Tarlton, Concord 

ton-Salem Howard Ford, Elkin 

Edwin F. Perry, Rockingham E. R. Stewart, Hamilton 
Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, Roxboro 

Committee on Place and Preacher 

R. E. Hardaway, Chairman, N. B. Phillips, East Flat Rock 

Greenville M. L. Banister, Oxford 

O. A. Anderson, Rowland H. M. Hocutt, Asheville 

Raymond Long, Charlotte J. E. Lanier, Winton 

F. D. Hemphill, Hickory S. F. Hudson, Lillington 

Committee on Resolutions 

Yancey C. Elliott, Chairman, E. F. Hardin, Morganton 

Sanford C. D. Bessinger, Asheville 

Ray Roberts, Winston-Salem Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City 

Lowell Sodeman, Clinton B. E. Morris, Durham 

W. N. Long, Belmont J. B. Dailey, Jackson 

Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill Charles E. Parker, Franklin 

Archie Prevatte, Chadbourn J. E. Kirk, Reidsville 

COMMITTEES TO REPORT DURING THE 1948 
CONVENTION 

Committee on Order of Business 

F. O. Mixon, Chairman, Raleigh S. Lewis Morgan, Dunn 

W. Perry Crouch, Asheville Avery M. Church, Winston- 

J. Samuel Johnson, Durham Salem 

Earle J. Rogers, Seaboard J. C. Meigs, Polkton 

J. Marvin Crowe, Charlotte W. Walter Jones, Lenoir 

Committee on Publicity 

Fon H. Scofield, Jr., Chairman, R. E. Price, Rutherfordton 

Wake Forest Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City 

L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh J. A. McMillan, Thomasville 



30 



Baptist State Convention 



Committee on Social 

R. M. Lee, Chairman, Mars 
R. A. Ellis, Salisbury 
T. P. Pruitt, Hickory 
T. L. Sasser, Greensboro 
Earl C. James, Elkin 
M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion 
L. V. Coggins, Semora 
R. C. Foster, Leaks ville 



Service and Civic Righteousness 

Hill J. M. Hayes, Winston-Salem 
A. C. Reid, Wake Forest 
M. L. Davis, Beaufort 
Gaither Beam, Louisburg 
Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh 
J. M. Duncan, Murfreesboro 
Mrs. Hubert Boney, Teachey 



Committee to Nominate Members of the General Board, Trustees and 
Directors of Institutions and Agencies of the Convention 



Ralph A. Herring, Chairman, 

Winston-Salem 
Charles A. Maddry, Wilmington 
J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro 
C. C. Warren, Charlotte 
L. L. Hatfield, Hickory 
R. N. Simms, Raleigh 
O. M. Seigler, Hendersonville 



Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson 
H. G. Hammett, Durham 
E. N. Gardner, Henderson 
Carey P. Herring, Fairmont 
James B. Turner, Laurinburg 
A. B. Wood, Charlotte 
W. T. Baucom, Yanceyville 
J. W. Suttle, Shelby 



Radio Advisory Committee 

L. J. Morris, Chairman, Raleigh W. Wilbur Hutchins, High Point 
A. Hartwell Campbell, Dunn Thane McDonald, Wake Forest 

Gerald C. Primm, Sanford 

Committee on Memorials 

E. S. Summers, Chairman, Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh 

Concord W. H. Davis, Hendersonville 

J. W. Kincheloe, Rocky Mount C. C. Burris, Wingate 



Historical 

George W. Paschal, Chairman, 

Wake Forest 
J. W. Whitley, Albemarle 
Mrs. E. T. Crittendon, Wake 

Forest 
Thad F. Deitz, Sylva 
L. R. Pruitt, Charlotte 
J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs 



Commission 

S. L. Morgan, Wake Forest 
H. S. Averitt, Fayetteville 
L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh 
Miss Flossie Martin, Winston- 
Salem 
Willis G. Briggs, Raleigh 
. Mrs. J. A. Yarbrough, Charlotte 
R. L. Moore, Mars Hill 



Music Committee 



Stephen Morrisett, Chairman, 

Boiling Springs 
Rommie Pierce, Wingate 
Robert Guy, Ridgecrest 
W. Earl Robinson, Saint Pauls 



A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek 
J. L. Jones, Murfreesboro 
Mrs. Gladys Souther, Mars Hill 
John Holmes, Raleigh 
Grady Miller, Winston-Salem 



Charles P. Burchette, Bladenboro W. B. Lloyd, Thomasville 



of North Carolina 



31 



Committee to Secure Student Center Property at Chapel Hill 



Grover H. Jones, Chairman, 

High Point 
J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro 
Maurice Hill, Morganton 
Julian Allsbrook, Roanoke 

Rapids 



Winfield Blackwell, Winston- 
Salem 
I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill 
J. M. Phipps, Chapel Hill 



Nominations for Allied Church League 



R. E. Price, Rutherfordton 

T. P. Pruitt, Hickory 

E. B. Goodin, Lincolnton 

L. L. Hatfield, Hickory 

R. C. Foster, Leaksville 

Grover H. Jones, High Point 

L. E. Andrews, Lexington 

J. H. Early, Winston-Salem 

J. G. Pritchard, Windsor 

T. E. Story, North Wilkesboro 

Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro 

LeRoy Martin, Raleigh 

R. S. Averett, Winston-Salem 

Santford Martin, Winston-Salem 

W. L. Stewart, Clinton 

E. Yates Webb, Shelby 

E. C. Roach, Kannapolis 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield 

B. A. Bowers, Ridgecrest 
M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort 
Sankey L. Blanton, Wake Forest 
Harry B. Caldwell, Durham 

C. H. Durham, Lumberton 
Mrs. T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia 
W. B. Carr, Mooresville 

Wm. Harrison Williams, Char- 
lotte 
W. J. Berryman, Edenton 



S. N. Lamb, Whiteville 
John A. Oates, Fayetteville 
Clarence Poe, Raleigh 
I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill 
J. A. McMillan, Thomasville 
L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh 
M. A. Huggins, Raleigh 

B. M. Covington, Wadesboro 
A. Paul Bagby, Buie's Creek 
O. L. Moore, Laurinburg 

M. L. Banister, Oxford 

E. F. Sullivan, Hickory 

James M. Hayes, Winston-Salem 

J. Y. Joyner, LaGrange 

Don C. Young, Asheville 

W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh 

J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro 

M. M. Jernigan, Dunn 

H. B. Anderson, Durham 

Theo B. Davis, Zebulon 

L. R. Varser, Lumberton 

E. N. Gardner, Henderson 

Mrs. T. H. Plemmons, Charlotte 

Lee Weathers, Shelby 

H. L. Ferguson, Charlotte 

H. K. Masteller, Asheboro 

C. C. Wrenn, Siler City 
E. W. Pate, Wilmington 



Committee on Evangelism 

Alexander — E. V. Bumgarner, Taylorsville 
Alleghany — F. G. Walker, Sparta 
Anson — J. C. Meigs, Polkton 
Ashe — R. C. Ashley, Bina 
Atlantic — J. L. Hodges, New Bern 
Avery — J. W. Costner, Newland 
Beulah — J. F. Funderburk, Roxboro 
Bladen — A. D. Frazier, Elizabethtown 
Blue Ridge — M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion 



32 Baptist State Convention 

Brunswick — Herbert Baker, Southport 

Brier Creek — G. D. White, Statesville (Rt. 5) 

Brushy Mountain — A. W. Eller, Wilkesboro (Rt. 1) 

Buncombe — Nane Starnes, Asheville 

Cabarrus — E. B. Hicks, Concord (Rt. 1) 

Caldwell — W. F. Woodall, Lenoir 

Carolina — Fred Poplin, Flat Rock 

Catawba River — Fred Forester, Drexel 

Chowan — Lee A. Phillips, Fairfield 

Columbus — S. N. Lamb, Whiteville 

Dan Valley — R. C. Foster, Leaksville 

Dock — Gaston Hester, Bladenboro 

Eastern — J. B. Case, Rose Hill 

Elkin — Howard J. Ford, Elkin 

Flat River — L. R. Jordan, Creedmoor 

French Broad — A. K. Cheek, Marshall 

Gaston — T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia 

Green River — M. F. Hall, Rutherfordton 

Haywood — C. H. Green, Canton 

Johnston — J. C. Cammack, Smithfield 

Kings Mountain — Boyd Cannon, Shelby 

Liberty — Chas. F. Leek, Thomasville 

Little River — G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Macon — Charles E. Parker, Franklin 

Mecklenburg — J. Clyde Yates, Charlotte 

Mitchell — Roy Campbell, Bakersville 

Montgomery — Chas. B. Trammel, Troy 

Mount Zion — H. B. Anderson, Durham 

New Found — R. B. Vaughan, Marshall 

Neuse — Howard G. Dawkins, Kinston 

New South River — G. N. Ashley, Salemburg 

Pee Dee — J. D. Whisnant, Raeford 

Piedmont — J. S. Hopkins, High Point 

Pilot Mountain — R. E. Adams, Winston-Salem 

Raleigh — R. T. Stancil, Apex 

Randolph — R. E. Heath, Asheboro 

Roanoke — R. C. Lanier, Rocky Mount 

Robeson — J. L. Mauney, Red Springs 

Rowan — R. O. Brinkley, China Grove 

Sandy Creek — Roy A. Morris, Sanford 

Sandy Run — Tom S. Lawrence, Cliffside 

South Fork — J. Louis Price, Hickory 

South Mountain — O. S. Long, Lawndale 

South Yadkin — C. C. Holland, Statesville 

Stanly — L. D. Munn, Badin 

Stone Mountain — S. L. Blevins, Hays 

Stony Fork — W. J. Cook, Boone 

Surry — Lonnie Fleming, Mount Airy 

Tar River — Aubrey S. Tomlinson, Louisburg 



of North Carolina 33 

Three Forks — H. K. Middleton, Sherwood 
Tennessee River — S. L. Lamm, Bryson City 
Transylvania — Ralph Banning, Horse Shoe 
Tuckaseigee — B. S. Hensley, Sylva 
Union — J. N. Watson, Marshville 
West Chowan — Jarvis Teague, Seaboard 
West Liberty — W. T. Truett, Culberson 
Western North Carolina — T. Earl Ogg, Andrews 
Wilmington — Ben B. Ussery, Carolina Beach 
Yadkin — John I. Kizer, Booneville 
Yancey — A. Z. Jamerson, Burnsville 
Burnt Swamp — L. W. Jacobs, Pembroke 
Cherokee — William Welch, Cherokee 

8. President Warren requested Walter L. Warfford, Associational 
Missionary, Winston-Salem, to present the pastors serving the Bap- 
tist churches in the Winston-Salem area. These ministers were 
L. V. Connell, L. J. Matthews, W. E. Pettit, E. G. Jordan, J. G. 
Brendle, Ralph A. Herring, B. S. Turner, Clyde E. Luther, R. E. 
Adams, J. M. Hayes, Charles H. Stevens, W. R. Grigg, T. C. Keaton, 
G. Elmo Renegar, Avery M. Church, and R. S. Phillips. 

9. Twenty-four new pastors were present at this session of the 
Convention and at this time came forward and were introduced 
and extended cordial greetings by General Secretary M. A. Huggins. 
The new pastors introduced were: 

NEW PASTORS RECOGNIZED 

Robert W. Abrams, West Asheville; W. Brady Archer, Asheville; 
Jack R. Bagwell, Asheville; R. O. Bennett, Jr., Mayodan; Thomas 
A. Bland, Carrboro; Norman L. Blythe, Rocky Mount; W. G. Bond, 
Boone; W. E. Coates, Reidsville; W. E. Entrekin, Kannapolis; J. R. 
Featherston, Forest City; Arthur Francis, Nashville; Harold L. 
Hawkins, Spring Hope; H. B. Huggins, Windsor; L. A. Huneycutt, 
Salisbury; Wilbur A. Huneycutt, Black Mountain; Kenneth M. 
Lindner, Fayetteville; Carlton T. Mitchell, Zebulon; C. E. Scar- 
borough, Tryon; H. R. Starling, Roxboro; H. Hansel Stembridge, 
Jr., Forest City; Mack M. Summey, Valdese; A. E. Teague, Spring 
Lake; Geo. E. Williamson, Greensboro; Edgar U. Wilmer, Spencer; 
Joseph F. Woodson, Aberdeen. 

10. President Warren requested the many visitors present to 
stand and be recognized, several of whom came from outside North 
Carolina. The names of these visitors appear on page 87. 

11. Zeno Wall, Shelby, North Carolina Member of the Sunday 
School Board presided during the consideration of the work of 
the Sunday School Board. Jerome O. Williams, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, representing the Sunday School Board, addressed the Con- 
vention. 

3 



34 Baptist State Convention 

12. Highlighting the next hour was the presenting of the General 
Board's Report. Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson, President of the Board, 
presided and presented M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, General Secretary, 
who emphasized a great many items of significant interest covering 
the work of the Convention during the past year. The report which 
begins on Page 93 represents in the opinion of the General Secre- 
tary the most significant report since 1932. He pointed out that the 
outstanding accomplishments came about because of the splendid 
team work manifested by the administrative workers and the great 
host of Baptist pastors and other leaders scattered throughout North 
Carolina. 

In addition to the recommendations which begin on Page 163, 
General Secretary Huggins introduced Grover H. Jones, High Point, 
who offered the following resolution which had received the ap- 
proval of the General Board and which was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions: 

LEASE AND OPTION TO PURCHASE CHAPEL HILL PROPERTY 

Whereas the General Board has authorized a lease on what is 
known as the Roberson property located on Columbia Street in 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, for one year, ending September 30, 
1948, with an option to buy such property at $35,000 at any time 
within that period, and 

Whereas it appears wise to many individual Baptists, who are 
interested in extending the work among the Baptist students at 
Chapel Hill, to purchase such property, if the money can be secured 
largely from alumni of the University of North Carolina and other 
interested friends, 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Convention ap- 
point a committee of seven, and that this committee undertake to 
raise the needed amount as soon as possible; certainly before the 
date that the present lease expires. 

Recommendation No. 8 received special notice which would by 
proper resolution give the General Board and the Trustees of the 
Convention authorization to purchase certain real estate located 
at 304 North Tryon Street, Charlotte, for the use of the Convention. 
R. Archie Ellis, Salisbury, responded to the request of the General 
Secretary, who as Chairman of the Committee of the General Board 
to acquire a suitable site in Charlotte, reported that in the opinion 
of the Committee, which was shared by the General Board, that 
the location being recommended for the Convention to purchase 
was excellently located and that he was authorized by the Com- 
mittee and the General Board to present the following resolution 
involving the lease and option to purchase the above mentioned 
site. 

Since the Resolution involves the borrowing of money, it was 



of North Carolina 35 

pointed out that the procedure as outlined in Article X of the Con- 
stitution was being strictly followed. The Resolution follows: 

LEASE AND OPTION TO PURCHASE REAL ESTATE 

304 North Tryon Street, Charlotte 

Whereas the General Board has leased the building in Charlotte, 
located at 304 North Tryon Street, with an option to buy, and 

Whereas it appears to be wise to purchase the property, inasmuch 
as it has high rental value, and at the same time money can be 
secured at a low rate of interest, 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED 

1. That the General Board, or its Executive Committee, be 
authorized to purchase said property at a cost of about $95,000.00, 
including repairs and alterations made on the building. 

2. That the Trustees of the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina, a corporation, be authorized and instructed to take title 
to said property when purchased. 

3. That the General Board, or its Executive Committee, be 
authorized and instructed to negotiate a loan in an amount not 
to exceed $95,000.00; that an amount not to exceed $60,000.00 of 
the total amount borrowed be secured by a first mortgage on the 
property, and that the remainder of the full amount, $35,000.00, be 
borrowed on an open note; that the said trustees be authorized and 
instructed to execute and secure the loan. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the terms and payments on 
said loan, including the mortgage loan and the open note, shall 
be substantially as follows: 

The loan shall extend for a period of about eight years, with an 
interest rate of 3 per cent, and payments on the principal shall be 
substantially as follows: 

1948 j $ 6,000.00 

1949 6,000.00 

1950 10,000.00 

1951 13,000.00 

1952 15,000.00 

1953 15,000.00 

1954 15,000.00 

1955 15,000.00 



$95,000.00 



36 Baptist State Convention 

13. Greetings were received and messages sent to the following 
Baptist State Conventions holding Annual Conventions on this 
same date. 

North Carolina Group, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 

Louisville, Kentucky 
Alabama Baptist State Convention meeting in Montgomery 
Georgia Baptist State Convention meeting in Atlanta 
South Carolina Baptist State Convention meeting in Greenville 
Tennessee Baptist State Convention meeting in Kingsport 
Texas Baptist General Convention meeting at Amarillo 

The Recording Secretary in behalf of the Convention sent per- 
sonal messages to the following who were prevented from attending 
the sessions of the Convention. 

C. C. Burris, Wingate 

Theo B. Davis, Wenatchee, Washington 

Charles E. Maddry, Chapel Hill 

O. R. Mangum, Lenoir 

Hight C. Moore, Ridgecrest 

R. L. Moore, Mars Hill . 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh 

L. R. Pruett, Charlotte 

B. W. Spilman, Kinston 

A response was received from C. C. Burris, Hight C. Moore, R. L. 
Moore, L. L. Morgan, and B. W. Spilman. 

Song: "He Leadeth Me" 

14. This Tuesday morning session closed with the Convention 
sermon. R. E. Brickhouse, Warrenton, read the scripture using the 
following passages: John 12:38; Isaiah 6:1;45;32; Numbers 21:6; 
Song of Solomon 4;6. 

Sankey L. Blanton, Wake Forest, prayed and he was followed 
by J. W. Suttle, Shelby, who preached the sermon using as the 
subject, "The Lifted Vision Brings a Lifting Hand," from the text, 
Psalms 121:1. 

15. After the singing of "I Am Bound for the Promised Land" 
and "Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow," Zeno Wall, 
Shelby, offered the closing prayer and the session adjourned. 

TUESDAY— Afternoon Session 

16. Vice President F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh, presided in the 
opening of this session and Tom M. Freeman, Burlington, brought 
the devotion. 

17. Under miscellaneous business Richard K. Redwine, Hickory, 
gave notice that on tomorrow he would move to amend the Consti- 
tution by adding the following sentence to appear as the last sentence 



or North Carolina 37 

to Sub-Section 1 under Section A, Article VIII of the Constitution: 
'Any person who has served not longer than one year of any un- 
expired term is eligible to suceed himself." 

18. Vice President Mixon called for the report on the Baptist 
Orphanage of North Carolina and Superintendent I. G. Greer, 
Thomasville, responded and requested Zeno Wall, Shelby, Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees to preside during the consideration 
of the report. Superintendent Greer presented first J. D. Fraley, 
the new Treasurer of the Orphanage; Paul Keys, the new Farm 
Manager succeeding the late C. O. McCoin who likewise had served 
the Orphanage in that capacity for many years; and another new 
Member of the Orphanage group presented was J. O. Walton, the 
new minister at the Mills Home. 

Associated with the Superintendent in presenting the Orphanage 
report were Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Lord, Musical Directors at the Mills 
Home. Former and present students at the Mills Home contributed 
the following to the report: 

John Brenniger, student at the University of North Carolina, 
sang "I Would Rather Have Jesus." 

Miss Hilda Smith and Miss Ethel Ball of the Mills Home brought 
inspiring messages in support of the Orphanage report. 

Paul Smith of the Mills Home. brought the consideration of the 
Orphanage report to conclusion in the singing of two numbers, 
"The Holy City" and "The Ninety and Nine." 

Song: "My Faith Looks Up To Thee" 

19. Prior to the presentation of the report of the Committee on 
Social Service and Civic Righteousness, Phil L. Elliott, Boiling 
Springs, Chairman, pointed out that various members of the Com- 
mittee had prepared different divisions of the report and that the 
following report, which he read, carried the unanimous recom- 
mendation of the entire Committee, and upon his motion the report 
was adopted. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SOCIAL SERVICE AND 
CIVIC RIGHTEOUSNESS 

INTRODUCTION 

We do not conceive it as our duty to work out in this report meth- 
ods and details of procedure in handling social evils. As we conceive 
it, it is not ours as a denomination to enter scientific, economic, racial, 
and political debate. More is it ours to point direction. It is ours to 
proclaim and propagate the Gospel in all its implications, including 
its effect upon politics, economics, education, science, and social serv- 
ice. It is in this spirit that we bring you the report of the Committee 
on Social Service and Civic Righteousness. In so far as we can, we 
make a positive approach. Neither do we attempt to cover all the 
items with which this subject is concerned, but we have selected a 
few significant topics sufficient to point the direction of our thinking. 



38 Baptist State Convention 

OUR TEACHER PROBLEM 

While disavowing any purpose to engage ourselves in partisan 
issues of political and economic nature, we deplore the discrimina- 
tion in salary scales generally current against those engaged in 
character-building professions. The finest, best-trained personnel 
must be attracted by state-supported and denominational school for 
the all-important task of teaching and training today's youth for 
citizenship in God's one world. Our society must re-evaluate more 
nearly in terms of his worth the services of its teacher. 

As citizens of a spiritual kingdom, Baptists recognize that the 
work of the preacher and that of the teacher must go hand in hand. 
Constant reinterpretation and reiteration of our Christian principles 
in the light of changing world conditions must accompany evangel- 
ism in the transformation of this materialistic society into Christ's 
spiritual kingdom. It is imperative, therefore, that salary schedules 
for teachers in our Christian schools approach more nearly those 
found in the best regional institutions of similar grade, in order that 
quantitatively and qualitatively our youth may receive the best 
training of hand, head, and heart. However, we do not believe that 
Federal aid in education will help to achieve that if in any way 
such aid regiments or influences the operation of our schools. Nor 
do we believe that the program of universal military training will 
help us. 

LIQUOR TRAFFIC 

The Record clearly indicates that intemperance is making tre- 
mendous progress in our country. 

a. Per capita consumption of beverage liquors increased from 
10.25 in 1934 to 20.53 gallons in 1945. 

b. Drunkenness increased from 1,019 per 100,000 in 1932 (the last 
prohibition year) to 2,000 per 100,000 in 1945. 

c. Convictions within the courts increased from 55,000 annually 
during dry years to 81,000 for the last pre-war year. 

d. Saloons have increased until there are 407,000 in the United 
States, with package stores outnumbering churches and schools. 

e. Liquor monopolies and consolidations have been allowed to 
gain such strength as to dictate government policies, and liquor 
advertising has become a major industry, subsidizing much of the 
public press, the radio, and the screen. 

f. There are today more barmaids than college girls, and traceable 
directly to intoxicants are 60 suicides every twenty-four hours, a 
murder every forty minutes, and a major crime every forty-two 
seconds. 

The Anti-Saloon League reveals a brighter side of the picture. 
(Within the borders of our Southern Convention are 1,339 coun- 
ties. Almost one-half, or 630, have gained a dry status on either wine, 
beer, or whiskey, or all three. Oklahoma, alone, is wholly dry, while 
Missouri, South Carolina, Arizona, and California are wholly wet. 
All other states have some form of local option. Still greater success 



of North Carolina 39 

seems presently possible if Southern Baptists will get down to a 
program of implementation. 

In the light of the above facts, your committee makes the follow- 
ing recommendations: 

1. That Christian people of the State vote for candidates in the 
elections to be held next year who pledge their vote and influence 
to the cause of prohibition. 

2. That our Baptist associations throughout the State organize, 
work, and pray for the abolition of alcoholic beverages. 

3. That all Christian churches and ministers repeatedly inform 
our people concerning the evils of the liquor traffic. 

4. That the Convention condemn the undemocratic action of the 
Legislature in permitting a referendum on the liquor issue on a 
municipal basis instead of on the county-unit basis. 

5. That the Convention endorse the democratic method of decid- 
ing this issue in a state-wide referendum. 

6. That this Convention call upon all of its members to strictly 
observe the principle of total abstinence and to publicly reaffirm 
their Baptist position as set forth in many church covenants, that 
the sale and use of beverage liquors are against the welfare of the 
nation and Christian progress. 

7. That the Convention commend the Allied Church League for its 
relentless opposition to the liquor traffic and Alcoholics Anony- 
mous for the splendid service it is rendering to alcoholics in our 
State. 

8. That the Convention urge upon our Senators and Congressmen 
the passage of the bill now pending in the United States Senate 
to prohibit the advertising of alcoholic beverages. This bill is known 
as the Capper Bill or Senate Bill number 265. 

ECONOMIC AND RACE PROBLEMS 

The Social Service Commission of the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion presented statements which were unanimously adopted by the 
Convention, and the Committee on Race Relations presented a report 
which was adopted by the Convention, and your committee feels that 
the position of North Carolina Baptists could not be stated in a 
better way than it is stated in the words of these two reports: 

"These doctrines which must commend themselves to every con- 
science impel us to the observance of the following principles of 
conduct : 

"1. We shall think of the Negro as a person and treat him ac- 
cordingly. 

"2. We shall continually strive as individuals to conquer all preju- 
dice and eliminate from our speech terms of contempt and from our 
conduct actions of ill will. 

"3. We shall teach our children that prejudice is unchristian and 
that good will and helpful deeds are the duty of every Christian 
toward all men of all races. 



40 Baptist State Convention 

"4. We shall protest against injustice and indignities against Ne- 
groes, as we do in the case of people of our own race, whenever and 
wherever we meet them. 

"5. We want the Negro to enjoy the rights granted to him under 
the Constitution of the United States, including the right to vote, 
to serve on juries, to receive justice in the courts, to be free from 
mob violence, to secure a just share of the benefits of educational 
and other funds, and to receive equal service for equal payment on 
public carriers and conveniences. 

"6. We shall be just in our dealing with the Negro as an indi- 
vidual. Whenever he is in our employ we shall pay him an adequate 
wage and provide for him healthful working conditions. 

"7. We shall strive to promote community good will between the 
races in every way possible. 

"8. We shall actively cooperate with Negro Baptists in the build- 
ing up of their churches, the education of their ministers, and the 
promotion of their missions and evangelistic programs." 

No doubt some will be conscious of limitations in these proposals, 
but they are realistic, practical, and constitute a definite basis of 
conduct that must appeal to all as being an advance in the direction 
of basic human justice. As they are achieved, they will bear fruit in 
a general improvement of racial attitudes and therefore of racial 
adjustments at all points of racial contact. 

UNCHRISTIAN ATTITUDES IN INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 

At this moment of history the economic sphere of life confronts the 
Christian conscience with special insistency. This is particularly true 
here in the South where it is yet possible for us to avoid the situa- 
tions which have developed elsewhere. Organized labor is in the 
midst of a campaign to organize the workers of the South, and man- 
agement has in general opposed the movement. A divided public 
opinion has taken sides, here with one, and there with the other. 
The situation is one of conflict which easily engenders unreasonable 
and unchristian prejudices that set men off in classes with confirmed 
hostilities. Our churches must accept responsibility because of the 
basic affirmations of our faith. We are responsible for the spiritual 
well-being of our members, and society, and all persons are greatly 
affected by the economic environment in which they mature. If we 
have any message for the South, this is the time to proclaim it. 

As we face the imminent possibility of industrial conflict in our 
area, your Commission believes that the role of the church should 
be clearly defined. We do not believe that the church can take sides 
in the struggle. We cannot give aid to the organizing of labor unions; 
we cannot give aid to management in any struggle against unions; 
nor can we be identified with the cooperative movements. To do so 
would be to negate the greater mission of the church. The kingdom 
of God cannot be coerced into the narrow confines of labor unions, 
industrial management or cooperatives. Rather must all these pat- 
terns be brought under the judgment of the kingdom of God. 



of North Carolina 41 

We ask, furthermore, that our people examine carefully the 
frightening manner in which we are losing our individual freedom 
under group pressure. The industialist faces it in his association of 
manufacturers; the laborer faces it in his union; and the farmer in 
his cooperative. Such organized groups are a part of our mechanized 
society, but their dominance over the individual conscience must be 
resisted. We are primarily citizens of the kingdom of God, and no 
lesser loyalty should command our allegiance. 

The churches must so proclaim the Gospel of Christ that a realiza- 
tion of our common bond in Him shall be attained. We must, by 
teaching and preaching, defeat any influence that would divide us 
into groups belligerently opposing each other. We are challenged to 
promote unity and understanding in the face of a threat to divide us 
into warring factions, and to make the good office of the church 
through its Christian leaders always available for mediation. 

Our devotion to justice and love must inspire confidence from all. 
A great challenge faces us, and we can only meet it by providing a 
labor and management leadership which have been nurtured in the 
ethical attitudes which are motivated only when life is in full sur- 
render to Jesus Christ. 

HOME RELATIONSHIPS 

Recognizing the Facts 

We recognize that the home is the seat of values which cannot be 
duplicated in any other setting. The truth and security of belonging 
to it and of sharing its experience is basic. In the home the individual 
may get a good working knowledge of self, as other family mem- 
bers show respect for him as a person, help him understand life's 
situations as he meets them, encourage him to take increasing re- 
sponsibility for solving his own problems, and aid him in finding 
the help he needs, rejoice with him in his successes, and help him 
understand his failures so that he thinks of these as steps in learn- 
ing without feeling of guilt or fear. In the home the individual may 
learn cooperative living, in which adults and children alike learn to 
understand other people's problems, to work toward common pur- 
poses, needs, and goals, to express friendliness toward others, and to 
deal with controversial matters without letting emotion obscure 
reason. In the home the individual may develop a proper under- 
standing of what sex means — of the differences between men and 
women, the proper behavior of each sex, of what marriage involves 
in the way of responsibilities, and of proper evaluation of what he or 
she learns about these things from parents and others. In the home 
the individual may develop a proper sense of values about God, re- 
ligion, and the church, as they relate to the home, recognizing that 
Christian education inheres in the home and its activities, as well as 
in the church and its activities, for if the home is Christ-centered it 
will be church centered. 

We recognize that the mother in the home is the "maker of the 
home," indispensable in the roles of physical nurture for the infant 



42 Baptist State Convention 

from conception, physical attraction to the father of the child that 
mankind may live, watch-care of the infant in its helplessness, ful- 
filling certain psychological drives of the father and the child in 
their need for affection, and meeting the intellectual, health, and 
spiritual needs of the children in the development of their per- 
sonalities. 

We recognize that youth is the focal point of the home, in that the 
coming of children into the home is written in the very nature of 
humanity, and in that the training of the children is the proverbial 
foundation of life. 

We recognize that the dissolution of the home, like a "dread dis- 
ease," has gripped our land today, ending in divorce in one out of 
three marriages, and will perhaps end in dissolution of one out of 
every two marriages in a decade. This dissolution is self-evident in 
the miseducation of our day, some sources of which we mention 
here. 

Misguided views of marriage, coming from many sources, play a 
part. The "Movies" often represent marriage from an unreal point 
of view, making "romantic love" the ultimate in marriage, absolv- 
ing the bride and groom of responsibility of each to the other, or to 
children that might come into the home, seldom showing the rupture 
of the personalities involved, emphasizing the intimacies of mar- 
riage and minimizing the results and responsibilities. Radio stories 
often play around disharmony, family trouble, divorce, etc., yet, in 
the end, "all is well," not telling the whole story of heartache, tears, 
agony of soul, and sometimes the utter disrupture of personality. 
Books of indecent living make it appear to the weak minds of our 
day that freedom of license is a part of the "real life" of our 
generation, seldom portraying the filth of disease, the frequent 
resultant suicide, the self-inflicted isolation from society, and some- 
times forced isolation. Current thought, labeled "the one-and-only 
theory," leads many to think that, when they have tried one person 
and have not been happy, that they must try again and again, if 
necessary, until they find their "one-and-only." 

Misconceived attitudes of economic responsibilities add their part. 
The idea, "pay for the job," rather than meet the needs of the 
family, creates a restlessness on the part of those who would wish to 
secure their families properly and ends many times in financial 
misunderstanding in the home, and often in disrupture of harmony, 
love, and affection, and many times in divorce. The "keeping up 
with the Jones" doctrine has also brought hardship and strain upon 
marital relations 

We recognize that "divorce" is the final symptom of a "dread 
disease," and is only a symptom, and that symptoms do not just 
happen, but have a fundamental cause, and that the cause must be 
treated rather than the symptom. 

We recognize that as long as marriages are carelessly, ignorantly, 
and lustfully entered into, attack upon "divorce" is symptomatic 
treatment. 



of North Carolina 43 



SUGGESTED PLANS OF ATTACK 



In the light of these things we suggest the following plans of attack. 
A constructive treatment of the pre-marriage period is imperative. 
All young people should have general preparation in their ideas 
and attitudes toward practices in marriage. This preparation should 
come under the auspices of the church, which should prepare the 
young people for a Christian attitude toward marriage and its re- 
sponsibilities. The school, in this cooperative group, should prepare 
the young people for a wholesome attitude toward the physical as- 
pects of marriage, as well as lend support to the moral aspects. The 
character-building organizations should undergird the church and 
the school in their efforts and should coordinate the teaching of these 
agencies and lend assistance to the young people in developing right 
practices. 

In the special preparation for each couple contemplating mar- 
riage, the responsibility rests primarily upon the home, or the fam- 
ily, which must have had a sound training itself if it is to be able 
to create proper attitudes; but the church also will fulfill its minis- 
try, primarily, in special counseling as the need arises, both from the 
point of view of the trained pastor, and from the point of view of 
the Christian people who have had sound, first-hand experience in 
this field. 

This pre-marital education is not merely to be a course or curricu- 
lum worked out and superimposed by adults (this is better than we 
are doing); rather it is to be the process of guiding and fulfilling 
the natural interests of the young people whose readiness for such 
education is shown by their questions and social activities. This 
education should involve re-education concerning the responsibilities 
in marriage, present and future, a look at reality within the broken 
homes, renewed appreciation of the merits of chastity over against 
unchastity, and a fuller understanding of the economic pressure 
upon youthful marriage and guidance in meeting it. 

In the second place, we suggest guidance of the growing relation- 
ship after marriage. This guidance should be given in a program 
of Adult Education through the public schools, Baptist colleges, and 
the local church, It should be given through the Sunday School 
Board of the Southern Baptist Convention, which should enlarge its 
department of "Home Life" to be able to direct in the respective 
State Convention a program of "Guidance for the Christian Home." 
Home Life, now published by this board, should be placed in every 
home of our Baptist people. The North Carolina Baptist Convention 
should set up a department of "Home Guidance," to be given the 
same importance as the Sunday School, Training Union, Student 
Department, Evangelism, or Woman's Missionary Union. This guid- 
ance program should include, among other approaches that might 
be mentioned, guidance in giving the things of deeper significance 
a fair place, such as service in the church, cherishing of symbols of 
rich experience, sharing with others, and the like. It should make 
available sources of information and counsel in those areas in which 



44 Baptist State Convention 

they are most likely to be needed. It should give guidance in special 
preparation for the unusual events and experiences, such as the 
coming of children, temporary separation, and the like; guidance in 
dealing with intimate and family problems to avoid unnecessary 
strains in relationships; guidance in distinguishing the values that are 
developing and emerging in their relationship, however these may 
differ from those anticipated, teaching them to watch for progress, 
not products; guidance in keeping them from getting lost in outside 
activities, including the church, which will bring individual recog- 
nition and success much more easily and flatteringly than does loyal 
devotion to marriage; guidance in keeping the married relationship 
interesting, sound, and deep, when there is danger that concern or 
love for the children may distract interest from the marital relation 
itself. Both husband and wife should be encouraged to keep growing, 
developing widening interests, and to regard growth with its changes, 
its possibilities, and its problems as the normal expectation. The 
newly married should be prepared for the latter period when neces- 
sary business and other serious matters begin to encroach upon their 
intimacy, when they begin to feel the limts of the actualities of life, 
when they begin to see each other with less romance, and other such 
searching experiences. ■ / '„ 

Finally, we suggest active participation on the part of the local 
church .to strengthen the new marital relationships. This active par- 
ticipation is to be over and above the guidance program suggested 
above, and its basic purpose should be to keep the new, tiny circle 
from closing in on the two within it by drawing them into a larger 
circle of group participation, and into some service to the church and 
the community. The church should plan some sort of follow-up 
which expresses the fellowship interest on the part of the church in 
their newly developing community, this follow-up to be rather close 
during the first year or two. This follow-up could include a modified 
form of the "Buddy" system used by some civic clubs and "Alco- 
olics Anonymous." In us all there should come a will to save the 
home. 

RECREATION AND LEISURE TIME 

Never before in the history of our country, has America been as 
recreation conscious as now. There are several factors contributing 
to this enthusiasm, four of which are mentioned: (1) The natural 
aftermath of the war-time emphasis upon recreation and industry, 
the armed forces, and communities as an essential aid to a men- 
tally and physically healthy people. (2) The growing trend in many 
communities towards youth responsibility in developing leisure time 
creatively and effectively. This trend is reflected in the growth of 
youth centers, clubs, and committees. (3) The reduction in working 
hours which gives more time for recreational activities; and (4) 
increased facilities and programs made possible by larger funds from 
national, state, and local governments. 

The emphasis of these agencies revolves around programs de- 
signed to: (1) check undesirable trends in community life (juvenile 



of North Carolina 45 

delinquency is an undesirable trend most frequently mentioned in 
this connection); (2) assist in the development of character and 
good citizenship; (3) provide creative means of expression; and 
(4) build a happy healthy community. 

We must remember, too, the ever-present commercial enterprises, 
however worthy and wholesome, whose motive is still primarily 
that of profit. 

The Christian church today must face squarely the problems and 
privileges presented by increased leisure time and current enthusi- 
asm in recreational activities. The Christian church must assume 
a position of leadership in this area or else follow the lead of com- 
mercial and civic interests. We are aware, however, that the church 
cannot hope to compete with these agencies in the fields of enter- 
tainment or recreation, nor should we expect it to do so, but the 
church can and must assume certain responsibilities in this area. 

First, there must be an awareness on the part of our churches 
and their leadership of the problems peculiar to the local com- 
munity. In this connection, we mention not only the delinquents 
themselves — both actual and potential^but also the influences with- 
in the community which contribute to delinquency. - ,v r ■-, ••-.• 

Second, there must be an awareness, and appreciation, on the 
part: of our churches and their leadeship of the facilities, • policies, 
and programs in the community which are designed to- combat 

unwholesome influences. •■■ ■■. ;. •=,«■■ ."- 

• Third, there must be developed within our ehurches' rand their 
leadership a sense of definite responsibility to assist every worthy 
effort whose purpose is to provide assistance in the development of 
character and good citizenship and the proper use of leisure time 
by providing activities which are wholesome and worth while. 

Fourth, our churches are urged to include in their established 
programs of work such activities as will promote Christian fellow- 
ship and wholesome recreation. The main purpose of such activi- 
ties must be the development of the individual rather than a pro- 
gram. Such activities would not compete with civic or commercial 
enterprises but would, rather, supplement them. Such a program 
must be distinctive in purpose, emphasis, and leadership. It cannot 
be attached, as secondary in importance, to organizational work 
and utilized altogether as a method of enlisting individuals and 
their interest. It must have a purpose of its own — and that purpose 
should be the development of the play-life of the individual as a 
contributing factor in more abundant living. Furthermore, such a 
program should be church-centered and church-financed. 

Many of our churches are already in such programs of Fellowship 
Groups, recreational rooms, church-wide (as against organizational) 
activities, summer camps, weekly age-group recreational programs, 
and many others. Such programs are organized and supported by 
many local churches themselves and some of the activities are sup- 
ported in cooperation with other churches or on an association- 
wide basis. 



46 Baptist State Convention 

Many of our churches today are losing the interest and support of 
many members because their social life is centered in non-church 
activities. We believe this problem can be materially lessened, if not 
eliminated almost entirely, when their hunger for play is satisfied 
on a plane of Christian fellowship. When this happens to an indi- 
vidual, it tends to give religion a more dominant place in his life. 
Then will we see greater spiritual power in both the life of the 
individual and the life of the church. 

We suggest that our State and Southwide headquarters give some 
consideration to a definite place in the set-up and promotion of 
recreation in the program of work for the churches. 

WAGING PEACE 

Peace is an attitude. It is an interest in the welfare of others 
accompanied with the desire to share the blessings of life with them. 
War on the other hand is also an attitude, but one which cherishes a 
conflict of selfish interests. We cannot hope to achieve a relationship 
which will be totally devoid of selfish or conflicting interests. Per- 
haps that would not be wholesome if we could. The last phase of the 
war, however, the killing of each other with a view of enforce- 
ing our demands, can be eliminated. 

We have learned many valuable lessons of late. We have learned, 
for example, that peace is harder to win than war. We have learned 
too that although peace is basically a spiritual attitude, it must have 
expression through some form of organization. In such an organiza- 
tion there must be a leadership that sees the truth. No organization 
made up of soverign powers can be effective in settling disputes 
unless there is a sacrifice of sovereignty on the part of each. Sover- 
eign powers do not exist side by side without conflicts unless there is 
the surrender of authority. The composite sovereignty made by the 
surrender or sacrifice of each must have the moral and material back- 
ing of all sufficient to make its decisions stand. General Isenhower 
recently said, "You cannot produce peace by hate and a club." 
Although stated negatively, this assertion has in it the basic directions 
for those who seek a positive program for peace : First, we must stop 
the "club" methods of settling difficulties and disputes. Second, we 
must change the attitude toward war and thus create a will for peace. 

We have tried many methods in the past, all of which have failed. 
Federations and leagues have developed most frequently into con- 
flicting power groups which have made war more certain as well as 
more terrible. Treaties between sovereign powers have proved little 
more effective. We had approximately 5,000 treaties in force at the 
outbreak of World War II. All together could not prevent the war. 
Treaties can be broken at will. 

These attempts at peaceful settlement of differences have failed 
because sovereign powers have refused to surrender sufficient author- 
ity. Even in our relationship with Canada we have had a Border 
Commission for some thirty years with power to settle all border 
disputes. To watch a boys' ball game in the back lot where everyone 



of North Carolina 47 

is his own umpire would convince anyone of the fallacy of trying to 
settle difficulties when there is no unbiased force with the authority 
to settle them. The League of Nations would have failed even if the 
United States had been in it without the surrender of authority on the 
part of each sufficient to make a power capable of settling disputes. 
A federation of American colonies instead of a federal union would 
have likewise failed. There must be an umpire with the power of 
decision and the power to enforce that decision. 

The American experiment affords an example of the successful 
operation of such a plan. We have in America all the causes of war 
anywhere. We have border disputes, economic unrest and injustice, 
legal trickery, totalitarian practices in labor and management, re- 
ligious prejudice, race hatred and discrimination — all the elements 
that produce war; but we have succeeded in outlawing war between 
the states because the states have delegated sufficient sovereignty to 
the union of the American people to settle all disputes. So far as 
we know this is the only plan that has succeeded in human history. 

We must change the attitude toward war. Many of our people are 
committed to a philosophy of the inevitability of war. Some dis- 
tinguished writers believe war is a biological necessity. Others hold 
that it is God's plan that wars must exist until the end. Any effort 
at peace is a failure to begin with if that effort is built upon a 
philosophy of the inevitability of war. Any effective desire for peace 
must be prefaced with the hope that peace may be obtained. If 
we wage peace, therefore, we must dethrone the idea that war 
must be. 

This in itself is not sufficient. We must supplant the idea of war 
with the will for peace. Here emerge all the creative enterprises of 
a great people; all the institutions — home, church, school, and gov- 
ernment — combine in creative endeavor sharing obligations and 
responsibilities toward the making of a great world citizenship, 
toward the great ideal of human brotherhood when we shall be 
mature enough to refuse to accept anything for ourselves that we 
would deny to any other on the same terms; and not only so, but go 
out to crusade that all may have what we wish for ourselves and 
ours. 

"When all men's good shall 
Be each man's rule and universal peace 
Lie like a shaft of light across the land 
And like a lane of beams athwart the sea 
Through all the circle of the Golden Year." 

CONCLUSION 

We realize that none of the above things can be accomplished in 
our own strength. We hold that the New Birth as taught in the New 
Testament can be the only solution to the social and civic problems 
of our world. We further assert that one cannot enjoy the blessings 
of New Birth without assuming the moral benefits afforded. There- 



48 Baptist State Convention 

fore we call upon the constituency of our great Convention to 
"preach without ceasing" the absolute necessity of the New Birth 
and the full implication of it as taught in the New Testament. 

Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness: 

P. L. Elliott, Boiling Springs, Chairman; 

George D. Heaton, Charlotte; 

W. E. Pettit, Forest City; 

Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh; 

Leslie H. Campbell, Buie's Creek; 

Clarence H. Patrick, Raleigh; 

R. H. Satterfield, Statesville; 

S. L. Morgan, Jr., Dunn; 

David K. Shelton, Wingate; 

A. B. Wood, Charlotte; 

O. D. Moore, Lincolnton; 

J. P. Morgan, Durham; 

Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh; 

Miss Thelma Patrick, High Point. 

Song: "Blessed Assurance" 

20. Thane McDonald, Director of Music at Wake Forest College, 
presented and accompanied at the piano the Wake Forest quartet 
composed of Kenneth Wilson, First Tenor; Tommy Stapleton, Second 
Tenor; Jason Ross, Baritone; and, Carlyle Morris, Bass, who sang 
the following numbers: "God of Our Fathers," "My Lord What a 
Morning," and "I've Been Listening." The closing number was a 
"Response" written by Director McDonald. 

21. In behalf of the Woman's Missionary Union Mrs. J. S. Farmer, 
Raleigh, presided during the consideration of the report on the 
Woman's Missionary Union. Miss Ruth Province, Raleigh, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Woman's Missionary Union, was associated 
with Mrs. Farmer in presenting the report. 

M. T. Rankin, Executive Secretary, Foreign Mission Board, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, brought the special message prior to the adoption 
of the report which follows: 

REPORT OF WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Auxiliary to Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 

Another year of service is ended, and we, your Auxiliary, come 
with thanksgiving to make our annual report. We are making this 
report from our beautiful, spacious new offices, for which we are 
grateful. It is wonderful to have space for our expanding work. 

Miss Hilda Mayo, Young People's Secretary, came in May and is 
leading our young people in a splendid way. Mrs. R. K. Redwine, 
Training School Trustee, resigned early in the year, and Mrs. David 
F. Boyd, of Charlotte, was elected to succeed her. Mrs. D. H. Craver, 



of North Carolina 49 

of Boonville, succeeds Mrs. W. E. White as Community Missions 
Chairman. We appreciate the efficient service of the retiring officers 
and heartily welcome the new ones. 

Mrs. M. A. Huggins, Stewardship Chairman, and Mrs. Gordon 
Maddrey, Mission Study Chairman, have given unsparingly of their 
time and strength and remarkable results have come to pass. Mrs. 
L. R. Harrill continues lovingly to look after the welfare of the Mar- 
garet Fund students in North Carolina schools. We rejoice that 
Campbell McMillan, of Wake Forest, is a recipient of the Elizabeth 
Lowndes Scholarship award this session. 

Mr. B. W. Jackson is leading the Royal Ambassadors into fields of 
great usefulness. 

Miss Ora Alford untiringly and accurately keeps our increasing 
financial records, having at her finger tips the record of the gifts of 
every organization in the State. Miss Mabel Baucom and Miss Joseph- 
ine Wood, our stenographers, help Miss Alford and the Secretaries, 
in every phase of our work. 

The Annual Meeting in March, featuring the Ruby Anniversary of 
Young Woman's Auxiliary and of the W.M.U. training school, was 
truly a mountain-top experience. We met in Asheville, the hospitable 
mountain city; all reports reached higher peaks than ever before; 
missionaries representing seven fields, Dr. M. T. Rankin and other 
guest speakers led us to heights of inspiration that we seldom realize. 
Never before have we had such a record of gifts; $821,800.17 for 1946; 
for the fourth quarter of 1946 and the first three quarters of 1947, we 
have a record of $774,512.06. 

The Divisional and Associational Conferences and annual meet- 
ings, the Young People's Rallies, all showed careful and wise plan- 
ning. We cannot say too much in appreciation of the increasingly 
large and efficient volunteer leadership in our State. 

For the lovely new Assembly Grounds at Fruitland we are deeply 
grateful. The W.M.S. week there was well attended; the program was 
worshipful, informative, and inspirational. Under the leadership of 
our Young People's Secretary and the Royal Ambassador Secretary, 
around 950 young people were reached in the State Intermediate 
Camps: one Royal Ambassador Camp at Campbell College, two at 
Fruitland; two Girls' Auxiliary Camps at Meredith, two at Fruit- 
land. How can we adequately describe in limited space the increas- 
ingly fruitful Divisional and Associational Junior Camps? In many 
of these Miss Laura Frances Snow, Summer Field Worker, rendered 
fine service. 

All over our State goes Mrs. John Wacaster, our happy-hearted, 
friendly Field Representative. She loves the Lord and loves His 
children, and is ideally fitted for the work she does. Her reports to 
the Executive Committee, the Council, the Annual Meeting, are 
bright spots always. 



50 Baptist State Convention 

The Union is entering wholeheartedly into the One Million Prayer 
League, sponsored by Southern Baptist leaders. We are also en- 
deavoring to secure our proportion of the 1,000,000 tithers sought 
by the Southern Baptist Convention. 

To Mr. Huggins and the General Board we are grateful for sympa- 
thetic cooperation in our every effort. 

With courage and with joy we set our faces to the New Year of 
service pledging to you and to our Heavenly Father that we shall do 
our utmost to be faithful stewards of the rich heritage and mani- 
fold blessings that are ours. We shall pray and serve and give in 
order that "at the name of Jesus every knee should bow." (Phil. 
2:10.) 

Foy J. Farmer, President, 

Ruth Provence, Executive Secretary. 

22. J. C. Canipe, Hendersonville. Secretary of Evangelism of 
the Convention, made special announcement of the statewide con- 
ferences on Evangelism to be held in Raleigh on February 9-11, 
1948. 

23. The Session adjourned following the closing prayer by Miss 
Ruth Province, Raleigh. 

TUESDAY— Evening Session 

24. Paul Lupo, Winston-Salem, Organist of the host church, as- 
sisted the Director of Music, Rommie Pierce, and Pianist Miss Dina 
Dominguez, in leading the music for this evening session. 

25. The first song, "We are Marching to Zion," preceded the de- 
votion brought by R. Talmadge Smith, Henderson. 

26. Under miscellaneous business, Yancey C. Elliott, Sanford, 
Chairman of the Committee on Resolutions reported favorably 
the following resolution involving a lease with the option to pur- 
chase certain property in Chapel Hill, and upon his motion it was 
adopted: 

TO LEASE WITH OPTION TO PURCHASE CHAPEL HILL 

PROPERTY 

Whereas the General Board has authorized a lease on what is 
known as the Roberson property located on Columbia Street in 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, for one year, ending September 30, 
1948, with an option to buy said property at 835,000 at any time 
within that period, and 

Whereas it appears wise to many individual Baptists, who are 
interested in extending the work among the Baptist students at 
Chapel Hill, to purchase said property, if the money can be secured 
largely from alumni of the University of North Carolina and other 
interested friends, 

NOW THEREFORE,. BE IT RESOLVED that the Convention ap- 
point a committee of seven, and that this committee undertake to 



of North Carolina 51 

raise the needed amount as soon as possible; certainly before the 
date that the present lease expires. 

27. Chairman Elliott again reported favorably as required under 
the Constitution, for the first passage, the resolution with an option 
to purchase the property located at 304 North Tryon Street, Char- 
lotte, and upon his motion, it was adopted. The Resolution follows: 

TO LEASE WITH OPTION TO PURCHASE CHARLOTTE 

PROPERTY 

Whereas the General Board has leased the building in Charlotte, 
located at 304 North Tryon Street, with an option to buy, and 

Whereas it appears to be wise to purchase the property, inasmuch 
as it has high rental value, and at the same time money can be 
secured at a low rate of interest, 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED 

1. That the General Board, or its Executive Committee, be author- 
ized to purchase said property at a cost of about $95,000.00, in- 
cluding repairs and alterations made on the building. 

2. That the Trustees of the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina, a corporation, be authorized and instructed to take title 
to said property when purchased. 

3. That the General Board, or its Executive Committee, be author- 
ized and instructed to negotiate a loan in an amount not to exceed 
$95,000.00; that an amount not to exceed $60,000.00 of the total 
amount borrowed be secured by a first mortgage on the property, 
and that the remainder of the full amount, $35,000.00, be borrowed 
on an open note; that the said trustees be authorized and instructed 
to execute and secure the loan. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the terms and payments on 
said loan, including the mortgage loan and the open note, shall 
be substantially as follows: 

The loan shall extend for a period of about eight years, with 
an interest rate of 3 per cent, and payments on the principal shall 
be substantially as follows: 

1948 $ 6,000.00 

1949 6,000.00 

1950 10,000.00 

1951 13,000.00 

1952 15,000.00 

1953 15,000.00 

1954 15,000.00 

1955 .— . 15,000.00 



$95,000.00 



52 Baptist State Convention 

28. A special report from the Radio Committee was presented 
by L. J. Morris, Raleigh. The report which follows was accepted 
as a matter of information and the Convention authorized the con- 
tinuance of the Radio Committee as now constituted with instruc- 
tions that they continue a further study of the radio needs of the 
Convention and make their report and recommendations to the 
January 1948 meeting of the General Board. 



REPORT OF THE RADIO COMMITTEE 

The task of the Radio Committee is of the first magnitude, not 
only as to the amount of work involved in an investigation of this 
nature, but also as to the nature of the recommendations to the 
Baptists of North Carolina which will affect the program and work 
of our denomination for generations to come. It is hard for the 
public to conceive and accept the vastness of the opportunity in 
the field of religious education through the medium of radio. Thus 
the Committee has sought to awaken and arouse our people to the 
fact that today we stand on the threshold of a new era in informing 
our people, proclaiming our faith, and enlightening the thinking 
of mankind. With this in mind, we present the findings of this 
Committee to the Baptist State Convention. 

In January, the Committee recommended to the General Board 
the cost of establishing an FM station with cost indicated at ap- 
proximately $35,000. The annual cost of upkeep including personnel 
was not made clear. Therefore, the matter was referred to the 
Committee for further study, and that Committee in cooperation 
with the Executive Committee of the Convention was given power 
to act. At a subsequent meeting of the Executive Committee and 
the Radio Committee with the General Secretary, authority was 
granted to proceed with the filing of an application for a 1 kw station 
to be located in or near Raleigh. However, the Executive Committee 
authorized the General Secretary to employ an expert to study 
and investigate the matter further, setting forth the initial outlay 
and annual cost of same. At a meeting in June the expert was pre- 
sented and the concensus of opinion was that the establishment 
of a station at this time was not feasible. The whole matter was 
then resubmitted to the Radio Committee; and the Committee, in 
cooperation with the Executive Committee, was to present a report 
at the Pre-Convention meeting. Certain facts were lacking regard- 
ing the station and the transcription facilities for the purpose of 
providing churches and stations with available programs and was 
carried over for further study. The Committee was requested to 
report to the General Board in January, 1948. 

The above paragraphs indicate the nature of the work and recom- 
mendations of the Committee on Radio. However, the survey of 
the present situation, practices, and opportunities in the field of 



of North Carolina 53 

Radio are not set forth in this abbreviated report. In order that 
our people may know something of the nature of this problem, the 
possibilities that might be ours, we present the following facts as 
gathered and compiled by the members of the Radio Committee. 

There are at present 18 FM stations on the air in North Carolina, 
with ten more being constructed. It will mean that in four months 
from date, North Carolina will have 28 FM stations on the air with 
fulltime service and statewide coverage assured by December 1, 
1947. The Dixie Network has just recently been organized among 
the commercial stations for state-wide coverage and 12 hour opera- 
tion. One city reports that over 3,000 Pilotuners (a device that 
may be attached to radios without FM bands for FM reception and 
priced at a nominal sum) were sold in that locality. This does not 
include all sets sold which have the FM bands. Due to the large 
number of sets in use, most stations are already selling time on 
their FM outlets. By the beginning of the new year there will be 
more FM stations on the air than there were regular broadcast 
stations before the war. Frequency Modulation is here to stay. 

The coverage by FM has surpassed all expectations, not only so 
far as quality is concerned, but also as to the distance covered by 
the signal. A qualified engineer recently pointed out that three 
5 kw stations would give adequate coverage for North Carolina 
and parts of the surrounding states. It has also been pointed out 
that facsimile — the transmission of the printed and illustrated 
page— is being set up in North Carolina. Thus another phase of 
Christian work could be enhanced by the application of facsimile 
in providing the best of materials in the educational field for our 
workers. The FM signal serves as a basis of transmission not only 
for voice, but picture as well. 

This leads us to the description of the greatest of all fields of op- 
portunity for leading and teaching; namely, television. Many be- 
lieve that this great invention is only a dream. Herein we are 
sadly mistaken — television has passed the early experimental stage 
and is fast becoming the • giant in the field of radio. Here again 
the FM signal serves as a basis of transmission for both voice and 
picture. At present, the people of all the major cities of our nation 
are enjoying the greatest advance ever made in radio. Television 
receivers are about as common on the markets of New York as 
FM sets are in North Carolina. Too, these sets are priced within 
the range of the average buyer in the field of radio. Some sets 
are selling now as low as $150. We had the privilege of viewing 
television this past summer and are of the opinion that television 
is excellent, and definitely on its way into the homes of the American 
people. The co-axial cables necessary to carry both sound and 
picture for the major networks are already being installed and 
have passed through North Carolina. One of the major networks 
has made use of not only the black and white, but also has suc- 
cessfully brought color to the screen of the set in the home; thus 
adding beauty and splendor to its message. Many firms where 



54 Baptist State Convention 

large groups gather frequently have installed large screens similar 
to those used by the theater. This means that within a few years 
there is the possibility of bringing into the smallest church in our 
Convention a complete, well planned program of evangelism, plus 
a comprehensive coverage of our Baptist life and institutions. As 
we have transcription libraries as present, so in the years to come 
we have film libraries of sight and sound ready for programming 
in proclaiming the Gospel to all people. 

In thinking of the opportunities that radio affords, it is imperative 
that we see this phase of our work, not as an "extra" to diminish 
or supplement our program, but as an "arm" of the church co- 
ordinating and integrating all experiences in a united and concerted 
effort to win men to Christ and to strengthen converts to "grow 
in the grace and knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ!" Too long 
radio has served as an "extra," rather than an "intra." This fact 
is shown in the type of radio programs that are now on the air. Other 
than the eleven o'clock hour given by many stations now on the air — 
for which we as Baptists are grateful — most programs are sponsored 
by groups or individuals who do not seek the promotion of the 
church. Many of these groups play a "lone wolf" hand, never 
seeking to promote the churches and their programs, but rather 
desiring to draw upon the resources of its members for their own 
profit or glory. The majority of the churches of our Convention 
have members who regularly support these "extra" programs with 
a part of their tithe or offering. Another fact worthy of note here 
is that these are churches of the Convention that contribute regu- 
larly to the support of these programs. These facts present further 
proof that unless the Baptists seek to offer the best in religious 
education over the air, that we may expect a continued support 
by individuals, groups, and even churches of the programs now on 
the air. 

Religion has had to take a back seat as far as radio is concerned 
due to the fact that a majority of these programs are of such an 
inferior nature that many of the stations, rightly so, have been 
forced to cancel the time given or sold. The result has been that the 
public has formed a conception of the Christian program and its 
leaders on the same level and plane of the broadcasting that has 
come into their homes. Many campaigns have been initiated by 
groups to stamp out this type of program, but in turn have failed 
to present something better in its stead. People will listen to their 
radios. They will listen to the best. Unless we seek to provide the 
best in the field of religion, we must be willing and expect the masses 
of people to listen to the second or third best in radio. 

In reaching people to inform them, and in molding public opinion, 
there is no greater channel than radio today. The lives of thousands 
of people daily are influenced. The entire personality of an indi- 
vidual is influenced, either toward unification or vice versa. The 
Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness in their report 
to the Convention pointed out this very fact, when they stated that 



of North Carolina 55 

"radio stories often play around disharmony, family trouble, divorce, 
etc., yet in the end 'all is well', not telling the whole story of heart- 
aches, tears, agony of the soul, and sometimes the utter disruption 
of personality." Delinquency among children may be traced in 
part or in its entirity in some cases to the effect of radio stories of 
an inferior nature. The issue at stake demands not so many reso- 
lutions that may have been passed by the priest and Levite as 
a result of their experience with a wounded man on the road to 
Jericho, but clear thinking on the part of the Baptists of North 
Carolina and a long range plan that not only creates a desire within 
the breast of every man for something better, but provides the 
food for that desire once it has been created. This should be a 
"must" on the list of Baptist needs. 

A vast number of opportunities await us in the field of radio. 
Among the secondary possibilities — the proclamation of the Gospel 
being primary — we come face to face with a challenge to lift the 
standards of music. Recently one musician made the statement 
that unless there was a swing of the pendulum in the opposite direc- 
tion, that the average American youth would not be able to recog- 
nize or produce a perfect note within ten years. The great hymns 
of the church along with the classics have their place in a Christian 
society. Today many stations that have been broadcasting this type 
program have eliminated it from their schedule due to the fact that 
practically no one listens — ten righteous listeners cannot be found 
to save the program. In the field of dramatics, the criminal and 
his enhanced span of life has taken over many of the preferable 
listening hours on radio. Among children there is an imitator of 
just about every character in every block. The power of suggestion 
on the part of such programs is powerful and the results are amaz- 
ing. These are just a few of the brackets in radio where foresight 
and outlook are greatly needed. 

Finally, the opportunity is ours as well as the possibility. Your 
committee has worked faithfully and believe that the cost becomes 
insignificant in the light of the possibilities for the people of our 
State. Now is the time! The vision is ours if we possess it. A mighty 
arm of our denomination awaits its total acceptance by the Baptists 
of our Convention. Dare we accept the challenge? 

Respectfully submitted, 
The Radio Committee, 

L. J. Morriss, Chairman, 
Wilbur Hutchins, 
J. Winston Pearce, 
A. B. Wood, 
Glenn Blackburn, 
Thane McDonald. 



56 Baptist State Convention 

29. A special solo selection was rendered at this time by Miss 
Mary Lou Rainey, Fayetteville, who sang, "He Shall Feed His 
Flock." 

30. General Secretary M. A. Huggins introduced the discussion 
of the State Mission Hour. The program which follows covering 
the many fields of endeavor of State Missions was presented orally 
by the various speakers indicated below assisted by Fon H. Scofield, 
Jr., Wake Forest, Secretary of Visual Aid, Radio and Publicity, 
by Visual Aids and Transcriptions. 

STATE MISSION HOUR 

General Introduction M. A. Huggins 

Missionary Background and History 

Fon H. Scofield, Wake Forest 
Earle L. Bradley in Charge, Raleigh 

1. Pastoral Assistance, Purchase of Lots, and New Churches 

R. L. Hughes, Asheboro 

2. Sunday Schools .....Mrs. Myra Motley, Raleigh 

3. Training Union. .....Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh 

4. Student Union James Ray, Raleigh 

5. Evangelism J. C. Canipe, Hendersonville 

6. Visual Education .....Fon H. Scofield, Wake Forest 

7. Sanatoriums (4 Pictures) Wilbur Huneycutt, Black Mountain 

8. Allied Church League... L. A. Martin, Lexington 

9. Indian Work Harvey Brewington, Pembroke 

10. Cooperative Work With Negro Convention 

Earle L. Bradley, Raleigh 

11. Summer Student Work G. W. Bullard, Raleigh 

12. Baptist Book Store Miss Mary Ascue, Raleigh 

Miss Evelyn Hampton, Charlotte 

13. Pastors' Schools and Fruitland Baptist Bible Inst. 

J. C. Pipes, Asheville 

14. Summer Assemblies E. L. Spivey, Charlotte 

31. From the screen the audience sang "Jesus Shall Reign" after 
which E. Lowell Spivey, Charlotte, Field Secretary, introduced a 
discussion of the Cooperative Program. 

He was followed by Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill, on the subject 
"The What and How of It." 

Charles E. Parker, Franklin, was introduced and was to have 
brought the closing theme, "Support of It Through Tithes and Of- 
ferings." He announced that he would not speak in view of the 
lateness of the hour. 

32. The Session closed with prayer offered by Preston Vann, 
Charlotte. 



of North Carolina 57 

WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

33. With the singing of "Holy, Holy, Holy" the Convention con- 
vened at 9:30 with Woodrow W. Hill, Albemarle, bringing the 
devotion. This was followed by a song, "I Need Thee Every Hour." 

34. Under miscellaneous items R. K. Redwine, Hickory, having 
on the day previous given notice as required by the Constitution, 
moved and the Convention approved an Amendment to the Consti- 
tution as follows: "Any person who has served not longer than 
one year of any unexpired term is eligible to succeed himself." This 
statement is to appear as the last sentence of Subsection 1 under 
Section A, Article VIII of the Constitution. 

35. W. Perry Crouch, Asheville, requested recognition and 
pointed out that this year marked the fifteenth consecutive year 
that M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, had served as General Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Convention. In addition to the words of apprecia- 
tion the Convention approved the recommendation that a Com- 
mittee composed of W. Perry Crouch, Asheville, Clyde A. Baucom, 
Wilson, and B. E. Morris, Durham, be authorized to purchase and 
present in behalf of the Convention a gift as a token of appreciation 
for the long years of service of the General Secretary and Treas- 
urer. 

36. E. Norfleet Gardner, Henderson, presented the following 
resolution from the Tar River Baptist Association on the subject 
of Temperance Lessons, which was referred to the Committee on 
Resolutions: 

RESOLUTION ON TEMPERANCE LESSONS 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Convention in each and all of its 
annual sessions for many years has declared its uncompromising 
opposition to beverage alcohol, and has appealed to its constituents 
to oppose this evil by all means available; and 

Whereas, at its ninetieth session, which was held in St. Louis, 
Mo., May 7-11, 1947, our Convention adopted the report of its Social 
Service Committee which included in its practical suggestions on 
"how to work for temperance and the abolition of beverage alcohol," 
the following recommendation: "urge the Sunday School Board 
to continue its emphasis on regular temperance lessons and to make 
available for teachers with each temperance lesson more concrete 
information on conditions, tendencies, gains and losses in the strug- 
gle for a sober nation"; and 

Whereas, the language quoted from the report of the Social 
Service Committee will cause the uninformed to believe that our 
Sunday School Board has continued the regular presentation of 
the temperance lessons, while it is a matter of fact and of record 
that the regular quarterly temperance lesson was abolished more 
than 2 years ago; and 



58 Baptist State Convention 

Whereas, since its abolition only occasional, irregular and in- 
adequate lessons on this deadly evil have been included in our lesson 
helps; and 

Whereas, there is every good reason to believe that if such a 
lesson as was abolished should now be restored and taught by our 
more than 200,000 Sunday School teachers above the Primary 
grade, it would be the most effective means of cooperating with 
our Southern Baptist Convention on this vital matter, and 

Whereas, we believe the abolition of the regular quarterly tem- 
perance lesson by our Sunday School Board was ill-advised, un- 
justified and is a weakening of our opposition to beverage alcohol; 
it is hereby 

Resolved, that the Tar River Baptist Association, representing 
60 churches and 14,000 Baptists, in its 117th annual session now 
assembled, hereby records its approval of the wise and timely 
recommendation of our Social Service Committee on this great 
evil, and its adoption by our Southern Baptist Convention. 

And we hereby instruct our messengers to the next annual session 
of our State Convention to bring this important matter to its at- 
tention by requesting said Convention to remind our Sunday School 
Board of the action of the Southern Baptist Convention on this 
matter, and urge our Sunday School Board to restore the much 
needed regular quarterly temperance lesson which was taught in 
our Sunday Schools through so many years, and without which 
the members of our Sunday schools are now receiving only irregular 
and inadequate help in our efforts to comply with the declared 
intent and purpose of our Southern Baptist Convention as indicated 
by its adoption of the report of the Social Service Committee. 

37. The New Orleans Seminary furnished for this Convention 
the speaker to bring the mesage in support of the seminaries. This 
address was brought by President Roland Q. Leavell, New Orleans. 
H. C. Goerner, representing the Southern Baptist Theological Semi- 
nary at Louisville, Kentucky, and John A. Barry, Jr., representing 
the Southwestern Seminary at Fort Worth, Texas, were introduced 
to the Convention. 

38. Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro, acting as Vice-Chairman of 
the Board of Directors of the Biblical Recorder presented the Report 
of the Biblical Recorder which follows and upon his motion, it was 
adopted after the special message brought by the editor, L. L. 
Carpenter. 

REPORT OF DIRECTORS OF BIBLICAL RECORDER, INC. 

The Directors of Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, submit here- 
with to the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina their report 
for the year ended September 30, 1947. 

Two meetings of the Directors have been held. The first was on 
January 21, 1947, for the purpose of organization and making plans 



of North Carolina 59 

for the year. The second meeting was on October 21, 1947, for the 
purpose of reviewing the year's record, receiving and examining 
reports of the Business Manager and of the Auditors, and adopting 
this report to the Convention. The Executive Committee met three 
times in between the meetings of the Directors: once for passing on 
the matter of granting to the members of the Recorder staff "a cost 
of living supplement," and twice for counsel with the Editor and to 
consider necessary matters of business. 

In their recent meeting the Directors were pleased to observe 
the steady increase in the Biblical Recorder's circulation and income, 
as may be seen from the following statements: 

Circulation October 22, 1947 44,083 

Circulation, October 23, 1946 39,309 

Net Gain for the Year 4,774 

Breakdown of Circulation as of October 1, 1947: 

Club ($1.50 rate) 15,522 

Every-Family ($1.20 rate) 25,397 

Individuals, Pastors, Hospitals, Libraries, etc 3,108 

Total Circulation, October 1, 1947 44,027 

During the last five years the circulation has increased approxi- 
mately from 11,000 to 44,027. 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
12 Months Ended September 30, 1947 
RECEIPTS 

Advertising $10,705.19 

Circulation 62,824.04 

Sale of Cuts 332.29 

Baptist State Convention .. 1,000.00 

Miscellaneous 15.74 

Sale of Typewriters 150.00 



TOTAL RECEIPTS $75,027.26 

CASH AND BANK BALANCE, September 30, 1946 106.35 



TOTAL RECEIPTS AND BALANCE $75,133.61 

DISBURSEMENTS 

Advertising $ 593.81 

Print Paper 17,797.76 

Furniture and Fixtures Purchased 466.26 

Insurance 70.38 

Office Expense 584.41 

Printing Contract 30,181.46 

Drayage, Demurrage and Packing Paper... 121.00 
Additional Postage Deposit 45.06 



60 Baptist State Convention 

Rent 839.40 

Retirement Annuity 474.59 

Salaries 17,738.98 

Telephone 197.80 

Travel 1,630.45 

Unremitted Withholding Tax Sept. 30, 1946 179.70 

Miscellaneous 569.63 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS $74,812.72 

CASH AND BANK BALANCE, Sept. 30, 1947 320.89 



TOTAL ACCOUNTED FOR... $74,133.61 

Postage Expense 3,322.03 

The following statement is taken from the audit made by A. T. 
Allen & Company, Certified Public Accountants: 

"We found the books in balance and excellently kept. Trial 
balances and financial and operating statements are being regu- 
larly prepared. 

"Our examination did not disclose any evidence of irregu- 
larities and we believe the funds have been carefully and 
honestly handled and all accounted for. 

"We hereby certify that, we have audited the books and 
records of the Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, Raleigh, North 
Carolina, as of September 30, 1947, and prepared the within 
statements. In our opinion the correct financial condition of the 
business is shown, together with the result of operations for the 
twelve months ended at that time." 

Total receipts for year ending September 30, 1946, were $64,- 
445.51; for this year, $75,027.26, a net increase of $10,581.73; but of 
this amount $1,000 came from the Convention. During the past year 
the cost of print paper, over which the Board of Directors has no 
control, has greatly increased, the price now being approximately 
100 per cent higher than two or three years ago. Other increasing 
costs which we have had to face include our printing contract, our 
salary schedule, and other necessary items. 

There is still an acute shortage of print paper. It has been more 
difficult to get enough paper this year than last, so that we have even 
had to reduce the size of the Recorder to eight pages four times; but 
we have the assurance that we can get enough paper to run sixteen 
pages the rest of this year, and it is expected that sometime in 1948 
we shall be able to get all the paper we need. We hope that we shall 
not be disappointed in this expectation for 1948. Our readers can 
rest assured that we will do the very best we can as to the size of the 
Recorder and we expect to go back to twenty-four pages when 
enough paper is available. 

From the report of the Editor we note that he has filled Sunday 
engagements during the year in approximately twenty-five churches, 
attended fifteen associational meetings, conducted one revival, 



of North Carolina 61 

directed two Better Bible Teaching Clinics, assisted in one Training 
Union and one Mission Study week, attended several conferences 
and conventions, including the Baptist World Alliance Congress in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, and filled many other special and important 
engagements. 

The Directors desire to express to the Convention their apprecia- 
tion of the work which has been done by Dr. Carpenter and the 
members of the office staff, and by the Bynum Printing Company 
in keeping the Biblical Recorder going regularly to its grow- 
ing constituency in spite of the continued paper shortage and other 
difficulties. The Directors also wish to commend the Editor for his 
wise selection of the material to be published and solicit for him 
the sympathy of our people in this task which is made more difficult 
by the paper shortage. The Directors also wish to commend the 
Editor, the General Secretary of the Convention and members of his 
staff, numerous pastors, and other workers in the churches for their 
excellent work in enabling the Recorder to extend its usefulness to 
an ever increasing number of people. We note, however, that the 
Recorder even now does not go into more than one-third of the 
Baptist homes of North Carolina. 

The Directors, therefore, call upon pastors, denominational work- 
ers, and local church officers to assist in every proper way to extend 
the blessings of the Recorder to all the members of all our churches. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. We recommend that the Convention go on record as favoring 
the Every-Family Plan for subscriptions to the Recorder, and that 
all pastors and church leaders be urged to support this plan and help 
place the paper in every Baptist home in North Carolina. 

2. We consider it good policy to keep the subscription rates low so 
as to get the Recorder into as many homes as possible and yet 
produce a paper of high quality. Therefore, since the price for sub- 
scriptions on the Club and the Every-Family Plans is below the cost 
of production, we recommend that the General Board be authorized 
and empowered to extend aid to the Biblical Recorder during 1948 
in order to increase the circulation through the Club and the 
Every-Family Plans and at the same time hold the cost to the sub- 
scribers at a figure as low as possible; and that the amount of aid, 
and the basis upon which it shall be granted, be left to the General 
Board in its January, 1948, meeting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Wilson Woodcock, Vice Chairman. 

39. Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, requested recognition and 
paid a brief tribute to the late Carl M. Townsend, Raleigh, and 
thereafter made a motion which was approved that the 1948 Annual 
be dedicated to Carl M. Townsend and the late United States Sena- 
tor, Josiah W. Bailey, Raleigh. 



62 Baptist State Convention 

Song: "Majestic Sweetness Sits Enthroned" 

40. A report was received from the Directors of the North Caro- 
lina Baptist Foundations, Incorporated,* through T. S. Johnson, Ra- 
leigh, and upon his motion adopted in words and figures as follows: 

ANNUAL REPORT 
NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATIONS, INC. 

On September 25, 1947 the North Carolina Baptist Foundation, 
was administering trust funds in the total amount of $214,975,12 
which includes $4,834.68. Cash balances in principal and income 
accounts received but either not yet reinvested or expended to bene- 
ficiaries as of the date of the report. 

The assets of the Foundation can be classified as follows: 

Real Estate $ 10,000.00 

Building and Loan Stock. 900.00 

Preferred Corporation Stock 16,978.25 

Common Stock 22,488.30 

Notes secured by deeds of trust (4%) 10,000.00 

Notes secured by deeds of trust (5%) 4,970.26 

Notes secured by deeds of trust (6%) 2,500.00 

U. S. Bonds (2%) 64,029.04 

U. S. Bonds (2V 4 %) 22,849.85 

U. S. Bonds (2%) 2,805.69 

Miscellaneous Bonds and Debentures 52,619.05 

Cash principal balances 2,025.88 

Cash Income Balance 2,808.80 

TOTAL $214,975.12 

The total gross income from these funds amounted to $6,502.98. 
Of this amount, $4,661.50 was paid out to beneficiaries. In addition 
the sum of $5,152.34 which was received as income was invested in 
U. S. bonds and added to the principal of two funds. 

The following expenses were paid: 

Taxes on Real Estate , $ 55.61 

Insurance Premiums 10.00 

General Expense 0.34 

Accrued Interest Charges 60.74 

Commission to Fiscal Agent 325.17 

TOTAL $451.86 

The trust funds of the Foundation are arranged in groups accord- 
ing to the purposes for which the various trusts were established. 
The funds are as follows: 

General Fund $ 4,372.34 

Aged Ministers Relief 58,360.24 

Baptist Orphanage 32,190.14 



of North Carolina 63 

Roanoke Association Missions — Noah Biggs 4,500.00 

Church Building — Roanoke Assoc. Noah Biggs.... 5,000.00 

Ministerial Education 2,325.60 

State Missions 59,291.40 

Carried Forward $166,039.72 

Brought forward $166,039.72 

Meredith College Loan Fund 6,023.34 

Southern Baptist Con. Orphanage and 

Foreign Mission 8,600.00 

Gethsemane Baptist Church 2,411.25 

Education Fund 7,410.06 

Gardner-Webb Ministerial Fund 735.88 

Bridges Fund 400.00 

State Missions C.O.L. Pittman 2,497.50 

W.M.U. Scholarship Fund 5,898.19 

Clement Baptist Church 4,012.00 

Medical Dept. — Wake Forest College 1,500.00 

Pilot Baptist Church 4,612.50 

TOTAL $210,140.44 

Since the close of the fiscal year 1941 the assets of the Foundation 
have increased from the sum of $148,398.90 to a total of $212,166.32. 
In this same period the income collected has varied from a maximum 
of $6,797.56 to a minimum of $5,913.99 averaging $6,312.51 or 3.7% 
of the assets, excepting $10,000 in Real Estate producing no income. 

The rate of yield has declined during the last seven years from 
4.8% in 1941 to 3.2% in the year just ended, a trend common to 
all invested funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 
R. D. Beam, Secretary. 

41. President Warren at this time called for the election of officers 
and took this opportunity to voice his feelings of gratitude and 
appreciation for the honor and the opportunity given him to serve 
as President. 

Nominations were then received for President and the following 
nominations were made: 

R. Archie Ellis, Salisbury, nominated John W. Suttle, Shelby; 
H. G. Hammett, Durham, nominated F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh; and 
Julian S. Hopkins, High Point, nominated Ralph A. Herring, Wins- 
ton-Salem. It was the desire of Ralph A. Herring that his nomi- 
nation be withdrawn pointing out that he served as President 
during the years 1944 and 1945. E. C. Shoe, Taylorsville, moved 
and the nominations closed. Under unanimous consent the Con- 
vention agreed to vote by standing. Upon vote the Convention 
elected John W. Suttle, Shelby, as President, and his election was 
made unanimous upon the motion of T. H. King, Wilmington. 



64 Baptist State Convention 

For First Vice President the following were nominated: 
F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh 
Donald G. Myers, Wadesboro 
R. Archie Ellis, Salisbury 
C. Sylvester Greene, Durham 
Grover H. Jones, High Point 

Again by standing vote the Convention elected F. Orion Mixon 
as First Vice President. 

For Second Vice President the following were nominated: 
M. L. Banister, Oxford 
A. B. Wood, Charlotte 
Lee Pridgen, Louisburg 

Upon standing vote H. L. Banister, Oxford, was elected Second 
Vice President. 

For Third Vice President the following were nominated: 
W. Shelley Caudle, Stovall 
R. R. Jackson, Wake Forest 
W. C. Reed, Kinston 
Homer O. Baker, Charlotte 

Upon standing vote and the second ballot W. C. Reed, Kinston, 
was elected as Third Vice President. 

42. Nominations were next received for Recording Secretary 
and Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest, requested recognition and in nomi- 
nating Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, for reelection as Recording 
Secretary stated that he felt he voiced the feelings of the Conven- 
tion in expressing the appreciation of the Convention for the services 
of the present Secretary who had served continuously since 1932. 
The election was made by acclamation upon motion by Preston 
Vann, Charlotte. 

43. Under the direction of Miss Beatrice Donnelly of Meredith 
College, Raleigh, the Meredith Choral Group sang the following 
numbers: "Never Jesus Will I Leave," "Lift Thine Eyes," and 
"Open Mine Eyes." 

44. "Triumphing by the Holy Spirit" was the theme of the address 
of R. G. Lee, Memphis, Tennessee, which brought to a close this 
Session, following prayer by the speaker. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

45. On reconvening the audience sang "Lead On Oh King Eternal" 
followed by devotion offered by J. Clarence Jones, Newell. 

46. Next claiming the attention of the Convention was a report 
of the Committee on the Convention's Plan for Wake Forest. The 
first address on the enlarged program for Wake Forest was brought 
by Horace Easom, Shelby, Director of the Convention's Plan. He 
submitted a brief report of the Committee of 17 as a matter of 
information : 



of North Carolina 65 

The Convention's Program For Wake Forest College To Raise 
One and One-half Million Dollars Through The Churches began 
on July 1, 1947. Horace Easom was employed by the Committee 
of Seventeen and began making plans as State Director on June 
1, 1947. 

Sixty-one of the sixty-eight associations are organized or are 
in the process of organization. The organization being used is an 
Associational Chairman, Associational Committee, and a Convention 
Committee in each church. For instance, an association with forty 
churches has an organization with a personnel of two hundred 
eighty-seven individuals. 

The churches have been very cooperative, enthusiastic, and en- 
couraging in launching this program and in doing their part to 
make it a success. 

The Director has driven 14,893 miles in doing organizational work 
in various sections of North Carolina. 

Reports from associations and churches are coming in regularly. 

Based upon reports from forty Associational Chairmen and many 
individual churches to date, we have the reasonable assurance that 
509 churches have underwritten a total of $1,116,281.64. The Direc- 
tor has the names and amounts of these churches in hand. Other 
churches will be reporting regularly. 

The word "underwritten" means that a church has agreed to 
pay a certain amount to this program. The words "reasonable as- 
surance" mean that the Finance Committee or Board of Deacons 
have recommended a certain amount to a church and it has been 
accepted by such church; or that the pastor and a group of members 
from a church have given the assurance that their church would 
pay a certain amount. 

The schedule calls for money to begin coming in to M. A. Huggins, 
Treasurer, in November. A few churches have already sent in 
a total of $20,020.93. This enabled us to launch the program without 
borowing any money. 

The total amount of expenses thus far in setting up and launching 
this program throughout the state totals $9,540.83. 

The Director wishes to express deep appreciation to the pastors, 
divisional, associational and resident chairman, the staff of the 
Convention, associational missionaries and everyone who has had 
a part. 

The next message on the Wake Forest Program was brought by 
J. Melville Broughton, Raleigh. 

47. Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, as Chairman of the Com- 
mittee of 15, whose task was to consider various possibilities for 
the disposal of the property of Wake Forest College, brought the 
following report which was approved by the Convention: 



66 Baptist State Convention 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE OF 15 

The Committee of 15 was appointed at the Asheville Convention 
"to consider various possibilities for the disposal of the property 
of Wake Forest College after the removal of the school to Winston- 
Salem." Everyone who was present then sensed the heavy responsi- 
bility of this assignment. I dare say, however, that even the 
members of the committee themselves did not fully appreciate this 
responsibility until their first meeting in Raleigh, N. C, on January 
20, when they came face to face with the far reaching consequences 
of any action they might propose. After canvassing thoroughly 
the opinions represented by those present and after prayerful 
deliberation it was decided to meet again at the First Baptist Church 
in Greensboro and to have a public hearing where all interested 
individuals and institutions might present either by letter or in 
person their suggestions for the best disposition of the college prop- 
erty at Wake Forest. 

This second meeting at Greensboro, March 4, was well attended 
and your committee was encouraged by the number of suggestions 
presented during the morning session. Some of these were con- 
tained in letters which were read, others were presented in person, 
all of them were sympathetically received and carefully considered. 
The Convention may be interested in hearing the various proposals 
advanced. As best I can summarize them they are as follows: That 
the site be made jointly a retreat for advanced learning and a home 
for the aged — including retired missionaries; that it be used for 
a "first class Intermediate School" for boys; that Meredith College 
be moved to Wake Forest, N. C, and that the present property at 
Meredith be offered to the Southern Baptist Convention for a Semi- 
nary, with any extra acreage offered for sale; that Campbell, 
Chowan, and Wingate Junior colleges be combined to establish a 
"great Junior College" at Wake Forest, N. C; that it be offered for 
sale to the Southern Baptist Convention for a Southeastern Semi- 
nary with schools in theology, religious education, and church 
music. 

After the suggestions were made the committee met in closed 
sessions to consider them. At this time it was learned that the 
Executive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention was pre- 
pared to recommend to the Convention in St. Louis that a com- 
mittee be appointed to study the advisability of establishing a 
Seminary in this general section of its territory. Feeling that it 
was likely the Southern Baptist Convention would act favorably 
on this recommendation, it was decided in that case to invite such 
a committee to meet with the Committee of 15 in a third session 
to be arranged if possible at Wake Forest. 

You are doubtless familiar with the fact that the Southern Baptist 
Convention acted favorably in this matter and has now a strong 
committee studying seriously the advisability of a Seminary in 
this section and also on the West Coast. 



of North Carolina 67 

On September 18, therefore, your committee had its third meet- 
ing, this time at Wake Forest. Present at this gathering were Dr. 
John Buchanan, president, and Dr. Wade Bryant of the Southern 
Committee, Dr. Duke McCall, executive secretary of the Executive 
Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, and others. Dis- 
cussion centered almost exclusively upon offering the Wake Forest 
site to Southern Baptists for a theological seminary. While no 
commitments were made by our visitors from the Southern Con- 
vention, their response was such that your committee concluded 
its meeting with the following unanimous recommendations: 

First, That the Wake Forest College property located at Wake 
Forest, N. C, be offered to the Southern Baptist Convention for a 
future site for a Seminary, subject to such financial terms as may 
be mutually agreed upon between the two Conventions. 

Second, That this committee be continued, or another appointed, 
to carry into effect the instructions of the Convention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

COMMITTEE OF 15, 

Ralph A. Herring, Chairman, 

J. Clyde Turner, 

Zeno Wall, 

F. Orion Mixon, 

S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., 

Clyde E. Baucom, 

H. G. Hammett, 

E. N. Gardner, 

W. Perry Crouch, 

James B. Turner, 

W. H Weatherspoon, 

Ronald E. Wall, 

R. Knolan Benfield, 

Edwin F. Perry, 

B. E. Morris. 

48. Upon motion by J. Ben Eller, Greensboro, the Committee of 
15 was continued and the Convention designated F. Orion Mixon, 
Raleigh, as a Member of the Committee to succeed the late Carl 
M. Townsend, Raleigh. 

49. A report was received from the Council on Christian Edu- 
cation made by the Chairman, C. Sylvester Green, Durham. (See 
Section III, Page 137). This report was followed by the intro- 
duction of the Presidents of the various colleges in this order: 
Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest; Carlyle Campbell, Meredith; 
Leslie H. Campbell, Campbell; Phil L. Elliott, Gardner-Webb; Hoyt 
Blackwell, Mars Hill; and in the absence of C. C. Burris, Wingate; 
detained because of illness, E. S. Summers, Concord, Chairman 
of the Board of Trustees of Wingate. 



68 Baptist State Convention 

Attention was called by Chairman Green to the faithful service 
being rendered by Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, Executive Secretary 
of the Council on Christian Education, and thereafter Fred B. Helms, 
Charlotte, brought the address on Christian Education. 

50. At approximately 4 o'clock the Convention adjourned, fol- 
lowing prayer by J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro, to visit the pro- 
posed site of Wake Forest College and the Medical Center to be 
erected at Renolda and Graylyn in Winston-Salem. 

WEDNESDAY— Evening Session 

51. Under the direction of Rommie Pierce, Wingate, Wingate 
Junior College Glee Club led the largest audience of any session 
in the singing of "He Leadeth Me." This was followed by the devo- 
tional and prayer by John L. Coley, Raleigh. 

52. Special guests of the Convention at this Session were some 
one hundred nurses from the Baptist Hospital. 

53. Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, read in behalf of the Trustees 
of the Convention the following report and upon his motion this 
report was adopted: 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST STATE 
CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The trustees of the Convention, as elected by the 1946 session of 
the Convention, are F. H. Brooks, P. H. Wilson and R. L. McMillan. 
F. H. Brooks is Chairman, and R. L. McMillan is Secretary. 

At a meeting held on May 1, 1947, the trustees, upon the advice 
of the Executive Committee of the General Board, passed a reso- 
lution authorizing the General Secretary to proceed with the pur- 
chase of the property known as the Alford property, located at 119 
Hillsboro Street, Raleigh, N. C, and to finance the purchase through 
a loan in an amount not to exceed $72,000; the officers of the cor- 
poration being instructed to take title to the property when pur- 
chased, and to sign whatever notes or papers necessary to effect 
the intent of the action. 

Further it was voted to assume the existing mortgage on the 
property in the amount of $60,000, payable $5,000 annually, with 
interest at 4 per cent. 

It was also voted that a loan of $12,000 should be procured for 
a period of time not to exceed three years, at an interest rate of 
3 per cent, the proceeds of the loan to be applied on the purchase 
price of the property, and on repairs and alterations of the building. 

Following this action a note in the amount of $10,000 was signed, 
same to be repaid during the period beginning August 1947 and 
ending in May 1950. 

It was also voted to deed certain property, held in the name of 
the Baptist State Mission Board, to the trustees of the Engelhard 
Church in Hyde County, which is located in the Chowan Association. 



of North Carolina 69 

It was also voted that certain lots in block No. 577 in Wilmington 
be sold in order that other and more desirable lots might be pur- 
chased. 

At a meeting held in the office of the General Secretary on No- 
vember 7, it was voted that title be taken to property deeded to 
the trustees by C. T. Evans of Davidson County, same to be held 
by the trustees for the use of the Union Grove Baptist Church, 
located in the Liberty Association so long as such church operates 
as a Missionary Baptist church. 

The Convention requires bonds of certain officers and employees. 
Upon examination it was found that a blanket bond is carried, 
providing protection in the amount of $10,000 each for the employ- 
ees of the Convention, the Woman's Missionary Union, and the 
Baptist Book Store who handle any monies, with a coverage of 
$15,000 extra for the treasurer of the Convention, making a total 
of $25,000 for that officer. 

R. L. McMillan, Secretary, 

» 

Trustees of the Baptist State 

Convention of North Carolina. 

54. In the absence of George W. Paschal, Wake Forest, Chairman, 
the Recording Secretary, Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, presented 
the report of the North Carolina Baptist Historical Commission 
and upon his motion the report was approved. (See section 122, 
page 161). 

55. Under a special order the remaining officers of the Conven- 
tion were at this time elected. 

Statistical Secretary, Leonard L. Morgan, Raleigh, was reelected 
upon the motion of J. C. Canipe, Hendersonville. 

The General Secretary and Treasurer, M. A. Huggins, was re- 
elected upon the motion of Waldo Early, Fayetteville. 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh, P. H. Wilson, Raleigh, and F. H. Brooks, 
Smithfield, were reelected Trustees of the Convention upon the 
motion of Charles B. Deane, Rockingham. 

Reports from several Committees were received at this time. 

56. The Committee on Place and Preacher reported through 
the Chairman, R. E. Hardaway, Greenville, that the 1948 Conven- 
tion would meet with the First Baptist Church of Charlotte and 
that E. V. Hudson, Cramerton, was being asked to preach the ser- 
mon with C. C. Holland, Statesville, as alternate. This report was 
approved upon the motion of the Chairman of the Committee. 

57. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh, Chairman of the Committee on 
Publicity, presented the report and upon his motion, approved as 
follows : 



70 Baptist State Convention 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

The Committee on Publicity wishes to express appreciation to 
various persons and agencies for help and courtesies extended 
during the sessions of this Convention. 

First of all we wish to thank Pastor Ralph A. Herring and the 
staff of the First Church of Winston-Salem for assistance rendered 
by way of providing equipment and an office for our publicity 
work. 

Fon H. Scofield, Jr., Secretary of Visual Education, Radio and 
Publicity, with his assistants, Mrs. Scofield and Mrs. Gerald Bridges, 
have had charge of publicity during these sessions of this Con- 
vention, and Mr. Scofield has charge of Convention publicity all 
the year round. We wish to commend him for the excellent work 
which he is doing, and only wish he had more time to give to this 
important task. 

F. O. Carver of Radio Station WSJS, Winston-Salem, has been 
broadcasting news about the Convention five times per day, and 
for this we are most grateful. 

The committee is grateful also to the Winston-Salem papers, The 
Journal and The Sentinel, for their cooperation and for the generous 
space which they have given to the work of the Convention. Both 
the Associated Press and the United Press have cooperated with 
us, and helped greatly in sending out news. Among those who have 
been on the floor of the Convention, reporting our activities have 
been: 

Scott Summers of The Winston-Salem Journal. 

Colvin Leonard of the Greensboro Daily News. 

Miss Annie Lee Singletary of the Winston-Salem Sentinel. 

Miss Jane Hall of the Raleigh News and Observer. 

Harold Hayes of the Wake Forest College Old Gold and Black. 

The following photographers helped greatly in getting pictures 
for the papers: 

Frank Jones and Carl Weigold of theWinston-Salem Journal. 

Billy Roy and Miss Jean Cunningham of the Winston-Salem 
Sentinel. 

To all these and many others who have rendered service along 
these lines, we express appreciation. 

We rejoice in the fact that we now have a director of publicity 
who is working at this important matter of public relations through- 
out the year. We commend heartily the work of Mr. Scofield along 
these lines; and urge that our pastors and other leaders give to him 
their sympathy and help in any 'way possible so that news about 
our work and the basic message and principles of Baptists may 
be set forth more cleraly and understood better by the general 
public. This will not only help our cause but is a legitimate public 
service which we owe to the people of our day and generation. 



of North Carolina 71 

58. In keeping with a previous order of the Convention W. Perry 
Crouch, Asheville, presented General Secretary M. A. Huggins, 
Raleigh, on behalf of the Convention, certain gifts, as tokens of 
appreciation for his many years of service to North Carolina Bap- 
tists. Secretary Huggins responded, expressing for himself and 
Mrs. Huggins, who shared in so much of his activity, their feelings 
of deep gratitude. 

59. President Warren requested Vice President Robert L. Hum- 
ber, Greenville, to preside and the work of the American Bible 
Society was next considered. The discussion was led by Baine 
Harris, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, representing the Society. 

Attention is directed to Section 67, Page 73 concerning a reso- 
lution pledging support of the Convention to the American Bible 
Society. 

60. Under the guidance of Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, 
North Carolina Member of Foreign Mission Board, the next hour 
was devoted to Foreign Missions. Following the introduction of 
the Missionaries present, Bela Udvarnoki, Budapest, Hungary, ad- 
dressed the Convention. At the conclusion of this address the Con- 
vention approved a motion by Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson, that an 
offering be taken for the purchase of motorbikes to be used by 
ministers serving in the Budapest area. This offering was taken 
and amounted to $616.73. 

61. The Wingate College Junior Glee Club sang, "Lead Me Lord." 

62. A report was received from the Recording Secretary that 
the final enrollment figures showed that 1,336 messengers had en- 
rolled and 315 visitors. 

63. R. G. Lee, Memphis, Tennessee, brought the closing address 
using as his subject, "Christ Above All," and, following his prayer 
the session adjourned. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

64. At 9:30 the closing session convened and the audience sang 
"Draw Me Nearer" with Raymond C. Lanier, Rocky Mount, bring- 
ing the devotion. 

65. President Warren introduced William J. Conrad, Jr., Winston- 
Salem, President of the Board of Trustees of the Baptist Hospital 
who called attention to the hospital report appearing at section 120, 
page 156, and upon his motion, it was adopted following a dis- 
cussion of the report led by the following: 

Miss Pauline Watts, Morganton, Senior Student Nurse and Presi- 
dent of the Nurses School, whose subject was "The Baptist Hospital 
School of Nursing." 

Clarence Clark of Tennessee, Third Year Medical Student pre- 
paring for medical foreign mission service, discussed the subject 
"Bowman-Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest." 



72 Baptist State Convention 

He was followed by Everett Bernard of Tennessee, a graduate 
of the Southern Baptist Theologilcal Seminary and now taking 
advanced clinical training in the hospital, who discussed the "De- 
partment of Religion at the Baptist Hospital." 

George T. Harrell, Jr., Professor of Internal Medicine at the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine brought the closing message 
using the subject "The Future of the Baptist Hospital and the 
Bowman-Gray School of Medicine." 

66. Upon the reading of the Report of the Committee to Report 
on the General Board's Report, it was approved upon motion by 
William Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO REPORT ON THE GENERAL 
BOARD'S REPORT 

Your Committee, represented by 19 of the 23 members, met and 
gave full consideration to the splendid Report of the General Board. 
The committee had the able assistance of our genial Secretary of 
the Mission Board, M. A. Huggins, who furnished additional in- 
sight into the matters contained in the Report. 

Approval was given the Report in full and the 13 Recommenda- 
tions were considered item by item and endorsed with two simple 
clarifications in item 1 and 5. Recommendations are listed on pages 
70, 71, and 72 of the advanced Report. The clarifications suggested 
in 1 and 5 are as folows: 

1. That the division of Undesignated Cooperative Program funds 
as between State Convention Objects and Southern Convention 
Objects be on a 50-50 basis, divided thus: 

Southwide Convention Objects 50 per cent 

State Convention Objects 50 % divided thus: 

Christian Education (Colleges) 30 per cent 

State Missions r .....13 per cent 

Hospital 7 per cent 

Total. 100 per cent 

5. The paragraph to close with the figures 1948, thus deleting 
the rest of the sentence. 

Your committee wishes to give hearty endorsement to the actions 
of the General Board since the meeting of the Convention a year 
ago, and would call especial attention to items 1 and 2 in the Re- 
port in the form of Recommendations on page 15. (See Section 124, 
page 163). 

Members of the committee present were: Zeno Wall, Shelby, 
W. H. Williams, Charlotte, J. V. Case, Rose Hill, O. D. Moore Lincoln- 
ton, Edwin F. Perry, Rockingham, Mrs. Egbert Davis, Winston- 
Salem, Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, Roxboro, Wyman Wood, Hickory, Julian 
S. Hopkins, High Point, C. N. Royall, Durham, Alton Morris, Mur- 
phy, James Potter, Statesville, W. F. Woodall, Lenoir, Oscar Creech, 



of North Carolina 73 

Ahoskie, Grady Burgiss, Jacksonville, W. V. Tarlton, Concord, 
Howard Ford, Elkin, E. R. Stewart, Hamilton, S. N. Lamb, White- 
ville. 

67. A final report was received from the Resolutions Committee 
and the Chairman, Yancey C. Elliott, Sanford, presented the follow- 
ing resolutions: 

Upon his motion the Convention approved the second and last 
reading of the Resolution which appears in full at Section 12, 
Page 35, which would authorize the General Board and the Trustees 
of the Convention to purchase the real estate located at 304 North 
Tryon Street, Charlotte. 

A resolution was next approved upon motion by Chairman Elliott 
in support of the American Bible Society. This resolution reads 
as follows: 

Whereas, this convention recognizes that the American Bible 
Society renders an essential service to all forms of mission work 
throughout the world by aiding in Bible translation, publishing 
the Scriptures without note or comment, and distributing them 
without profit and usually below cost, and 

Whereas, in addition to its regular work the Society is also sup- 
plying without charge, millions of volumes of the Word of God 
for needy people who have been cut off from the Scriptures because 
of war conditions, 

Therefore be it Resolved, First, that we earnestly request our 
churches and our people to make contributions to the work of the 
American Bible Society, all such contributions to be sent through 
the regular channels to the Baptist State headquarters office, desig- 
nated for the American Bible Society. 

Second, that we approve a special offering for this work to be 
promoted through the office of the General Secretary, and to be 
taken on a day suggested by him, or at such other time as may be 
more appropriate for the local churches. 

In closing, the Committee on Resolutions requested and upon 
motion by Chairman Elliott, the following general resolution was 
approved : 

That this Convention express its gratitude to those who have 
made this session possible; to our host church, to the Rev. Ralph A. 
Herring, our host pastor; to the pastors of the local churches; to 
those who have acted as ushers, registrars, pages; to the janitors, 
and all others who have contributed to the provision of a meeting 
place; to the newspapers for the adequate space they have given 
to reporting the proceedings; to the hotels and to the many people 
of the city who have opened their homes for the entertainment of 
the messengers; to the police department and other public officials 
of the city. 

We also express appreciation to Mr. Rommie Pierce, the Music 
Director, and to all those who have had a special part in the music 
for the Convention. 



74 Baptist State Convention 

We would further express appreciation to the radio stations. 

68. T. L. Gardner, Reidsville, offered and the Convention adopted 
the following motion in support of national legislation to prevent 
the advertising of alcoholic beverages; to wit, BE IT RESOLVED 
that in keeping with the report on Social Service and Civic Right- 
eousness, Section 19, Page 37, Advanced Report, that we instruct 
the General Secretary of the Convention to send in the name of the 
Convention to each of our Senators and to each Congressman a 
written communication urging their undivided support toward the 
passage of the Capper or Senate Bill No. 265, the same being a bill 
to prohibit the advertising of alcoholic beverages. 

69. Chairman Richard K. Redwine, Hickory, brought the report 
of the Committee to nominate Members of the General Board, 
Trustees and Directors of Institutions and Agencies of the Con- 
vention and upon his motion the report was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE MEMBERS OF 

GENERAL BOARD, TRUSTEES AND DIRECTORS OF 

INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES OF THE BAPTIST 

STATE CONVENTION OF N. C. 

Members of General Board 

Terms to Expire 1950: H. Fletcher Lambert, Leaksville; W. B. 
Carr, Mooresvile. 

Terms to Expire 1951: Elbert F. Hardin, Morganton; Charles P. 
Burchette, Jr., Bladenboro; George Watkins, Durham; Isaac Terrell, 
Oxford; M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion; John A. Bivens, Wingate; J. 
Alton Morris, Murphy; Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro; F. Orion 
Mixon, Raleigh; Avery M. Church, Winston-Salem; Chas. F. Leek, 
Thomasville; Yates Arledge, Raleigh. 

Directors of Baptist Foundation 

Terms to Expire 1952: T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; C. E. Hamilton, 
Winston-Salem; W. C. Bandy, Lincolnton. 

Trustees of the Baptist Hospital 

Term to Expire 1948: W. J. Stephenson, Wilmington. 

Term to Expire 1950: T. W. Fryer, New Bern. 

Terms to Expire 1951: Homer Andrews, Burlington; J. G. Raby, 
Tarboro; Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; J. Roy Clifford, Lexington; D. R. 
Perry, Durham; E. B. Denny, Raleigh. 

Trustees of the Baptist Orphanage of N. C. 

Terms to Expire 1951: Miss Addie Mae Cook, Murphy; Mrs. Bess 
D. Scott, Charlotte; Mrs. L. C. Holloway, Elkin; Edwin Lanier, 
Chapel Hill; John M. Elliott, Edenton. 



of North Carolina 75 

Directors of Biblical Recorder 

Terms to Expire 1949: Lowell F. Sodeman, Clinton, succeeding 
John N. Evans, Jr., left the state. 

Terms to Expire 1951: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest; J. M. Hayes, 
Winston-Salem; L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia. 

Trustees of Campbell College 

Terms to Expire 1951: John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; J. H. High- 
smith, Raleigh; B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; Harry Carter, Greens- 
boro; Percy H. Wilson, Raleigh. 

Trustees of Gardner-Webb College 

Term to Expire 1950: Mrs. O. Max Gardner, Shelby, succeeding 
O. Max Gardner, deceased. 

Terms to Expire 1951: Claude Henson, Belmont; J. Gj Vann, Ra- 
leigh; Horace Hammett, Durham; Ed Harrell, Newton; S. L. Lamm, 
Bryson City; Fred Caldwell, Maiden; James Potter, Statesville. 

Trustees of Mars Hill College 

Terms to Expire 1951: R. O. Huffman, Morganton; Mrs. C. M. Pal- 
mer, Albemarle; A. W. Whitehurst, Marshall; J. E. Gibson, High 
Point; C. G. Mumford, Raleigh; Mrs. George Pennell, Asheville. 

Trustees of Meredith College 

Term to Expire 1950: Robert L. Humber, Greenville, succeeding 
Charles J. Shields, deceased. 

Terms to Expire 1951: Rufus Hunter, Raleigh; J. M. Kesler, Wins- 
ton-Salem; Mrs. Cooper E. Taylor, Charlotte; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; 
Howard J. Ford, Elkin; H. Pat Taylor, Wadesboro. 

Trustees of Wake Forest College 

Term to Expire 1950: S. A. Burts, Gastonia, succeeding B. W. 
Parham, deceased. 

Terms to Expire 1951: L. R. Varser, Lumberton; J. M. Broughton, 
Raleigh; E. C. Shoe, Taylorsville; J. J. Tarlton, Rutherfordton; 
Charles H. Jenkins, Aulander; John H. Vernon, Burlington; Peyton 
Ivey, Murphy; W. D. Poe, Oxford; O. J. Sikes, Albemarle. 

Council on Christian Education 

Terms to Expire 1951: Winfield Blackwell, Winston-Salem; Lloyd 
Griffin, Raleigh. 

Trustees Chowan College 

Terms Expiring 1948: M. W. Grissom, Shiloh; Mrs. Grady Bridges, 
Conway. 

Term Expiring 1949: W. T. Love, Elizabeth City. 
Term Expiring 1950: Hugh Lee, Ahoskie. 



76 Baptist State Convention 

Terms Expiring 1951: C. W. Duling, Hertford; R. N. Carroll, Eden- 
ton G. M. Singletary, Elizabeth City; G. B. Story, Murfreesboro; 
Mrs. T. J. Benthall, Murfreesboro; H. D. Raynor, Powellsville. 

70. President Warren recognized George D. Heaton, Charlotte, 
who called attention to the incorrect reporting of a news item ap- 
pearing in a Raleigh newspaper with reference to the Report of 
the Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness. It was 
pointed out that the unfavorable reaction to the news story by 
certain labor groups in that City had been clarified following the 
speaker's discussion of the report in detail. 

71. The President interrupted the program to announce that a 
few minutes earlier Brother P. A. Underwood, Missionary to the 
Indians at Pembroke had suddenly died in the church building. 
A moment of silent prayer was offered and the Secretary of the 
Convention was requested to convey to Mrs. Underwood feelings 
of sincere sympathy in the passing of this beloved servant. 

President Warren requested Vice President Hoyt Blackwell to 
preside. 

72. Louis S. Gaines, North Carolina Member of Relief and An- 
nuity Board presented Robert S. Jones, Dallas, Texas, official of 
the Relief and Annuity Board, who addressed the Convention. 

73. An address was given at this hour by R. G. Van Royen, 
Secretary of Visual Education, Home Mission Board, Atlanta, 
Georgia, who was introduced by J. Roy Clifford, Lexington, North 
Carolina, Member of Home Mission Board. 

74. Attention was directed to the first annual meeting of the 
Baptist Brotherhood of North Carolina which was held in the 
Centennary Methodist Church of Winston-Salem on the night pre- 
ceding the opening of the Convention. Horace Easom, Shelby, in 
behalf of the newly elected officers of the Brotherhood requested 
and the following report of this Brotherhood meeting was ordered 
inserted in the Convention proceedings as follows: 

At the business session the folowing officers were elected for the 
year: 

President — Don C. Young, Asheville, N. C. 

Vice President — Thomas P. Pruitt, Hickory, N. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer — C. R. Browning, Asheville, N. C. 

It was reported at the meeting that the General Board of the 
State Convention had selected Horace Easom of Shelby, North 
Carolina, as Executive Secretary of the Brotherhood, his active 
duties however not to commence until he had completed his work 
directing the Convention's program for Wake Forest College. Mr. 
Easom was present at the meeting and made a short talk in which 
he stated that his work in regard to Wake Forest College would 
soon be completed and he was then ready to begin his active duties 
in the Brotherhood work. 



of North Carolina 77 

A large crowd of men were present representing fifteen of the 
North Carolina Associations. The main address of the meeting 
was delivered by I. G. Greer, Superintendent of the Baptist Orphan- 
ages of North Carolina. He spoke on the subject "Interpreters of 
the Christian Religion." His message was a very inspiring one and 
was appropriately arranged for the occasion. 

Upon the suggestion of Mr. Easom the Brotherhood voted to 
meet during 1948 at some appropriate assembly ground on the 
sea shore, and another meeting at Fruitland in the mountains. The 
officers of the Brotherhood in conjunction with General Secretary 
M. A. Huggins were requested to arrange these meetings. 

The Brotherhood voted that the next annual meeting should be 
called and arranged for by the officers of the Brotherhood. 

75. It was agreed upon motion by Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, 
that the Recording Secretary and the General Secretary be author- 
ized to perfect the proceedings of the Convention. 

76. W. K. McGee, Winston-Salem, Chairman of the Committee 
on Memorials, brought the memorial message. 

Song: "There is A Land That Is Fairer Than Day." 

77. A special musical number, "Now Let Every Tongue Adore 
Thee," was presented by the Campbell College Chorus. 

78. President Warren, having resumed the Chair, introduced 
the following pages sponsored by the State Woman's Missionary 
Union in view of their excellence in Royal Ambassador work. 

Blair Little, Mills Home, Thomasville 
Charles McManus, Sanford 
Louie Lee Patseavouras, Rocky Mount 
Bobby Barnette, Hickory 

79. As the Convention approached a close, President Warren in 
well chosen words voiced his gratitude and sincere appreciation 
for having been given the opportunity to serve the Convention 
during the past two years. He called to the platform the newly 
elected President, J. W. Suttle, Shelby, and presented to him the 
gavel of the Convention. 

80. A fitting climax to the One-Hundred Seventeenth Annual Ses- 
sion^ of the Convention which had followed the theme, "By My 
Spirit," was the address of W. Marshall Craig, Dallas, Texas, who 
spoke on the subject, "Powerful Witnesses." 

81. At the President's request General Secretary M. A. Huggins 
came forward and offered the closing prayer and the Convention 
adjourned. 

Casper C. Warren, President, 

Charles B. Deane, Recording Secretary. 



78 Baptist State Convention 



tit Home #oer£ 



BENNETT, S. C Glen Alpine 

BERNHEIM, JACOB Raleigh 

BOOKOUT, R. A Grover 

BRINSON, H. F Currie 

DALTON, B. G Black Mountain 

DAVIS, B. M Asheville 

DOWELL, CLARENCE L Wake Forest 

EDWARDS, WILBUR L Lumberton 

GOUGH, W. H Pinnacle 

GREEN, C. W Marion 

HAMILTON, REV Suit 

HAMLET, PETER Morganton 

HELMS, D. F Monroe 

HORNE, C. B Roseboro 

KING, WILLIAM. Asheboro 

MARLEY, H. C Old Fort 

NANNEY, B. T Brevard 

NED, SIGLEY Cherokee 

PRIVETTE, J. E. Union Grove 

PRUETT, L. R Charlotte 

PRUITT, W. M Asheville 

PUTNAM, D. F Shelby 

ROBERTS, EZRA Rutherfordton 

SASSER, T. M Albemarle 

SMITH, HUGHIE St. Pauls 

SMITH, M. L Asheville 

SNOW, J. A Stanley 

SORRELLS, A. P Forest City 

SPALDING, J. H Murfreesboro 

TOWNSEND, CARL M Raleigh 

UNDERWOOD, P. A Pembroke 

WEST, W. F Roxboro 

YOUNG, CHARLES, SR Lexington 



Note : We call attention to the fact that this list is made up 
from reports received from the Associational clerks, to which 
we add any we may know about. We make this explanation 
becaues we realize that there are perhaps many who have not 
been included in the list. 



Piacj,>iam 



NORTH CAROLINA PASTORS' CONFERENCE 

First Baptist Church 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

NOVEMBER 10, 1947 



W. R. Grigg, Winston-Salem, Presiding 
Mark Osborne, Jr., Cullowhee,* Chorister 



MONDAY AFTERNOON 
Theme: The Pastor and World Needs 

2:30 — Praise and Worship Paul Reese, Statesville 

2 : 45 — Announcements 

2:50— Symposium: CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

1. What our Baptist Schools Have a Right to 

Expect of the Pastors Claude Gaddy, Raleigh 

2. What the Pastors Have a Right to Expect 

of Our Baptist Schools C. C. Warren, Charlotte 

3:50 — Announcements, Business, and Election of Officers 

4:05 — Special Music 

4:15 — The Pastor in the Midst of America's Turmoil 

Edwin Perry, Rockingham 
Adjourn 

MONDAY EVENING 
7:30 — Praise and Worship J. R. Everett, Robersonville 

7:45— "The Baptist Pastor Looks At the World" 

Perry Crouch, Asheville 

8:15 — Special Music 

8:25 — Inspirational Address Ralph Herring, Winston-Salem 

Adjourn 

W. R. Grigg, President 

J. Louis Price, Vice president 

Nane Starnes, Secretary 



80 Baptist State Convention 



LIST OF MESSENGERS BY ASSOCIATIONS 

ALEXANDER (10) — A. B. Bumgarner, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Echerd, Miss 
Lucy Echerd, Taylorsville; Q. L. Fry, Hickory; Rom L. Moose, Rev. and Mrs. 

E. C. Shoe, G. C. Teague, Harvey White, Taylorsville. 

ALLEGHANY (7) — W. F. Doughton, Laurel Springs; Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Fender, 
Whitehead: Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Joines, Sparta; Kenneth Snyder, Boiling Springs; 

F. G. Walker, Sparta. 

ASHE (1) — Virginia Dare Teague, West Jefferson. 

ATLANTIC (16) — John H. Bunn, Morehead City; E. H. Cannady, Richlands; 
Rev. and Mrs. W. M. Cassell, New Bern; L. C. Chandler, Davis; Mr. and Mrs. 
M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort; Thomas W. Fryer, Lillian Humphrey, New Bern; 
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Koonce, Richlands; Albert S. Lamm, Pollocksville; D. H. 
Lowder, Maysville; Mrs. Julia Marshburn, Roy Marshburn, Richlands; W. D. 
Williamson, Swansboro. 

AVERY (1) — J. W. Costner, Newland. 

BEULAH (15) — James E. Baker, Timberlake; W. T. Baucom, Yanceyville; J. N. 
Bowman, J. Boyce Brooks, Roxboro; Louie V. Coggins, Semora; Joe B. Currin, 
Jean Davis, Roxboro; Mrs. Ida M. Dodson, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest O. Foster, 
Yanceyville; J. F. Funderburk, Ella Sue Gravitte, H. R. Starling, Roxboro; P. F. 
Sutton, Yanceyville; Mrs. R. L. Wilburn, Roxboro. 

BLADEN (4) — Rev. and Mrs. Chas. P. Burchette, Jr.. Bladenboro; Rev. and 
Mrs. A. D. Frazier, Elizabethtown. 

BLUE RIDGE (11) — R. I. Corbett, Marion; C. C. Cross, East Marion; H. H. 
Justice, M. O. Owens, Jr.. C. C. Parker, Frank Robinson. Marion; R. L. Smith, 
Glenwood; Paul C. Stokes, Marion; Rev. and Mrs. H. E. Walden, Jr., Old Fort; 
Roy Webb, Nebo. 

BRIER CREEK (2) — C. B. Hendren, T. J. McNeil, Roaring River. 

BRUNSWICK (2) — H. M. Baker, South Port; Geo. W. H. White, Wilmington. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN (9) — Rev. and Mrs. W. N. Brookshire, Wilkesboro; D. E. 
Elledge, North Wilkesboro; J. F. Jordan, Wilkesboro; S. Madge Lewis, North 
Wilkesboro; T. E. Story, Wilkesboro; John L. Wells, Rev. and Mrs. John T. 
Wayland, N. Wilkesboro. 

BUNCOMBE (37) — Mrs. E. E. Abernethy, Asheville; Robert W. Abrams, West 
Asheville; W. B. Archer, Jack R. Bagwell, H. W. Baucom, C. R. Browning, 
W. T. Connor, J. A. Cox. Rev. and Mrs. W. Perry Crouch, Mr. and Mrs. John K. 
Durst, Carroll E. Fowler, Asheville; Guy B. Funderburk, Oteen; H. M. Hocutt, 
Asheville; Wilbur A. Huneycutt, Black Mountain: Rev. and Mrs. Charles Jollay. 
Swarmanoa; Rev. and Mrs. Neils H. Larsen, Asheville; Mrs. W. W. Lawhon, 
Ridgecrest; J. L. Lawrence, Asheville; Paul Lovingood, Fairview; Marguerite 
McKenzie, Ridgecrest; Carl G. Mauney, Enka; Perry Morgan, Ridgecrest; 
Everette Murray, Candler; Howard B. Murray, J. C. Pipes, Asheville; John H. 
Rice, Black Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. C. F. Rogers, I. H. Smith, Asheville; M. D. 
Smith, Candler; A. P. Sprinkle, Nane Starnes, Asheville; Tom E. Walters, Ridge- 
crest; Don C. Young, Asheville. 

BURNT SWAMP (5) — Harvie Brewington, L. W. Jacobs, P. A. Underwood, Daw- 
ley Maynor, T. M. Sweet, Pembroke. 

CABARRUS (41) — G. F. Agee, Concord; R. W. Bailes, Doris Jeane Beck, Douglas 
M. Branch, Daisy Chatham, Kannapolis; D. A. Clanton, Joe W. Connell, Con- 
cord; Rev. and Mrs. John P. Crouch, J. T. Davis, Kannapolis; T. B. Deese, Carl 
L. Devine, Concord; Carol Ann Edison, W. E. Entrekin, W. T. Furrn, Kannap- 
olis; R. F. Gardner, H. F. Goodwin, Concord; Mrs. C. D. Hartness, Kannapolis; 



of North Carolina 81 

C. E. Herrin, James F. Hinson, Concord; Mrs. Robert Howell. R. C. James. 
Wade H. James, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Martin, Mrs. Fred Martin, Kannapolis; 
Woodrow W. Millsapps, Concord; W. A. Johnson, Kannapolis; Rev. and Mrs. 
S. T. Morris, Concord; Eyra Dell Petrea, Kannapolis; S. W. Preslar, Concord; 
Mrs. A. F. Settlemyer, Kannapolis; W. B. Shropshire, T. C. Stallings. Concord; 
H. M. Stroup, Kannapolis; E. S. Summers, W. V. Tarlton, Fred L. Trull, Con- 
cord; J. S. Tyson, Kannapolis; Frances Winstead, Concord. 

CALDWELL (19) — Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Blankenship, Elizabeth Campbell, Lenoir; 
Frank Colburn, Rhodhiss; J. E. Crump, Hudson: Phillip D. Fletcher, Granite 
Falls; Thomas B, Flowe, Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. G. A. Hamby, Granite Falls; 
Mrs. Ward Johnson, Hudson; Rev. and Mrs. W. Walter Jones, W. R. Moss, 
Lenoir; Mrs. A. Lee Pearson, Fred C. Roberts, Granite Falls; M. W. Stallings, 
Whitnel; Mrs. M. W. Stallings, Lenoir; E. R. Teague, Hudson; W. F. Woodall, 
Lenoir. 

CAROLINA (10) — J. C. Canipe, B. G. Henry, Hendersonville; F. M. Huggins, 
Saluda; N. B. Phillips. E. V. Plemmons, Hendersonville; Fred R. Poplin, Flat 
Rock; L. G. Redding, Old Fort; C. E. Scarborough, Trycn; O. M. Seigler, J. N. 
Shuford, Hendersonville. 

CATAWBA RIVER (16) — C. M. Baird, Edward P. Bennett, Morganton; Fred 
Forester, Drexel; Paul Goodnight, Elbert F. Hardin, Morganton; J. B. Harris, 
Drexel; Rev. and Mrs. M. I. Harris, Valdese; Carl Hemphill, John D. McCready, 
R. F. Mayberry, L. E. Snipes, Morganton; Mr. and Mrs. Mack M. Summey, 
Valdese; C. R. Upton, Morganton; R. H. Weaver, Valdese. 

CHEROKEE (2) — J. Jeter Johnson, Arch Miller, Cherokee. 

CHOWAN (18) — Harry F. Bean, Belcross; D. P. Brooks, J. R. Byerly, Elizabeth 
City; Rev. and Mrs. J. T. Byrum, Belhaven; W. Van Carroll, Elizabeth City; 
Frank B. Dinwiddie, Manteo; Charles W. Duling, Hertford; Rev. and Mrs. W. W. 
Finlator, Elizabeth City; W. C. Francis, Tyner; M. W. Grissom, Shiloh; Eliza- 
beth Hutchins, Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Love, G. M. Singletary, W. R. Stephens, 
Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City. 

COLUMBUS (12) — Rev. and Mrs. B. G. Bass, Fair Bluff; J. D. Bullard, Chad- 
bourn; H. H. Collins, Whiteville; Winfrey Davis, Tabor City; Rev. and Mrs. 
S. N. Lamb, B. H. Laughridge, Whiteville; Robert C. Melton, Rockingham; A. C. 
Prevatte, Chadbourn; T. A. Tyner, Whiteville; J. B. Wyche, Hallsboro. 

DAN VALLEY (10) — Mrs. R. T. Burton, Reidsville; Mrs. Fred T. Duke, Leaks- 
ville; James C. Gillespie, Reidsville; R. O. Bennett, Jr., Mayodan; Mrs. S. P. 
Gilley, Spray; J. Guy Hopkins, Draper; H. Fletcher Lambert, Catherine Man- 
gan, Leaksville; E. T. Parham, Madison; R. L. Seay, Leaksville; Richard Smith, 
Draper; Walter D. Turner, Reidsville. 

EASTERN (23) — Rev. and Mrs. Gilmer J. Beck, Warsaw; Dorothy Brown, King D. 
Brown, Clinton; Rev. and Mrs. A. L. Benton, Kerr; Rev. and Mrs. J. V. Case, 
Rose Hill; Mack Herring, H. J. Kepping. John W. Lambert, Mount Olive; R. F. 
Marshburn, Salemburg; Everette Peterson. Clinton; Thomas L. Rich, Jr., Gar- 
land; Mr. and Mrs. J. Seleron Royal, Lowell F. Sodeman, Clinton; Rev. and 
Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Warsaw; B. A. Summerlin, Mount Olive; Mrs. L. J 
Teachey, Rose Hill; E. C. Watson, Ingold; Mrs. W. S. Wells, Rose Hill. 

ELKIN (3) — Howard J. Ford, J. C. Gwaltney, Elkin; J. D. Wyatt, State Road. 

FLAT RIVER (9) — Rev. and Mrs. M. L. Bannister, Oxford; W. Shelley Caudle, 
Stovall; Mrs. J. C. Hicks, Henderson; Rev. and Mrs. Walter L. Jones, Wake 
Forest; Aaron C. Phipps, Rolesville; W. D. Poe, Oxford; W. Isaac Terrell, 
Oxford. 

FRENCH BROAD (3) — Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill; A. K. Cheek, Marshall; John 
R. Link, Mars Hill. 

GASTON (44) — Myrtle Abernethy, M. L. Barnes, V. Ward Barr, Gastonia; Mrs. 
L. B. Bass, Belmont; L. E. Bookout, J. D. Brewer, Paul T. Brock, C. E. Brooks, 
6 



82 Baptist State Convention 

Gastonia; E. J. Caldwell, North Belmont; L. S. Clark, Mount Holly; W. A. 
Costner. Gastonia: R. Love Dixon, East Gastonia; E. S. Elliott, Cherryville; 
Mrs. W. J. Francis, Belmont; W. B. Hairr, Gastonia; Dorothy Harris, Cherryville; 
Hal Harris, Ozella Harriss, High Shoals; W. Luther Hawkins, Cherryville; P. A. 
Hicks, Lincolnton; W. Arthur Hoffman, West Gastonia; E. V. Hudson, Cramer- 
ton; Mrs. Kelly Huss, Cherryville; A. V. Ledford, Gastonia; Mrs. L. C. McDowell, 
Cherryville; Rev. and Mrs. O. B. Reel, Mount Holly; Mr. and Mrs. Bruce B. 
Littleton. Gastonia; Walter N. Long, Belmont; W. G. Rinehardt, Gastonia; 
John A. Richardson, Jr., Mrs. J. A. Richardson, High Shoals; Z. W. Rotan, Gas- 
tonia; Rev. and Mrs. Edward Roustio. Belmont; W. G. Russell, Mount Holly; 
W. C. Sledge, Lowell; S. A. Stroup, Mount Holly; W. G. Stroup, Gastonia; 
J. Ned Taylor, Bessemer City; Charles A. Truett, Gastonia; D. C. Wesson, 
McAdenville. 

GREEN RIVER (10) — L. P. Barnette, Union Mills; Homer E. Bradey, Columbus; 
Oren Bradley, Rev. and Mrs. Irby B Jackson, Rutherfordton; James B. Jones, 
Forest City; LeRoy D. Leppard, Lewis A. Lynch, Rutherfordton; Helen O. 
Lancaster, J. D. Williams, Spindale. 

HAYWOOD (13)— Daphne Boone. L. G. Elliott, Waynesville; C. H. Greene, 
J. Howard Hall, A. J. Hutchins, Canton; M. L. Lewis, Hazelwood; Mr. and Mrs. 
J. R. Morgan, Waynesville; T. H. Parris, Clyde; Horace L. Smith, Edgar Steph- 
ens; M. C. Wyatt. Waynesville; Roy V. Young, Clyde. 

JOHNSTON (31) — Mrs. Paul C. Allen, Mrs. Skinner Barbour, Mrs. Kermit Bar- 
bour, Worth Braswell, Benson; James Cammack, Smithfield; N. A. Catlett, Clay- 
ton; C. E. Crawford. Selma; Mrs. B. B. Creech, Four Oaks; C. S. Creech, Kenly; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Creech, Zebulon; Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Davis, Four Oaks; Mrs. 
Pauline H. Dixon, Mrs. Alonzo Gregory, Benson; P. P. Hartsell, Middlesex; 
Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, Clayton; M. M. Johnson, Mrs. James G. Lane, Raleigh; 
Mrs. E. V. McLamb, Benson; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Overby, Smithfield; Mrs. 
M. A. Peacock, Benson; William H. Poole, Smithfield; Rev. and Mrs. Thurman 
Stone, Benson; W. W. Turner, Princeton; Rev. and Mrs. Hugh C. Upchurch, 
Selma; Eph Whisenhunt. Clayton, Adam J. Whitley, Jr., Smithfield. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN (28) — Rev. and Mrs. Smoot Baker, Grover; W. P. Bigger- 
saff, Jesse Blalock, Shelby; C. B. Bobbitt, Kings Mountain; Boyd Cannon, 
Shelby; R. B. Carpenter, Belwood; Rev. and Mrs. M. A. Conrad, C. C. Crow, 
Horace Easom, Shelby; Philip Elliott, Ben Fisher, Boiling Springs; T. W. 
Fogleman, Kings Mountain; O. S. Long, Lawndale; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling 
Springs; A. M. Kiser, Waco; Lewis E. Ludlum, Shelby; Stephen Morrisett, 
Boiling Springs; O. M. Mull, Shelby; L. C. Pinnix, Kings Mountain; H. A. Priv- 
ette. Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence Roberts, Ernest M. Smith, Mrs. John W. Suttle, 
Shelby; Lula Mae Teague, Kings Mountain; Zeno Wall, Shelby. 

LIBERTY (43) — S. A. Ailred, Linwood; Victor L. Andrews, Lexington; E. F. 
Baker, Winston-Salem; S. D. Baker, Thomasville; W. H. Beck, Rev. and Mrs. 
J. Roy Clifford, Lexington; Carey J. Davis. High Point; Mrs. Mary B. Davis, 
Thomasville; J. W. Dickens, D. W. Digh, Lexington; Sarah E. Elmore, J. D. 
Fraley, Dr. and Mrs. I. G. Greer, Mrs. R. G. Jennings, Thomasville; F. G. 
Johnson, Lexington; Paul S. Keyes, Thomasville; Mrs. James Laws, Rev. and 
Mrs. Chas. F. Leek, Thomasville; Dorothy Loftin. Lexington; W. H. Lomax, 
Linwood; Sallie L. McCracken, J. A. McMillan, Florence McWilliams, Thomas- 
ville, C. C. Matheny, Lexington; B. A. Mitchell. Kernersville; Mr. and Mrs. 
E. L. Morgan, H. C. Myers, Lexington; C. M. Oates, Thomasville; David Old- 
ham. High Point; Dr. and Mrs. Carter Morgan, Thomasville; E. C. Roach, 
Denton; N. C. Teague, C. C. Wall, Lexington; Rev. and Mrs. J. O. Walton, Mrs. 
J. L. Ward, Jr., Mrs. J. L. Wood. Thomasville; S. B. Wilson, Winston-Salem. 

LITTLE RIVER (23) — Mrs. C. D. Bain, Dunn; Leslie H. Campbell, Buie's Creek; 
Lillian Draughan, Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Hodges, Dunn; Charles B. Howard, Buie's 
Creek; Rev. and Mrs. Sam F. Hudson, Lillington; E. C. Keller, Dunn; T. T. 
Lanier, A. E. Lynch, Buie's Creek; Rev. and Mrs. Forest Maxwell, Erwin; Rev. 
and Mrs. R. E. Moore. Mamers; S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn; Mr. and Mrs. Owen 



of North Carolina 83 

Odum, Coats; Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Stephens. Lillington; G. Scott Turner, Chaly- 
beate Springs; T. H. Williams, Raleigh; Harry D. Wood. Jr., Angier. 

MACON (10) — Anne Carter, Thorn N. Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Dorris, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Hicks. Highlands; Charles E. Parker, H. H. Plemmons, C. W. 
Potts, G. B. Woodward, Franklin. 

MECKLENBURG (50) — E. E. Abernethy, Mrs. Thomas D. Allen, Homer O. 
Baker, Charlotte; W. C. Bearden, Paw Creek; Rev. and Mrs. T. H. Biles, David 
E. Bobbitt, Claude IT. Broach, Mrs. Buford Cramer, J. M. Crowe, Mr. and Mrs. 
P. F. Dawson, W. F. Dunkard, E. R. Echerd, Jr., Lucius R. Evans, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ben F. Favell, H. L. Ferguson, John C. Fletcher, Jr., Charlotte; J. D. Griffin, 
Midland; George D. Heaton, Fred B. Helms, V. T. Helms, Wm. Guy Helms, 
George L. Hocutt, Charlotte; Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Jones, Newell; L. M. Kanipe, 
George P. Lanier, Roy S. Liner, Luther Little, Raymond Long, J. M. Medlin, 
J. D. Moose, Charlotte; E. S. Morgan, Clinton; Hubert S. Mumford, Matthews; 
J. W. Parham, Huntersville; Robert E. Poerschke, Rev. and Mrs. C. W. Propst, 
Mrs. H. A. Ridenhour, Rev. and Mrs. A. G. Sargeant, Charlotte; J. P. Thomas, 
Huntersville; Preston S. Vann, Dr. and Mrs. C. C. Warren, Wm. Harrison Wil- 
liams, A. B. Wood, J. Clyde Yates. 

MITCHELL (2) — Joseph B. Folds, Roy D. Keller, Spruce Pine. 

MONTGOMERY (6) — Frederick A. Bruton, Mount Gilead; Rev. and Mrs. W. Ray 
Gosnell, West End; J. B. Greene, Chas. E. Stevens, Mount Gilead; Charles B. 
Trammel, Troy. 

MOUNT ZION (78) — Ernest W. Bailes, Rev. and Mrs. H. B. Anderson, Durham; 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Homer Andrews, Burlington; Wallace O. Andrews, Durham; 
Mrs. J. O. Bailey, Chapel Hill; Thomas A. Bland, Carrboro; H. S. Branch, 
Alamance; Leo T. Bridges, Durham; W V. Brown, Haw River; C. E. Byrd, 
Apex; Guy S. Cain, Graham; Mrs. Virginia Carden, Warren Carr, Durham; 
Mrs. O. S. Chandler, Burlington; Mrs. C. M. Cheek, Trela D. Collins, Durham; 
Guthrie Colvard, Burlington; Ben W. Cox, Swepsonville; Truett Cox, Durham; 
Wayne Curtiss, Burlington; Mr. and Mrs. George B. Outten, Chapel Hill; James 
M. Dunn, Burlington; John T. Edwards, Durham; Frank Fagan, Mrs. W. D. 
Thomas, Tom M. Freeman, Burlington; Alfred F. Gibson, Durham; Mrs. F. E. 
Gilliam, Burlington; C. Sylvester Green, S. L. Green, H. G. Hammett, Durham; 
Rev. and Mrs. C. H. Henderson, Saxapahaw; Rev. and Mrs. Garland Hendricks, 
Apex; J. C. Herrin, Chapel Hill; L. H. Hollingsworth, Mebane; J. Samuel John- 
son, Durham; Mrs. T. Neil Johnson, Chapel Hill; Troy E. Jones, Carrboro; John 
H. Knight, J. Judson, Lennon, W. L. Lynch, Thomas W. McKneely, Frank 
Marshall; Herbert P. Miller, B. E. Morris, Durham; Luther A. Nail, Burlington; 
S. C. Parrish, Sr., D. R. Perry, Durham; L. J. Phipps, Chapel Hill; Mr. and Mrs. 
H. W. Pickett, Durham; Mrs. J. R. Poindexter, Burlington; A. H. Ragan, New 
Hill; Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Ragan, Apex; Ronald E. Rice, Burlington; J. H. Rich, 
Chapel Hill; R. H. Rigsbee, Durham; Mrs. I. W. Rose, Chapel Hill; C. N. Royal, 
Durham; C. H. Stanfield, Burlington; W. E. Stanley, Durham; Miss Sallie Staun- 
ton, Burlington; Miss Bessie Strange, Mrs. O. G. Tillman, Z. B. Teel, Durham; 
John Vernon, Mrs. J. H. Vernon, Burlington; Mr. and Mrs. Basil M. Watkins, 
Mrs. George T. Watkins, Jr., Durham; Rev. and Mrs. J. H. Waugh. Jr., 
Burlington. 

NEUSE (9) — N. F. Arant, Rev. and Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins, Miss Dorothy 
Elliott, Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Reed, Kinston; Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Smith, Golds- 
boro; E. C. Wilkie, Kinston. 

NEW SOUTH RIVER (18) — C. A. Abernethy, F. M. Barrett, Feyetteville; Waldo 
D. Early, Roseboro; D. M. Clemmons, Marion B. Corbett, Rev. and Mrs. 
Louis S. Gaines, Walton B. Guthrie, Mrs. G. C. Hamrick, Fayetteville; F. C. 
Hurley, Clinton; C. R. Johnson, Kenneth M. Lindner, L. J. Rainey, Fred 
Reeves, Fayetteville; A. E. Teague, Manchester; Baxter M. Walker, Fayette- 
ville; Herman Warren, Dunn; Opheus Warren, Roseboro. 

PEE DEE (26) — George W. Burch, Wingate; J. Max Cook, Lilesville; Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles B. Deane, Rockingham; Cade Deaver, Laurinburg; Mr. and Mrs. 



84 Baptist State Convention 

John W. Gore, Rockingham; Bettie Horton, Wingate; Elbert N. Johnson, Wa- 
gram; Helen Jones, Hamlet; O. W. McManus, Gibson; Rev. and Mrs. J. C. 
Meigs, Polkton; Ernest W. Moore, Rockingham; Rev. and Mrs. Frank R. Moore, 
Ellerbe; Mrs. Blanche Palmer, Edwin F. Perry, R. D. Riggins, Rockingham; 

B. M. Smith, Ellerbe; F. C. Smith, Wagram; J. Marvin Smith, Rockingham; Dr. 
and Mrs. James B. Turner, Laurinburg; Lewis W. Williams, Wadesboro; J. B. 
Willis, Hamlet. 

PIEDMONT (73) — Rev. and Mrs. W. C. Adkinson, Greensboro; J. M. Allred, 
Pomona; A. Andrews, Rev. and Mrs. Neil J. Armstrong; Mrs. J. R. Baker, 
Fred L. Bell, Mrs. Virgie Bishop, S. K. Brazil, Greensboro; A. W. Brooks, 
Pleasant Garden; Mrs. D. H. Bryson, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. W. E. Coates, 
Reidsville; C. G. Coe, Greensboro; O. P. Dix, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. J. Ben 
Eller, Greensboro; C. M. Floyd, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. Forrest L. Fraser, 
Greensboro; Mrs. L. W. Glenn, High Point; J. L. Goodwin, B. L. Gupton, 
Greensboro; W. C. Guth, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. Ray W. Harrington, C. R. 
Hinson, Greensboro; Julian S. Hopkins, W. Wilbur Hutchins, High Point; D. A. 
Kearns, Mrs. H. W. Kennedy, Greensboro; Luther M. King, Elon College; Rev. 
and Mrs. R. Von King, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. J. E. Kirk, Reidsville; E. O. 
Lankford, Brown Summit; Mrs. Ezra Lashley, Greensboro; Miss Willa Gray 
Lewis, Rev. and Mrs. V. L. Mabry, High Point; Howard May, Greensboro; 
Hughey O. Miller, High Point; Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Murchison, Greensboro; 
Donald G. Myers, Reidsville; Mrs. S. J. O'Neal, Ward Ostrander, High Point; 
Frank L. Paschal, Greensboro; Miss Thelma Patrick, High Point; Mrs. R. H. 
Pleasants, Reidsville; Mrs. J. P. Pugh, Greensboro; Miss Katherine Roddick, 
Reidsville; Mrs. Mazie W. Redmond, Greensboro; S. L. Riddle, Greensboro; 
Woodrow W. Robbins, High Point; T. L. Sasser, Greensboro; C. M. Scott, High 
Point; Rev. and Mrs. R. Crowell Shearin, Greensboro; Mrs. D. H. Short, R. L. 
Smith, Rev. and Mrs. W. L. Smith, High Point; Robert L. Taylor, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. Clyde Turner, T. C. Williams, Jr., George E. Williamson, Wilson Wood- 
cock, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Young, Greensboro. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN (67) — R. E. Adams, C. P. Burchett, Beatrice L. Bushey, 
Winston-Salem; Paul Brunner, Rural Hall; R. L. Carlton, Rev. and Mrs. Avery 
M. Church, L. Vernon Connell, James E. Corn, Jr., Joseph A. Crews, E. L. 
Davis, Winston-Salem; W. W. Dodson, Walnut Cove; C. N. Essex, Clemmons; 
Robert C. Foster, Leaksville; Mr. and Mrs. James F. Gant, Winston-Salem; 
Clyde W. Glossom, Kernersville; Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Gordon, Pilot Mountain; 
Miss Katy Ruth Grayson, Miss May Green, W. R. Grigg, James M. Hayes, Dr. 
and Mrs. Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. J. M. Johnson, 
Walnut Cove, C. L. James, Mrs. J. W. James, E. G. Jordan, T. C. Keaton, 
Winston-Salem; Henry W. Lankford, Walnut Cove; Rev. and Mrs. H. O. Lan- 
ning, King; Clyde E. Luther, W. K. McGee, M. E. Manuel, Winston-Salem; 
Walter M. Matthews, Pilot Mountain; Santford Martin, Rev. and Mrs. W. H. 
Moore, W. E. Pettit, V. D. Phillips, Miss A. Lucille Proctor, Winston-Salem; 
E. H. Richardson, Walnut Cove; Ray E. Roberts, Mrs. J. A. Roddick, Winston- 
Salem; Mrs. Roy L. Seay, Leaksville; Mrs. O. E. Shouse. Mrs. D. A. Smith, 
M. E. Sliger, Mr. and Mrs. Maskey M. Smith, John A. Stallings, Winston-Salem; 
J. F. Stegall, Clemmons; C. V. Strickland, N. A. Thompson, Jr., Burley S. 
Turner, Winston-Salem; Dr. and Mrs. C. V. Tyner, Leaksville; Mrs. H. B. 
VanHoy, Walkertown; O. E. Ward, Hanes, Walter L. Warfford, L. B. Womble, 
Mrs. George C. Yarbrough, Richard K. Young, Winston-Salem. 

RALEIGH (88) — Miss Lattye E. Arnold, Raleigh; A. L. Aycock, Wake Forest, 

C. E. Baker, Wendell; O. C. Bradbury, Wake Forest; Dr. and Mrs. Earle L. 
Bradley, Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Bradley, Raleigh; S. W. Brewer, Wake Forest; T.W. 
Brewer, James A. Buie, G. W. Bullard, Charles W. Burts, Raleigh; Ross Cadle, 
Apex; Carlyle Campbell, L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh; J. G. Carroll, Elton C. Cocke, 
Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. John L. Coley, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Combs, Raleigh; 
Robert L. Costner, Knightdale; Wm. J. Crain, Cary; J. Allen Easley, Wake 
Forest; Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Mrs. G. H. Ferguson, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. John 
CJ. Garner, Rolesville; Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh; C. O. Greene, Cary; Owen F. 
Herring, Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. S. A. High, Garner; John D. Holmes, M. A. 
Huggins, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. A. W. Icard, Henderson; Miss Annie Ivey, 



of North Carolina 85 

Raleigh; C. J. Jackson, Wake Forest; Don Jackson., Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Jackson, 
Raleigh; R. R. Jackson, Wake Forest; Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Jordan, Raleigh; 
Thurman Kitchin, Wake Forest; Dennis M. Larkins, Roberts C. Lasater, E. L. 
Layfleld, Raleigh; Jesse McCarter, Winston-Salem; Charles B. McConnell, 
Franklinton; John H. McCrimmon, Zebulon; LeRoy Martin, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. D. Martin, W. Reid Martin. Miss Ruth Miller, Raleigh; Carlton T. Mitchell, 
Zebulon; Miss Martha Jane Mitchell, F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh; Henry A. Morgan, 
Wake Forest; L. J. Morriss, Mrs. Myra S. Motley, C. G. Mumford, Rev. and 
Mrs. L. J. Newton, Jr., Raleigh; C. H. Norris, Eugene Olive, Wake Forest; Rev. 
and Mrs. L. Bunn Olive, Miss Virginia D. Overman, Raleigh; W. M. Page, 
Fuquay Springs; Miss Celeste Porter, Miss Ruth Provence, Mrs. G. S. Pruden, 
James W. Ray, Raleigh; Mrs. Wiley Robertson, Jr., Knightdale; W. A. Sea- 
graves, Holly Springs; Rev. and Mrs. Ryburn T. Stancil, Apex; I. T. Stroud, 
Wake Forest; L. Bland Taylor, Raleigh; C. W. Teague, Wendell; C. A. Upchurch, 
Raleigh; Cecil Watson, Youngsville; Mrs. C. Y. Williams, Knightsdale; Wm. L. 
Wyatt, Raleigh. 

RANDOLPH (25) — John T. Biddle, Dan S. Brinkley, Asheboro; Mrs. Carl Brown, 
Franklin ville; Vance Edwards, Kannapolis; Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Elam, Frank- 
linville; Mrs. C. F. Fagg, Randleman; P. C. Gantt, Ramseur; C. E. Hampton, 
High Point; R. E. Heath, James E. Hill, C. W. Hilliard, Mrs. H. F. Hundley, 
Robert L. Hughes, Mrs. Harvey Lambeth, Asheboro; Charles J. McBride, 
High Point; Dr. and Mrs. H. K. Masteller, Asheboro; J. I. Memory, Randleman; 
G. F. Settlemyre, Central Falls; C. M. Strickland, Steeds; Mrs. Ed Thomas 
Mrs. R. H. Thompson, Asheboro; Marvin M. Turner, Archdale; Miss Katherine 
Ulmer, Asheboro 

ROANOKE (49) — Rev. and Mrs. J. Felix Arnold, Enfield; Miss Emily S. Austin, 
Tarboro; Rev. and Mrs. Clyde E. Baucom, C. W. Bazemore, Scotland Neck; 
E. D. Bergen, Stantonsburg; Rev. and Mrs. Norman L. Blythe, Rocky Mount; 
Edward G. Cole, Winterville; R. L. Collins, Sharpsburg; G. N. Cowan, Rocky 
Mount; George W. Davis, Farmville; C. Arthur Francis, Rev. and Mrs. W. F. 
Gentry, Nashville; Rev. and Mrs. J. R. Everett, Robersonville; Clarence E. 
Godwin, Rocky Mount; Rev. and Mrs. W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck; Rev. and 
Mrs. Worth C. Grant, Weldon; Mr. and Mrs. John F. Griffin, Rocky Mount; 
R. E. Hardaway, Greenville; W. B. Harrington, Williamston; Parks C. Harris, 
Red Oak; Harold L. Hawkins, Spring Hope; E. W. Holmes, Farmville; L. D. 
Holt, Bethel; Robert Lee Humber, Greenville; Philip Hutchinson, Rocky 
Mount; W. I. Johnson, Ayden; Robert Joyner, Farmville; J. W. Kincheloe, 
Rocky Mount; Mrs. Leland Kitchin, Scotland Neck; Dr. and Mrs. Ira D. S. 
Knight, Williamston; C. W. Kreamer, Halifax; Rev. and Mrs. Raymond C. 
Lanier, H. C. Lowder, Rocky Mount; Jack Neilson, Greenville; Paul B. Nickens, 
Plymouth; Louie Lee Patseavouras, Rocky Mount; J. L. Powers, Scotland 
Neck; Elliot R. Stewart, Hamilton; B. Marshall White-Hurst, Roanoke Rapids, 

ROBESON (19) — M. O. Alexander, Lake View, S. C; Mrs. F. M. Ammons, Red 
Springs; O. A. Anderson, Rowland; J. Glenn Blackburn, Lumberton; T. Paul 
Deaton, Parkton; J. M. Gibbs, Stedman; R. A. Hedgpeth, Lumberton; C. P. 
Herring, Fairmont; J. C. McQueen, Jr., J. Lloyd Mauney, Red Springs; Miss 
Doris Paul, St. Pauls; John Rankin, Lumberton; Rev. and Mrs. W. Earl Robin- 
son, St. Pauls; Rev. and Mrs. A. P. Stephens, George H. Wallace, Lumberton; 
J. D. Whisnant, Raeford; Mrs. C. L. Young, Red Springs. 

ROWAN (41) — Mrs. Joe F. Baker, Zeb D. Baker, China Grove; Clay R. Barnes, 
Spencer; W. W. Beam, Woodlief; Rev. and Mrs. R. O. Brinkley, China Grove; 
George B. Edwards, Spencer; F. P. Blankenship, Rockwell; Tom W. Bray, 
Faith; H. T. Davis, T. A. Dennis, China Grove; R. L. Deweese, R. A. Ellis, Mrs. 
Tom Goggin, Mrs. S. G. Hasty; Mrs. D. L. Hendrix, J. H. Hill, Salisbury; Mrs. 
R. W. Hutchins, Spencer; L. A. Huneycutt, R. N. Huneycutt, Rev. and Mrs, 
W. R. Kiser, Salisbury; W. A. Laudermilch, Spencer; Rev. and Mrs. E. L. 
Melton, Salisbury; C. R. Miller, Gold Hill; Vilas N. Minton, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. 
Myers, Mrs. C. Y. Owen, Salisbury; Grady Queen, Spencer; Rev. and Mrs. 
C. A. Rhyne, Bill Roberson, Mrs. L. A. Sheets, Salisbury; Mrs. and Mrs. L. H. 
Tatum, China Grove; W. H. Walton, Salisbury; Edgar H. Wilmer, Spencer; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Yarbrough, Salisbury. 



86 Baptist State Convention 

SANDY CREEK (33) — Mrs. Will Bland, Pittsboro: T. J. Brooks, Miss Ethel 
Brown, Sanford; Rev. and Mrs. K. E. Bryant, Pittsboro; E. W. Byerly, Bear 
Creek; Zeb A. Caudle, Aberdeen; Mrs. Colin Churchill; G. W. Davis, Steeds; 
Rev. and Mrs. L. M. Dixon, Cameron; Mrs. L. P. Dixon, Siler City; Yancey C. 
Elliott, Sanford; Robert A. Gardner, Jonesboro; Mrs. C. C. Gee, Siler City; 
George M. Graham, Goldston; J. Parks Hackney, Siler City; Victor R. John- 
son, Pittsboro; E. H. Jordan. Siler City; J. C. Kidd, Bennett; J. Lamar Jackson, 
Southern Pines; Charles McManus, Roy A. Morris, Sanford; Mr. and Mrs. 
Talmage O. Moses, Aberdeen; Carl Lee Ousley, Mrs. R. F. Paschal, Mrs. 
Margaret Perry, Siler City; Henry Powell, Gerald C. Primm, D. B. Teague, 
Sanford; H. A. Teague, Siler City; Joseph F. Woodson, Aberdeen. 

SANDY RUN (11) — Rev. and Mrs. M. D. Blanton, J. R. Featherston, Forest City; 
W. F. McGinnis, Ellenboro; M. H. Ingle, Forest City; Tom S. Lawrence, Cliff- 
side; Rev. and Mrs. J. L. McCluney, Henrietta; Ben Lee Ray, Avondale; H. 
Hansel Stembridge. Jr., S. Guy Walker, Forest City. 

SOUTH FORK (38) — Bab Barnette, R. Knolan Benfield, Rev. and Mrs. Latt 
Beshears, Hickory; A. F. Blackburn, Lincolnton; R. F. Boatwright, Conover; 
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. DeHart, Hickory; Bertis Fair, Newton; Mr. and Mrs. J. H, 
Gilley, Maiden, Miss Elizabeth Granlee, Lincolnton; Edward T. Harrell, New- 
ton; Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Hatfield, Fritz D. Hemphill, R. A. High, Hickory; 
Talmage C. Johnson, Newton; W. C. Laney, Brookford; W. P. Lippard, Lincoln- 
ton; R. G. Mace, Long Island; O. D. Moore, Lincolnton, Rev. and Mrs. J. R. 
Puette, J. Louis Price, Hickory; W. W. Rimmer, Lincolnton; Clyde J. Reep, 
Maiden; H. L. Sides, Ernest Sisk, Lincolnton; Miss Cletus Speagle, Vale; Mrs. 
Henry Starnes, E. F. Sullivan, E. S. Teague, Hickory; A. R. Waters, Catawba; 
L. R. Williams, Maiden; Rev. and Mrs. R. L. Wilson, Wyman E. Wood, Hickory. 

SOUTH YADKIN (11) — J. W. Allen, Statesville; Mrs. C. F. Barnhardt, Mocks- 
ville; Rev. and Mrs. W. B. Carr, Mooresville; A. C. Cheshire, Mocksville; R. R. 
Cook, Statesville; Mr. and Mrs. Ed Christenbury, Mooresville; J. P. Davis, 
Mrs. W. H. Dodd, Mocksville; Z. Miller Freeman, Harmony; Mr. and Mrs. 
J. C. R. Hendon, Mooresville; T. M. Hendrix, Mocksville; Rev. and Mrs. C. C. 
Holland, Miss Esther W. Hollowell, Mrs. W. E. Johnson, Mrs. Weber Jordan, 
Miss Willa Marks, Statesville; Mrs. G. E. Merrell, Mocksville; S. P. Orders, 
Mooresville; James S. Potter, Paul M. Reese, Statesville; G. L. Royster, Coolee- 
mee; Mrs. Alpha Rummage, Mocksville; C. N. Spry, Statesville; Rev. and Mrs. 
A. T. Stoudenmire, Cleveland; Miss Annie Pearl Tatum, E. W. Turner, 
Mocksville. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN (6) — Miss Lysbeth Cox, North Wilkesboro; J. David Good- 
win, Hildebran; L. A. Miller, Connelly Springs; Geter R. Porch, Rhodhiss; H. A. 
Quick, Vale; S. M. Stroupe, Connelly Springs. 

STANLY (20) — O. H. Bolch, W. J. Bradley, Albemarle; C. V. Comer, Steeds; 
J. F. Crisco, Rev. and Mrs. L. W. Fields, Mrs. W. C. Flake, New London; Rev. 
and Mrs. Leo F. Hawkins, Norwood; Woodrow W. Hill, Albemarle; Fred H. 
Hopkins, Norwood; L. D. Munn, Badin; Mrs, Clyde Pickler, Mr. and Mrs. D. F. 
Pickler, D. Garrett Pickler, Z. T. Russell, New London: Mrs. J. A. Seymour, 
Vance Soloman, Alfred E. Staley, Albemarle. 

SURRY (10) — Mrs. W. A. Jackson, Mrs. W. M. Johnson, Rev. and Mrs. C. E. 
Otey, Mount Airy; Rev. and Mrs. J. E. Pearson, Dobson; Rev. and Mrs. R. K. 
Redwine, Mrs. A. V. West, W. E. Woodruff, Mount Airy. 

TAR RIVER (27) — J. Edward Allen, Warrenton; H. W. Anderson, Leon Frazer, 
Henderson; W. C. Blue, Bunn; R. E. Brickhouse, Warrenton; Rev. and Mrs. 
E. Norrleet Gardner, M. B. Garrett, Henderson; Billy M. Gordon. Youngsville; 
E. W. Greene, Henderson; Robert W. Greene. Warrenton; B. E. Honeycutt, 
Spring Hope; Crate Jones. Jr., Littleton; W. H. Kimball, Henderson; Rev. 
and Mrs. Julian H. King, Littleton; E. C. Morris, Henderson; M. A. Pegram, 
Zebulon; Lee Pridgen, Louisburg; Rev. and Mrs. R. Talmage Smith, Miss Dora 
Page Scarlette, Mrs. W. C. Stainback, J. R. Teague, Henderson; Aubrey S. 
Tomlinson, Louisburg; V. G. Vaughan, Henderson; Jack B. Wilder, Wake 
Forest. 



of North Carolina 87 

TENNESSEE RIVER (1) — S. L. Lamm, Bryson City. 

THREE FORKS (9) — W. G. Bond, H. R. Eggers, Boone; W. J. Farthing, Valle 
Crucis; Oscar J. Harris, Blowing Rock; H. K. Middleton, Sherwood; Miss 

. Marjorie Toole, Boone; Rev. and Mrs. Clarence O. Vance. Vilas; J. H. Winkler, 
Blowing Rock. 

TRANSYLVANIA (4) — Thomas Carter, Rosman; Floyd B. Clark, Brevard; S. B. 
McCall, Lake Toxaway; A. M. Paxton, Rosman. 

TUCKASEIGEE (6) — W. N. Cook, Webster; B. S. Hensley, Sylva; Rev. and Mrs. 
Mark R. Osborne, Jr., Mrs. Howard Painter, Cullowhee; C. M. Warren, Sylva. 

UNION (15) — L. P. Beck, Wingate; C. M. Boatwright, B. S. Broome, Monroe; Dina 
Dominguez,. Wingate; S. A. Hatley, J. Boyd Horton, Woody Lundy, Monroe; 
C. L. Pickler, Matthews; J. C. Ray, Monroe; Fred Sandusky, David Shelton, 
Miss Esma Shelton, Mr. and Mrs. Earl H. Underwood, Wingate; J. N. Watson, 
Marshville. 

WEST CHOWAN (25) — Rev. and Mrs. R. L. Councilman, Windsor; J. B. Dailey, 
Jackson; Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Huggins, Windsor; Fletcher Ford, Severn; T. N. 
Cooper, Rich Square, Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; P. H. Jameson, Woodland; 
Charles H. Jenkins, Aulander; J. L. Jones, Murfreesboro; John E. Lanier, 
Winton; John H. Lassiter, Woodland; C. G. Maddrey, Ahoskie; W. P. Milne, 
Aulander; C. G. Parker, Woodland; E. C. Parker, Potecasi; Joe F. Roach, Lewis- 
ton; Rev. and Mrs. E. J. Rogers, Rev. and Mrs. Jarvis Teague, Seaboard; Rev. 
and Mrs. J. U. Teague, Powellsville; P. T. Worrell, Colerain. 

WILMINGTON (25) — Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Batson, Mrs. C. E. Brisson, Wilming- 
ton; Mr. and Mrs. C. V. Brooks. Wallace; Rev. and Mrs. L. Grady Burgiss, 
Jacksonville; E. C. Chamblee, Wilmington; J. Bryan Dosher, Kelly; F. L. Kelly, 
T. H. King, Rev. and Mrs. G. Carl Lewis, Rev. and Mrs. Charles A. Maddry. 
Guy C. Moore, Miss Margaret Parks, E. W. Pate, Wilmington; William A. 
Poole, Burgaw; W. E. Pope, Holly Ridge; J. A. Powers, Wallace; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. J. Stephenson, Miss Evelyn Straughan, Wilmington; Ben B. Ussery, Caro- 
lina Beach. 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (9)— Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Chandler, Miss Addie 
Mae Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Peyton G. Ivie, J. Alton Morris, Murphy; Rev. and 
Mrs. T. Earl Ogg, Andrews; Miss Mildred Whitfield, Murphy. 

YADKIN (10) — Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Allgood, Mrs. Paul Price Davis, Yadkinville; 
Mrs. J. W. Garner, Hamptonville; Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Grigg, Mrs. N. L. Huds- 
peth, Yadkinville; John Ivan Kiser, Boonville; E. W. McMurray, M. F. Reavis, 
Yadkinville. 

YANCEY (2) — Rev. and Mrs. Ben J. Mclver, Burnsville. 
Total Messengers: 1,301. 

VISITORS (352)— Mrs. R. E. Adams, Winston-Salem; Mrs. M. A. Agner, Spencer; 
Mrs. H. F. Aitchison, Winston-Salem; J. T. Allen, Fayetteville; Mr. and Mrs. 
B. F. Anderson, Mocksville; Mrs. Martha Americk, Winston-Salem; Elbert E. 
Angel, Franklin; Mrs. Hackett Applewhite, Raleigh; Don C. Austin, Charlotte; 
Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh; Mrs. E. F. Baker, Winston-Salem; Ray Baker, 
Greensboro; Mrs. Edward Barnes, Stoneville: Mrs. Raymond Barnes, North 
Wilkesboro; Mrs. C. W. Bazemore, Scotland Neck; Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Bedding- 
field, Winston-Salem; Mrs. R. O. Bennett, Jr., Mayodan; Millard J. Berquist, 
Tampa, Florida; Mrs. John T. Biddle, Asheboro; Rev. and Mrs. Ray Billings, 
Dobson; Miss Louise L. Blake, Thomasville; Miss Gloria Blanton, Greenville; 
Mrs. W. G. Bond, Boone; Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Booe, Winston-Salem; Mrs. C. N. 
Bray, Siler City; Mrs. J. D. Brewer, Gastonia; Mrs. H. F. Brissenden, Winston- 
Salem; Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Britt, Raleigh; Mrs. Rena Britt, Clinton; L. R. Brock, 
Charlotte; J. Burley Brown, Winston-Salem; Miss Louella Brown, Morganton; 
Miss May Joe Brown, Richlands; Mrs. H. D. Browning, Monroe; Mrs. G. W. 
Brownlow, Jr., Winston-Salem; Miss Dorothy Bullard, Chadbourn; Miss Alma 
Bumgarner, Belmont; Mrs. R. L. Burgin, Winston-Salem; Samuel G. Burgiss, 



88 Baptist State Convention 

Jacksonville; W. H. Butler, Jr., Durham; J. W. Byers, Lexington; Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Byrd, Durham; Miss Iris Jean Byrd, Concord; R. D. Byrd, Albe- 
marle; Mrs. S. M. Byrd, Concord; Tommy Caldwell, Gastonia; S. A. Campbell, 
Roy T. Cann, C. C. Carpenter, Winston-Saiem; Mrs. L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh; 
Mrs. Thomas Carrigan, Taylorsville; Hardy A. Carroll, Guilford College; Mrs. 
Jesse Carter, Winston-Salem; Mrs. A. C. Chamberlain, North Wilkesboro; Mrs. 
M. T. Chamberlain, Yadkinville; Mrs. L. C. Chandler, Mrs. Butler Chapman, 
Taylorsville; Mrs. J. G. Chipman, North Wilkesboro; Mrs. E. L. Clark, Salis- 
bury; Mrs. R. U. Collette, Mocksville; Mrs. Paul W. Cooper, Warrenton; Mrs. 
R. I. Corbett, Marion; Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Covington, Rockingham; Mrs. Lee 
Crayton, Concord; Mrs. J. S. Crews, Winston-Salem; Roberto Cripps, Wades- 
boro; Mrs. Ed Crisco, High Point; Miss Bettye Crouch, Chapel Hill; Miss 
Elizabeth Crow; W. M. Dameron, Marion; Miss Velva Daughtry, Thomasville; 
Mrs. E. L. Davis, Winston-Salem; Henry Davis, Greensboro; Miss Juanita Davis, 
Boone; Mrs. J. T. Davis, Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. Norwood Davis, Albe- 
marle; Mrs. R. M. Davis, Tarboro; Mrs. R. T. Davis, Winston-Salem; Frank 
Morgan Dawkins, Kmston; Mrs. Jerome Day, Winston-Salem; Miss Mildred 
Deaver, Laurinburg; Mrs. O. P. Dix. High Point; Miss Darleen Dixon, Mrs. 
R. Love Dixon, East Gastonia; Fred T. Duke, Leaksville; Mr. and Mrs. John H. 
Dyer, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Vance Edwards, Kannapolis; Mrs. A. J. Essex, 
Winston-Salem; C. T. Evans, Lexington; Mrs. W. D. Farmer, Rocky Mount; 
Mrs. Kate Farrington. Gastonia; G. H. Ferguson. Raleigh; Miss Marjorie 
Ferrell, Mount Holly; Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Fox, Hickory; Mrs. T. J. Frazier, 
North Wilkesboro; Mrs. C. L. Fryer, Tarboro; Thomas J. Fulk, Harrellsville; 
Mrs. E. W. Fulton, Winston-Salem; Mrs. W. B. Fulton, Trinity; Catherine Furr, 
Concord; Mrs. J. B. Futrelle, Winston-Salem; Mr. and Mrs. Claude F. Gaddy, 
Raleigh; T. L. Gardner, Reidsville; T. B. Gaskins, Greensboro; Mrs. D. E. 
Gatewood, Winston-Salem; Mrs. H. F. Goodwin, Concord; Talmage Graham, 
Winston-Salem; Mrs. Forrest P. Grasty, Roxboro: Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Greer, 
Boone; George W. Griffin, Washington, D. C; Ernest Grigg, Ontario, Canada; 
Mrs. W. R. Grigg, Winston-Salem; Miss Mae Grimmer, Raleigh; Mrs. W. G. 
Grubb, Mrs. J. M. Gupton, Salisbury; Mrs. W. C. Guth, High Point; Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith Hagaman, Winston-Salem; Mrs. N. F. Hall, Stoneville; Mrs. B. L. 
Hames, Lexington; Miss Bettyie Hamilton, Thomasville: Miss Evelyn Hamp- 
ton, Charlotte; Mr. and Mrs. O. V. Hamrick, Shelby; Mrs. C. L. Hambins, 
Thomasville; Mrs. Elbert F. Hardin, Morganton; Lindsey E. Harrell, Edenton; 
W. D. Harrington, Wallace; A. P. Harris, Albemarle; Baine Harris, Richmond, 
Va.; J. B. Harris, Drexel; Mrs. Ray Harris, Spencer; Mrs. T. A. Hansel, Miss 
Winona Hauser, Mrs. James M. Hayes, Jr., Winston-Salem; Mrs. L. O. Hayes, 
Fremont; Rudolph M. Heavner, Valdese; Miss Mary Hedgecock, Thomasville; 
Mrs. R. F. Hedrick. Siler City; H. H. Henderson, Spencer; Miss Margaret Her- 
ring, Winston-Salem; Miss Viola Hester, Thomasville; Miss Katherine High, 
Mrs. Ralph High. Mrs. R. A. High, Hickory; Miss Lucy Highfill. Miss Susie 
Highfill. Winston-Salem: William C. Hill, Troutman; Mrs. Theo Hillard, Salis- 
bury; Miss Laura Mae Hilliard. Burnsville; Miss Naomi Hinson, Belmont; C. C. 
Honeycutt, Stanfield; E. J. Honeycutt, Albemarle; Mrs. M. A. Huggins, Raleigh; 
Calvin H. Hyler, Draper; Bill Jackson, Raleigh; Frank Jackson, Hendersonville; 
F. E. Johnson, Winston-Salem; Fred W. Johnson, Taylorsville; J. P. Johnson, 
Fayetteville; Mrs. Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro; Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Johnson, 
Kerr; W. O. Johnson. Taylorsville; Bill Jones, Reidsville; Mrs. G. E. Jones, 
Winston-Salem; R. M. Jordan, Maiden; Mrs. Joe R. Joyce, Price; Mrs. Wallace 
Joyce, Winston-Salem; C. E. Lelly, Winston-Salem; H. W. Kennedy, Greens- 
boro; Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Kesler. Winston-Salem; J. L. Kirk, Salisbury; Mrs. 
A. M. Kirkland. Durham; Mrs. G. E. Knowles. Wadesboro; Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley H. Knowlton, Winston-Salem; Miss Opal Kobles, Chadbourn; Mrs. T. R. 
Koontz, Erlanger; B. C. Lamb, Reidsville; C. F. Landreth, Greensboro; Mrs. 
J. E. Lanier, Winton; J. C. Lanning, Linwood; Ed Lenning, Gastonia; Miss 
Katherine Lewis, Mount Olive; Mrs. K. M. Lindner, Fayetteville; A. Smith 
Long. Conway, S. C; Mrs. Walter N. Long, Belmont; Marc H. Lovelace, Wake 
Forest; Jack Lowder, Salisbury; Walton Lowry, Pembroke; Mrs. Dan Lynch, 
Mr. and Mrs. Carey W. McCochern, Winston-Salem; Mrs. E. T. McDade, 
Lexington; Carl McKinney, Marion; Miss Frances McManus, Gibson; Mrs. 



of North Carolina 89 

J. C. McQueen, Jr.. Red Springs; Mrs. E. W. McMurray, Yadkinville; Mrs. S. A. 
Malloy, Yanceyville; Mrs. R. M. Mann, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. F. Martin, 
Wadesboro: Arthur K. Mason, Jr., Fayetteville; Mrs. B. C. Mason, Winston- 
Salem; Miss Helen Burt Mauney, Thomasville; Miss Hilda Mayo, Raleigh, Joe S. 
Meadows, Gastonia; Miss Pauline Medearis, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. H. Mid- 
kiff, Mount Airy; E. A. Miller, Morganton; Mrs. A. O. Moore, Scotland Neck; 
Mrs. L. J. Moore, St. Pauls; Paul Moore, Yadkinville; Quinn Morgan, Watha; 
James Wallace Morris, Concord; Miss Motsinger, Boonville; Mrs. A. H. Motz, 
Yanceyville; Mrs Donald Myers, Wadesboro; Mrs. John R. Myers, Winston- 
Salem; Miss Inez Naylor, Mocksville; Mrs. J. L. Norrell, Mrs. P. F. Osborne, 
Mrs. I. A. Oustin, Winston-Salem; Edgar Alan Pace, Horse Shoe; J. M. Page, 
Raleigh; H. E. Parker, Winston-Salem; Mrs. C. F. Pate, Tarboro; Miss Dorothy 
Patrick, Raleigh; Mrs. J. C. Pearce, Asheboro; Miss Pauline Perry, Winston- 
Salem; J. Kenneth Peters, Ridgeway, Va.; Mrs. R. E. Phillips, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. J. T. Philpott, Stoneville; Mrs. T. W. Pickett, Durham; Mrs. C. L. Pickler, 
Matthews; Rommie Pierce, Wingate; Miss Clara M. Pigg, Mrs. W. T. Poindexter, 
Mrs. A. E. Pope, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. B. Powell, Lexington; Mrs. Grady 
Queen, Spencer; Mrs. E. A. Randleman, Mount Airy; John H. Rappe, Char- 
lotte; Mrs. M. F. Reavis, Mrs. J. T. Reece, Yadkinville; A. C. Reid, Wake 
Forest; Mrs. E. E. Richards. Rocky Mount; Miss Lucile Rives, Kannapolis; W. C. 
Robenson, Ellerbe; Mrs. Will Rominger, Waughtown; M. L. Ross, Bristol, Tenn.; 
Mrs. J. W. Sanders, Four Oaks; G. T. Schulmerich, Lansdale, Pa.; Miss Johnnie 
Ruth Sears, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Gray Sheets, Mocksville; Mrs. H. W. Shel- 
ton, High Point; N. H. Shepherd, Greensboro; J. E. Shockley, Bruington, Va.; 
Mrs. J. N. Shockley, Thomasville; O. J. Sikes, Albemarle; Miss Margaret E. 
Sills, Salisbury; R. N. Simms, Jr., Raleigh; Mrs. A. G. Smith, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. B. M. Smith, Ellerbe; C. M. Smith, Fountain; Mrs. Ernest Smith, Mrs. R. W. 
Smith, Stoneville; Mrs. M. L. Smith, Spencer; Irvin E. Souder, Cumberland 
Gap, Tenn.; Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Speas, Winston-Salem; E. L. Spivey, Charlotte 
Miss Margaret Squier, Thomasville; Mrs. Sue Ellen Stancil, Raleigh; Mrs 
H. R. Starling, Roxboro; Mrs. Albert Stewart, Stoneville; Mrs. Charles D 
Stowe, Winston-Salem; Mrs. Paul Stroud, Goldsboro; Mr. and Mrs. Carl S 
Suggs, Hickory; Mrs. R. B. Suggs. Belmont; Mrs. Betty Surratt, Burlington 
J. W. Suttle, Shelby; Mrs. G. I. Swink, Winston-Salem; Mrs. E. C. Tatum 
Cooleemee; M. N. Teachey, Wallace; Mrs. E. S. Teague, Hickory; L. W. Teague 
Harlem, Ga.; O. B. Teague, Greensboro; Mrs. W. C. Teague, Rocky Mount 
Mrs. J. E. Thomas, Winston-Salem; Mrs. O. E. Triplett. North Wilkesboro 
Mrs. Marvin Trull, Concord; Glenn M. Tucker, Carolina Beach; Mrs. E. W. 
Turner, Miss Hazel Turner, Mocksville; L. S. Turner, Concord; Mrs. Marvin 
M. Turner, Archdale; Miss Mildred Turner, Concord; Mrs. W. W. Turner, 
Princeton; J. W. Tuttle, Winston-Salem; Mrs. W. M. Upchurch, Jr., Mrs. W. M. 
Upchurch, Sr., Durham; Miss Betty Van Hoy, Concord; C. C. Vaughn, Burling- 
ton; Mrs. W. T. Vaughn, Winston-Salem; W. H. Vinson, Jr., Woodland; Mrs. 
George B. Wagoner, Winston-Salem; Mrs. J. W. Wakefield, Sunbury; A. A. 
Walker, Newton; R. L. Wall. Winston-Salem; Mrs. Zeno Wall, Shelby; Miss 
Gloria Watson, Thomasville: O. F. Watts, West Monroe, La.; Mrs. W. L. Weisner, 
Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. C. C. Welch, Franklin; William Welch, Cherokee; 
Mrs. Bradley Wellfare, Winston-Salem; Miss Minerva Wendley, Thomasville; 
Miss Lula West, Greensboro; Avery White, Lexington; Mrs. L. H. White, 
Winston-Salem; Alvis Whitted, Fuquay Springs; Miss Carolyn Wilburn, 
Newton; Mrs. D. H. Wilcox, Winston-Salem; V. L. Wilcox, Kannapolis; J. O. 
Williams, Nashville, Tenn; Roger E. Williams, Jr., Oxford; Mrs. T. C. Wil- 
liams, Jr., Greensboro; Mrs. P. P. Wilson, Leaksville; Mrs. B. E. Winstead, 
Rocky Mount; Charles Wyke, Gastonia; Mrs. Henry Yarbrough, Woodsdale; 
Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Yarbrough, Mrs. Dwight York, Miss Carrie Zimmerman, 
Miss Elizabeth Zimmerman, Winston-Salem. 

Total Visitors — 352. 

Total Messengers and Visitors — 1,653. 



REPORT OF 
THE GENERAL BOARD 



of North Carolina 93 

REPORT OF THE GENERAL BOARD 

82. The General Board presents this report to the one hundred and 
seventeenth session of the Convention, and in doing so expresses 
gratitude for the blessings that have attended the work of the 
Convention this year. 

We call attention to certain items of particular significance, and 
then follow these items with other matters, reports of which are 
required by the Constitution, and then the reports of the various 
departments of the work. 

I. ITEMS OF PARTICULAR SIGNIFICANCE 

A. A Year of Magnificent Opportunities 

83. We believe it safe to say that this year has brought more oppor- 
tunities than any year in our history. The work of the Convention 
is what it is today because in times past the Convention and its 
agencies have met opportunities as they have been presented. 
Even so, we repeat that perhaps this year has been one of unusual 
opportunities. It is our desire to mention these opportunities as 
briefly as possible. 

1. As is well known, the Convention staff has hardly been able 
to do a good job because of crowded conditions in the Raleigh 
office. Much thought has been given in the past two or three years 
in a search for a remedy for these conditions. In 1938 the Con- 
vention bought the Biblical Recorder and the Recorder Building. 
For a time thereafter it was difficult to pay anything on the prin- 
cipal of the money borrowed, but during the past six years the 
Recorder and the building have been paid for with the exception 
of one final small payment. We paid for that building $41,500, and 
we believe it is now worth perhaps twice that amount. 

Let it be recorded here too that we have taken no money from 
the Cooperative Program or the State Mission fund for the liquida- 
tion of this debt. Everyone who has occupied the building, including 
the departments of the Convention, have paid rent into the fund. 
These receipts, plus profits from the Book Store, have paid for the 
building. The question of more space, however, has become a press- 
ing one. Additions could have been made to the Recorder building, 
but it was thought unwise to follow this procedure since building 
costs would have been very high; and in the second place it was 
quite clear that additions, if made, would not prove adequate ten to 
twenty-five years from now. Consequently attention was turned 
toward securing a new site. An opportunity came to get such a site 
in the first block of Hillsboro Street, and since the Convention 
had given authority to the General Board, the opportunity was 
grasped. The lot has a frontage of seventy-five feet on Hillsboro 
Street, and is one hundred and five feet deep. The lot also fronts 
on Morgan Street, where we have a frontage of twenty-four feet. 
On the lot, facing Hillsboro Street, there is a residence, and this 



94 Baptist State Convention 

residence has been converted into commodious offices. Hence, the 
erection of a new building at a time when costs are so high has 
been avoided; and we believe we have a site that will be adequate 
for the next fifty years and even longer. It is believed that over a 
period of a few years the property can be paid for just as has the 
Recorder building. It is not proposed to take money from the Co- 
operative Program or the State Mission fund to pay for the 
property. 

2. Attention was called last year to the fact that the Convention 
had come into possession of the property known as Fruitland Insti- 
tute for about $14,000. Extensive repairs were made to put this 
property in shape for the use of the Ministers' School during the 
winter months, and during the winter of 1946-1947 two six weeks 
schools were held. In passing the Board expresses the opinion that 
no more significant State Mission work has been done in a long, 
long time. 

With the coming of the spring of 1947 further extensive repairs 
and improvements were made. The main school building, with its 
classrooms and auditorium, was put into good condition, and six 
huts added in order to provide for a summer assembly. 

Frankly the Board has spent about double the money it was 
thought at first it would be necessary to expend. It was found that 
the water system was wholly inadequate. During the time the 
property was idle there was great deterioration particularly in the 
water system. 

A successful summer assembly was held, and no debt created 
from operating costs, though naturally little or no profit was made 
to reimburse for capital outlay. Suffice it to say that we have property 
there now worth, we believe, $200,000, and we have invested there 
in the neighborhood of $100,000, including furnishings. 

Three six weeks Ministers' Schools are planned for the fall and 
winter of 1947-1948, and it is believed that the facilities will be taxed 
to the utmost during the assembly season in 1948. 

3. Since Ridgecrest and Fruitland are both in the western part 
of the State, there has been a growing feeling that our Baptist 
people should also have assembly grounds in the eastern part of the 
State. Accordingly the General Board appointed a committee to 
investigate the possible sites. The committee found practically no 
sites on our coast line that were available and at the same time 
accessible. One site was available, and on this site, containing 
some twenty-five acres, the committee found some twenty-five build- 
ings which were considered quite suitable for assembly purposes. 
The committee felt that if this opportunity was missed there might 
not be another. Accordingly, upon the recommendation of the com- 
mittee, the Board authorized that the property be leased for a period 
of six years at about $6,500 a year, with the privilege of purchase 
within the period of the lease for about $93,000. The lease entered 
into provides that any movable property or fixtures placed there by 



of North Carolina 95 

the Convention revert to the Convention in the event the option 
to buy is not exercised within this six-year period. 

The Board believes that the registration fees will probably take 
care of the cost of the lease, and that over a period of a few years 
the property can be paid for without the use of State Mission money 
or Cooperative Program money, in the event it is decided to pur- 
chase the property. It is not now recommended that the property 
be purchased. The period of the lease will provide an opportunity 
to discover whether or not it is wise to purchase. However, in order 
to get started it will be necessary to expend some State Mission 
money for equipment, et cetera. Concerning this one may find a 
recommendation at the end of this report. 

4. In view of the fact that our only Baptist Book Store, located 
in Raleigh, is working under crowded conditions and must for 
sometime continue to do so, and in view of the fact that the services 
of the Book Store have expanded widely during the past year, it 
has been deemed wise to secure a site and open a store in another 
section of the State. It was decided that Charlotte would be the 
most desirable place, and accordingly a committee was appointe 
to investigate. Once again opportunity knocked at our door. A site, 
which is believed to be ideal, was found on North Tryon Street in 
Charlotte. It was discovered, however, that the property could not 
be leased. The committee had no authority from the Convention 
to purchase. A friend was discovered who was willing to buy the 
building, lease it to the Convention, and then sell it later, in the 
event the Convention desired to purchase it. Accordingly a lease was 
procured with an option to buy. Subsequently repairs and changes 
were made to the building, providing for a part of the building to 
be used by the store and the other part to be rented. The cost of the 
building, in the event of purchase, plus changes that have been made, 
will amount to about $90,000. It is believed that this property, located 
as it is, will provide as good an investment as could be found in the 
State. 

The Book Store was opened on October 16 under gratifying 
auspices. It is believed that rents from the building, plus profits from 
the store, will pay for this valuable property within a few years, and 
that at the end of that time the Convention will have an investment 
belonging to State Missions. At the end of this report one will find 
a recommendation concerning this matter. 

5. The schools in the Convention system, plus Wingate which is 
receiving funds from the Convention on a comparable basis, will this 
year receive from the Convention for current support something in 
excess of $300,000. In these Baptist institutions of ours there are 
enrolled perhaps about 4,000 Baptist students. By way of compari- 
son, it is to be noted that there are around 1,800 at Chapel 
Hill, perhaps 1,500 at State College in Raleigh, and at least 2,500 
more in other State institutions. We must, of course, continue to 
support our own institutions, but we must not neglect these Bap- 
tist students in the State institutions. 



96 Baptist State Convention 

For some years the Convention has owned a Student House at 
Woman's College in Greensboro. Recently there came to the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Board an opportunity to lease for twelve 
months a piece of property in Chapel Hill, which property is ideally 
located for a student center. The property has been leased, and steps 
have been taken to secure the money for the purchase of this site, 
and for the erection eventually of an adequate center there for the 
Baptist boys and girls attending the University. 

In time some State Mission money will be required for this and 
similar enterprises, but at the moment the Board is not recommend- 
ing that State Mission funds be allocated for this purpose. Rather it is 
making a report to the Convention that it is trying to be alert to the 
needs that face us. We look to our Baptist institutions for leader- 
ship for the churches in the years to come, but it is quite clear that 
the churches need leadership far in excess of that which can be 
furnished by our own schools. Consequently it would be wholly 
unwise for the denomination, from any point of view, to neglect 
the students who desire to attend the State institutions. 

6. There are now around 2,700 Baptist churches in the State. 
At the moment no accurate report can be given of the number of 
new churches that have been established during the past year. It is 
known, however, that there have been a great number, and that 
many of these have requested from the Board money with which to 
purchase lots. Many lots have been purchased in growing centers, 
and, in a few instances, where churches wished to relocate. Requests 
have been so many that in some cases these new churches have 
been told they would have to wait a year or two before the needs 
could be supplied. The Board finds that the policy it is now follow- 
ing in buying new lots greatly encourages the establishment of 
new churches. It has been found also that this policy enables the 
churches to get well chosen and adequate lots, and from this point 
of view this policy to purchase lots is wise. Many churches in times 
past have purchased lots that turned out to be wholly inadequate, 
either because some friends gave the property, or because for lack 
of funds the churches were unable to purchase the sites that were 
needed. This one item alone has drawn heavily upon our State Mission 
fund this year. It is a pity the Convention cannot provide a fund to 
help new churches get started on their buildings; or a capital fund 
that could be loaned to the churches for this purpose. 

The significant opportunities listed above deserve an additional 
word of comment. It is believed that most of these projects referred 
to will be self-liquidating. It is, of course, necessary to spend some 
money to get them started. With reference to the purchase of lots 
for churches, it is known from experience that such an act of help 
to a new church ties that church on to the denominational program, 
because the denomination thus expresses interest in a very vital 
way. Such expenditures come back to the Convention many fold in 
the years to come, and the contributions from these churches aid 
not merely State Missions but all our work. It is in this sense 



or North Carolina 97 

that State Missions is always the basis of supply for all work done 
by our conventions, both State and Southern. 

For the first time in fifteen years, because of all the things we have 
listed above, the Board faces a deficit in its State Mission fund at 
the end of this year unless perchance, as is devoutly hoped, the 
churches provide the greatest State Mission offering during the 
month of October that we have ever had. It is believed that next 
year cannot possibly bring as many challenging opportunities as 
has this year. Given, therefore, two or three years, the Board 
believes that the deficit, if any, can be met, and with all of us 
working together the Convention will soon own a new headquarters 
site, a building in Charlotte, two assembly grounds, one in the East 
and one in the West, and also one or more adequate student centers 
near the campuses of our State institutions. 

Baptists have always been known for their aggressiveness. This 
spirit must not be lost now that so many challenging opportunities 
are coming to us. 

B. The Convention's Income 

84. It may be a surprise to many, but our Baptist people are not 
giving as much money in 1947 as they gave in 1946. Through the Co- 
operative Program they are giving about 10 per cent more, and 
regular designations are running a little ahead of the year 1946. 
This year, however, there has been no concerted effort to get a large 
sum of money for world relief. That is why our people as a whole 
are giving less money than they did last year. It was hoped that 
the advance in the Cooperative Program would be much larger since 
the total last year showed that they could give the money. The 
Mother's Day offering for the Hospital was only slightly in advance 
of what it was in 1946; and with the increased cost, as will be seen 
from the report, the Hospital faces a deficit. We should have a Co- 
operative Program goal next year of at least $1,500,000, and since, 
as was said above, the Hospital will come to the end of this year 
with a deficit, we should have a goal for the Mother's Day offering 
for next year of at least $150,000. A recommendation concerning 
these matters will be found at the end of this report. 

In connection with the income of the Convention, the effort to 
secure 100,000 tithers in North Carolina is of prime importance. 
It is believed at this writing that there are perhaps 40,000 tithers in 
the State. We have a long way to go to reach the goal of 100,000, but 
it can be recorded here that the churches are making far more effort 
than ever before to enlist tithers to support the whole program of the 
church, both at home and abroad. It is hoped that by the end of the 
year we will have reached the goal of 100,000. If we can do that, or 
anything approaching that figure, we should have a Cooperative 
Program income in 1948 of at least $1,500,000. 

In this connection also another matter is worthy of attention. The 
people in the churches will this year bring into the treasury of their 

7 



98 Baptist State Convention 

churches approximately $12,500,000. Of this amount $10,000,000 
will be for local expenses, and, therefore, $2,500,000 for the objects 
of the Conventions, State and Southern. It is not here contended 
that the churches are expending too much of the total income on 
themselves, so to speak. Probably every dollar, and more, is needed. 
If, however, the objects of the Convention are to receive the income 
they must have in these great days of opportunity here in North 
Carolina and in the world around, the total income of the churches 
must be greatly increased. It is believed that the tithe, thus pro- 
viding for greatly increased offerings, is the answer to the chal- 
lenge. Perhaps there is no other answer. 

C. Associational Missionaries 

85. Some few years ago there were in the State about half a dozen 
Associational Missionaries. At the present writing there are about 
forty-two. More accurate figures and facts concerning this work 
will be found elsewhere in the report. We mention it here to say we 
believe the plan now being followed bids fair to help in the 
development of our churches more than any plan that has before 
been tried. The Associational Missionary or Field Worker approaches 
during the year in some vital and significant way nearly all our 
churches. It is in the main a rural church program, except in name. 
Most churches now with as many as four hundred members find it 
possible to employ an Educational Director to assist the pastor in the 
vital work of training. Obviously the smaller churches, half time 
and quarter time, cannot do this. The Associational Missionary or 
Field Worker partially answers the need for providing some help 
for these churches. The Board does not believe it wise to employ 
people and send them into the associations, paying their full sup- 
port. Rather it is believed to be a wiser policy for the Board to 
share in the support, leaving it to the Association itself to employ 
the worker and pay the remainder of the support. In this way the 
associations can feel that the workers belong to them. At the moment 
we are happy to report that there appears to be the finest sort of co- 
operation. And let it be said once more that the Convention is not 
forgetting the smaller churches. 

D. Utilizing Our Young People 

86. Elsewhere in the report more specific attention will be given 
this question of utilizing our young people from the colleges in our 
churches, large and small. We merely wish to record here our belief 
that this new emphasis that is being made will first of all aid the 
churches, secondly be of great benefit to the young people in 
providing them the needed experience, and thirdly provide the young 
people with some income which can be used for further educational 
purposes. The Board is undertaking to provide work in the churches, 
associations, or assemblies, for all young ministers who desire such 
work, and likewise other young men and young women who plan to 



of North Carolina 99 

give their full time to Christian work in the years ahead. Churches, 
large and small, therefore, are urged to use these young people dur- 
ing the summer months. One would not say that only the young 
can reach the young; but one can safely say that a pastor who has 
one of these fine young workers can the more easily reach these 
young people. 

E. Widows' Supplemental Annuity Plan 

87. With the beginning of 1947 this plan was inaugurated. Many 
pastors have entered, but far, far too many have not yet seen the 
necessity of doing it, or have not found it possible to do so. The 
Board would earnestly urge the ministers to take advantage of this 
very fine plan whereby the minister himself pays only one-half of 
the cost, the Convention paying the other one-half. 

F. The Convention's Enlargement Program for 
Wake Forest 

88. This particular matter has not been committed to the General 
Board, but rather to a special committee of seventeen. In any event, 
the Board would call it to the attention of our people, and offer con- 
gratulations to the special committee and to Brother Horace Eason, 
the Director. At this writing reports received from many sources 
indicate that the prospects for reaching the goal are very, very 
bright. The Board, however, would earnestly urge the churches to 
make every possible effort to meet the requests that have been made 
of them without subtracting a dollar from the amount which ought 
to be given through the Cooperative Program. Unless this is done we 
could easily reach the goal of a million and a half for Wake Forest, 
but in doing so allow all objects that share in the program to suffer. 
Such a condition ought to be avoided, and every effort should be 
made toward that end. 

G. Changes in Personnel 

89. We reported last year that Fon H. Scofield, Jr., had accepted 
the position of Secretary of Visual Education, Radio and Publicity. 
We call attention to it here because the year 1947 will be the first 
full year of the operation of this department. We are gratified at 
the fine beginning that has been made. 

Likewise a year ago we reported that J. C. Canipe has accepted the 
position of Secretary of Evangelism. He has continued the excellent 
work as head of the Ministers' School at Fruitland, and during the 
year has been able to touch many individual churches and assist in 
conducting simultaneous evangelistic efforts. 

We record also the fact that the Rev. James W. Ray, pastor of the 
Spindale Church, accepted the offer of the Board to become State 
Student Secretary. He has moved to Raleigh, and has entered with 
enthusiasm upon his duties. The Board feels that a wise choice has 
been made, and that he will make a remarkably fine leader for the 
young people in our colleges. 



100 Baptist State Convention 

In this connection we call attention to the fact that we now have a 
better and more complete staff than ever before in this vital part of 
our work. 

Also we call attention to the election during the year of the Rev. 
L. J. Newton as Associate in the Training Union Department. He 
brings to his new task a well trained mind, a strong body, and much 
enthusiasm. 

H. Home for Aged People 

90. The Board has been aware for some time of the great need for 
the establishment of a home for aged people. A committee has been 
appointed to study this matter, and is at work, but it is not possible 
at this time to make any definite proposal. It is, however, believed 
that the time has come for the Convention to get behind this very 
important matter. (See recommendation at the close of this report.) 

91. II. REPORT OF GENERAL BOARD MEETINGS 

Meeting Held January 20, 1947 

1. Clyde E. Baucom was elected President, W. E. Stanley, Vice 
President, and C. B. Deane, Secretary. 

2. The Board considered at length the question" of establishing an 
FM radio station, as recommended by the special Radio Committee. 
The committee indicated that the cost for establishing the station 
would probably be in the neighborhood of $35,000, but it was not 
made clear as to the annual cost of the station, and how such cost 
could be met. The matter was referred to the committee again for 
further study, and that committee, in cooperation with the Execu- 
tive Committee, was given power to act. In this connection it should 
be recorded that the Board was unable to set up in the 1947 budget 
an amount sufficient to cover the cost of establishing the station. 

At a subsequent meeting of the Executive Committee the General 
Secretary was authorized and instructed to proceed with the neces- 
sary steps to file an application for the establishment of a one 
hundred thousand watt FM station, to be located in or near Raleigh. 

Then at a meeting on March 28, the Executive Committee author- 
ized the General Secretary to employ an expert to investigate this 
matter and find out as nearly as possible what the initial cost would 
be, and also the annual outlay that would be necessary once the 
station was established. 

At the meeting of the Board in June the report of the expert was 
presented, and the general consensus of opinion was that it would 
not be feasible to think of establishing a station at this time. How- 
ever, it was voted to re-submit the whole matter to the Radio Com- 
mittee, and that the committee, in cooperation with the Executive 
Committee, should study the matter, in the light of information at 
hand, and make a report to the Board at the pre-convention meeting. 

3. T. E. Story of Wilkesboro was named to membership on the 
General Board to fill the place made vacant by reason of the depar- 
ture of David Browning from the State. 



or North Carolina 101 

4. The following were named to membership on the Executive 
Committee: Louis S. Ganes, T. C. Johnson, C. Slyvester Green, John 
W. Lambert, W. E. Stanley, Howard G. Dawkins, with C. E. Baucom, 
President of the Board, and C. C. Warren, President of the Conven- 
tion, as ex officio members. 

5. Upon the recommendation of the Benevolence Committee, a 
committee was appointed to work in cooperation with the Board of 
Trustees of the Orphanage to suggest possible plans for the expan- 
sion of the Orphanage work, either by enlarging the present plant, 
or locating new homes. 

At the June meeting of the Board this committee reported that 
the matter had been investigated, and that the recommendation of 
the committee was that no change should be made in the set-up of the 
Orphanage at present. 

6. It was voted that a committee be appointed to study the ques- 
tion of the establishment of a home for aged people. 

7. Authority was given to refinance the loan of the North Caro- 
lina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated, in the amount of $155,000, if 
such refinancing was found desirable. Subsequently it was decided 
to leave the loan with the Security Life and Trust Company. 

8. The Board approved the recommendations of the Committee on 
Education, which recommendations followed those of the Council 
on Christian Education. Of particular import was the agreement to 
pay Gardner-Webb College during 1947 for current support an 
amount similar to that paid Campbell College. 

9. The Executive Committee was given authority to borrow an 
amount not to exceed $50,000.00 in anticipation of current revenue. 

10. It was decided to continue the Advisory Committee on the 
Rural Church, and in addition to name a new committee to con- 
tinue to study the matter. 

11. The Board, following the action of the Convention concerning 
the sale of the present Recorder Building and/or securing a new site, 
authorized the borrowing of an amount not to exceed $100,000 for 
the purpose of making additions to, or repairs on the Biblical Re- 
corder Building. Subsequently it was deemed wise, with building 
costs so high, not to make additions to the Recorder Building, but 
instead to purchase a new site. This was done, and a new site front- 
ing both on Hillsboro and Morgan streets was purchased for the 
sum of $67,407.26. 

12. The committee appointed a committee of five whose duty it 
would be to explore the possibility of sites, one or more, in the 
eastern part of the State for assembly grounds, a report to be 
made to the Board in the June meeting. (Subsequent actions follow- 
ing this authority will be found in another part of the report, and 
we shall not repeat them here.) 

13. A committee was named to study the possibilities for estab- 
lishing branch book stores. (Actions concerning this matter arc 
given elsewhere in the report.) 



102 Baptist State Convention 

14. The title of General Missionaries Earle L. Bradley, J. C. Pipes, 
and E. L. Spivey was changed to Field Secretaries, and it was also 
suggested that the Associational Missionaries be called "Associa- 
tional Workers." 

15. The basic salary schedule of the general workers of the Con- 
vention was not changed except in a few cases. In lieu of an 
increase in the salary schedule, a "cost of living supplement" was 
voted providing for a temporary increase of from 7V& per cent to 12 
per cent for the first six months of the year. In the June meeting it 
was voted to continue this supplement for the last six months also. 
This supplement also applied to the Associational Workers in so far 
as the Convention was responsible for their support. 

Executive Committee Meetings, April 5 and 16 

92. The General Board in its January meeting appointed a com- 
mittee to explore the possibilities of establishing a book store in 
Charlotte. This committee made its recommendations to the Execu- 
tive Committee, in meeting on April 5, and the Executive Committee 
took the following action: 

Whereas the General Board, in session January 21, 1947, 
authorized the appointment of a committee to consider the advis- 
ability of establishing an additional book store in North Caro- 
lina, and 

Whereas this committee has made its recommendation that a 
store be established in Charlotte. 

Now, Therefore, Be it Resolved 

1. That property on North Try on Street next to the public 
library be leased for a period of ten years at a price of $625 
a month. 

2. That the lease be made with the provision that at the end 
of the nine months period from the date of the signing of the 
lease there shall be an option to purchase the property for 
$70,000 plus accumulated taxes of about $500; and that with 
the purchase of the property the lease shall terminate. 

3. That the President of the General Board and the General 
Secretary of the Convention be authorized and instructed to 
sign all legal papers necessary to consummate the transaction 
herein provided for. 

Be it Further Resolved 

That the General Secretary be authorized to negotiate a loan 
in an amount not to exceed $12,000 for the purpose of making 
alterations and repairs to the building, and for paying the 
lease and other expenses until such time as the store shall be 
able to pay the expenses out of net earnings; and that the 
President of the General Board and the General Secretary and 
Treasurer be authorized to sign a note to secure said loan." 



of North Carolina 103 

In accordance with the instructions the property on North Tryon 
Street was leased for a period of ten years at a price of $625 a 
month, with the provision that at the end of the nine months period 
from the date of the signing of the lease the Convention might pur- 
chase the property at a price of $70,000.00 plus accrued taxes of 
about $500. 

At a meeting of the Executive Committee on April 16 a resolu- 
lution was adopted providing for the lease of the property at Fort 
Fisher, it being provided in the lease that the cost of lease shall be 
$6,000.00 a year, and that at any time within the six-year period 
of the lease the Convention may purchase the property for about 
$93,500. 

Other provisions in the lease state that improvements made by 
the Convention are to be at the expense of the Convention, and in 
the event of option to purchase is not exercised, such improve- 
ments or repairs shall remain the property of the Convention, with 
the exception of additions or repairs that cannot well be removed, 
once they are made, without injury to the property. 

In connection with this lease the General Secretary was author- 
ized to advance from State Mission funds an amount necessary to 
pay the cost of the lease for one year and to purchase such equip- 
ment as it appeared could be purchased at a price not likely to 
obtain in 1948. 

Meeting June 17 Held in Murphy 

93. Actions of the Executive Committee, to which reference has 
already been made, were approved. In addition only routine mat- 
ters were dealt with, and it is not thought necessary to refer to 
them here. 

Pre-convention Meeting, October 28 

94. At this meeting the actions of the Executive Committee in the 
interim between the June meeting of the Board and the meeting on 
October 28 were approved. These actions are reported as follows: 

1. James W. Ray was elected to the position of State Student Sec- 
retary. 

2. The Executive Committee was authorized to borrow $40,000 for 
a period of 120 days at an interest rate of IVz per cent. 

3. A new rent schedule for the Recorder Building and the Hillsboro 
Street offices was set up. 

4. Property in Chapel Hill was leased for one year, with option to 
purchase within that period, if the funds for such purchase, viz., 
$35,000, can be raised. 

5. It was decided to hold the Pastors' School for the eastern section 
of the State in 1948 at Seaside Assembly, this action being taken 
after conference with the authorities at Wake Forest, where the 
school has been held for several years. 

6. A new plan for work with the Indians of the Burnt Swamp Asso- 
ciation, whereby there will be employed members of their own 



104 Baptist State Convention 

race who have been trained, their salaries to be paid by the 
Convention, with the understanding that the churches of the 
Association channel their gifts for Convention objects through the 
treasury of the Convention. 

In addition to the approval of the above actions of the Executive 
Committee, the Board took the following actions: 

1. The Board went on record as favoring cooperation with the 
church at Chapel Hill, and providing a larger amount for the 
support of the pastor. It also expressed interest in providing some 
support for the pastor at Wake Forest, in the event that church 
desired such assistance. 

2. The Executive Committee was given authority, in the event the 
lease is approved by the Convention, to elect a General Director 
for Seaside Assembly. 

3. Final action in the matter of establishing a radio station or pro- 
viding for a studio for the purpose of providing stations and 
churches with transcriptions went over for further consideration 
and report to the meeting of the Board in January, 1948. 

4. The Report of the Committee on the Rural Church was adopted. 
The report follows: 

"After two meetings of the Committee on Rural Churches, 
and after a conference of a sub-committee with Dr. Blanton 
and Dr. Kitchin of Wake Forest College, we make the follow- 
ing recommendations to the General Board: 

"1. That we commend all the work being done through all 
the departments of our State Convention, including that of the 
Associational Missionaries, Pastors' Schools, Deacons' Schools, 
and Summer Work Program. 

"2. That beginning July 1, 1948, the General Board, in co- 
operation with Wake Forest College, set up a Department of 
Rural Church Work, it being understood that the General Board 
shall make an appropriation of about $3,000 and the college 
an appropriation of about $3,000 per year for this department; 
and further that the General Board and the college work to- 
gether in securing the proper person for this department; 
and that the work of this department have at least a threefold 
purpose: (1) Instruction in the college in rural church 
work, (2) Research, compilation and distribution of information 
concerning all phases of rural church work, and (3) Field work 
in connection with local churches, associations, and pastors." 

III. THE COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 

A. Support of the Program 

95. The Cooperative Program grows in favor with our people. At 
the present writing it appears that total receipts through the Program 
will be about $1,275,000 for the calendar year. This is $225,000 short 



of North Carolina 105 

of the goal we hoped to reach this year, and represents about a ten 
per cent advance over 1946. In that connection, let it be recorded 
that the convention workers, pastors, and others have given much 
attention during recent months in an attempt to find 100,000 mem- 
bers of our churches who would undertake to tithe their income 
into the treasuries of the churches. At this writing it is believed that 
there are in the State perhaps 50,000 tithers. Hence we are still far, 
far from our goal, but it is contemplated that a thorough check-up 
will be made at the end of the year, and when this is done it is 
hoped we will find that we have reached a number far beyond the 
fifty thousand. We record here again our belief that we shall never 
have the money we need for a world program at home and abroad 
until the members of our churches are led to adopt stewardship as a 
principle for living, and tithing as the most specific expression of 
that stewardship. 

The members of our churches will bring into the treasuries of the 
churches this year about $12,500,000. Of this amount about $10,- 
000,000 will remain in the churches for their own use, leaving about 
$2,500,000 for the objects of the conventions, State and Southern. 

Are we growing more missionary minded? In 1934 when our 
total gifts for everything, local and otherwise amounted to about 
$2,500,000, we gave 19.7 per cent of that amount to the objects of 
the conventions. In 1940 our total gifts amounted to a little over 
$4,000,000, and that year we gave 19.7 per cent of it to the objects 
of the Convention. In 1945 we gave about $10,140,000, and in that 
year we gave 22.6 per cent of the total to objects of the con- 
ventions. 

These figures appear to indicate that we are not growing as mis- 
sionary minded as we had thought. 

In addition, therefore, to urging our people to tithe, we believe 
it would be wise for our churches to undertake to give a larger per 
cent of their total gifts to the objects fostered by the conventions. 
It is hoped that every church, no matter how small, will undertake 
to give at least 25 per cent of the total amount raised to objects of 
the conventions; that churches with a membership of four to five 
hundred will attempt to give at least 33 1/3 per cent of the total, 
and the churches with memberships above five hundred will under- 
take to give at least 50 per cent of the total for objects of the con- 
ventions. When we have reached goals like that, it can be truly 
said of us that we are becoming missionary minded. 

We should continue to stress with all fervor the Cooperative 
Program, and yet in cooperation with the Southern Convention some 
special days should be observed throughout the year. These special 
days are: 

Home and Foreign Mission Day — Some Sunday in March. 
Hospital — Mother's Day in May. 
Christian Education Day — Fourth Sunday in June. 
State Missions — Fourth Sunday in October. 
Orphanage — Thanksgiving Day. 



106 Baptist State Convention 

96. B. The Promotion of the Program 

The Convention last year decided to divide our income with 
the Southern Convention on a fifty-fifty basis. At the same time it 
was decided that mony expended for the promotion of that program 
should be charged to the program before making a division of the 
funds as between the State and Southern Conventions. Therefore for 
the first time the salaries of the Field Secretaries Earle L. Bradley, 
E. L. Spivey, J. C. Pipes, have been charged to the program. Like- 
wise, the amount sent to the associations to help in providing for 
Associational Workers has been charged to the Cooperative Pro- 
gram. We, therefore, present here brief reports from the Field Secre- 
taries, together with a report of W. G. Bullard, Superintendent of 
Associational Missions. 

97. 1. Field Secretaries 

We call attention to the reports of our three field secretaries. We 
need not point out that brief reports such as are given here can tell 
but little of the real work that is done by these faithful men, nor is 
there any way that we can measure the results of their labors. 

(a) Earle L. Bradley 

This has been a very busy year, and yet a good year. I regret that 
I have been unable to answer all the calls and trust that a second 
invitation will be given if the first one could not be accepted. 

I think we are making progress. There is much to be done but 
slowly but surely we are on our way to greater things. 

It has been a very busy year and the following is what I have 
tried to do this year: 

Attended 30 District Associations. 

Ten Schools for Deacons. 

Seven stewardship and mission schools. 

Seven revivals. 

Supplied for 27 pastors and pastorless churches. 

One Enlargement Campaign. 

Conducted one Pastors' School. 

Preached at two homecomings. 

Spoke to five W.M.U.'s. 

Attended one Regional meeting of W.M.U. 

Spoke to four Sunday schools. 

One teachers' and officers' meeting. 

Spoke to two D.V.B. schools. 

Conducted four funerals. 

Two Broadcasts. 

One Chapel talk. 

Attended seven Pastors' conferences. 

Meeting of General Board. 

State Baptist Convention. 

• 



of North Carolina 107 

Southern Baptist Convention. 
Conference at Fruitland. 

And had many conferences concerning lots, schools of deacons and 
missions and the work in general. 

(b) J. C. Pipes 

Below is a brief summary of the work I have done as field secre- 
tary of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina from Octo- 
ber 1, 1946, to September 30, 1947: 

Attended six annual associational meetings. 

Attended one annual meeting of "Woman's Missionary Union. 

Held thirteen stewardship revivals of one week each. 

Held six revival meetings. 

Conducted seven one-week preachers' schools. 

Worked in five schools of missions. 

Worked at Fruitland in pastors' school for six weeks. 

Held five one-week deacons' schools. 

Attended the meeting of the General Board in January. 

Attended numbers of one-day pastors' conferences. 

Supplied twelve times for pastors. 

Attended one one-week evangelistic conference at Fruitland. 

Attended Baptist State Convention. 

The year's work has been strenuous. I have had more calls than 
I could possibly fill. The outlook for the future is hopeful. We crave 
strength that we may carry on in this great work for the Master. 
The longer we serve in this field the greater we see the need that our 
people shall see a lost world through the mind of Jesus and dedicate 
themselves and all in their possession to making Him and His way 
of life a reality in the good earth He has given us. 

We desire and earnestly covet the prayers of all our Baptist 
hosts that our common Saviour and Lord may give us strength to 
fulfill that to which He has called us in our great State and to the 
ends of the earth. 

(c) E. L. Spivey 

From October 1, 1946 through September 30, 1947, I participated 
in: 

15 Annual Associational Meetings 
9 Stewardship-Missions Schools 

4 Pastors' Schools 

5 Associational-Wide Deacons' Schools 
10 Evangelistic Meetings 

2 Deacons' Conferences (Addressed) 
2 Ordination Services for Deacons (Preached) 
4 New Church Fields (Surveyed) 
20 Churches supplied on Sundays 
4 Woman's Missionary Union Groups (Addressed) 
1 Church and Associational Officers' Revival 



108 Baptist State Convention 

10 Associational Pastors' Conferences (Addressed) 
16 Conferences with Associational Missionaries, Moderators, and 
Pastors relative to Pastors', Deacons', Stewardship, and Mis- 
sions Schools 
6 Radio Services (Spoke) 
2 Dedicatory Services (Churches) 

6 High School and College Chapel Services 
2 Weddings (Officiated) 

7 Services for Choir Groups — S. S. banquets, Civic Clubs 
(Messages) 

I attended the Baptist State Convention, Southern Baptist Con- 
vention, two General Board Meetings, Foreign Missions Conference, 
b'ruitland Planning Conference, Sunday School Convention, and 
Mecklenburg Bible Clinic. 

The Ministers' Retirement and Widows' Annuity plans were pre- 
sented to several churches and several pastors. 

The above services necessitated many miles of travel, the writing 
oil numerous cards and letters, the sending of telegrams and making 
oL' telephone calls. 

Now, may I express my sincere gratitude to our general Secretary, 
Mr. M. A. Huggins, and others who have given me such full encour- 
agement and cooperation, in the task delegated to my hands. I pledge 
afresh my loyalty to these leaders and "laborers together," to the 
pastors and people of our convention, and to Christ the Great Head 
of the Church. 

2. Associational Missions 

G. W. Bullard 
98. Superintendent of Associational Missions 

The program of associational missions continues to enlarge as more 
and more capable men and women enter the work. When the Con- 
vention met last year 32 associations had missionaries with some 
seven or eight others looking for suitable persons to serve in this 
capacity. During the year 18 persons have been employed by the 
associations, with eight resigning to enter other fields. This leaves a 
present force of 42 missionaries. At least ten other associations are 
now looking for missionaries. Some of them are in touch with 
prospects but the matter has not been settled. It looks as if there will 
be at least 50 persons engaged in this work within a few months. Of 
those leaving the work, J. R. Featherston, Gaston; Fritz D. Hemp- 
hill, Mecklenburg; Waldo D. Early, New South River; and Clarence 
O. Vance, Tuckaseigee, returned to the pastorate. Miss Gretchen 
Johnson, Haywood, and Miss Zula Rogers, Little River, resigned to 
enter a Theological Seminary. Mrs. Ted G. Braswell, South Moun- 
tain, returned to public school teaching, and Miss Kathleen Vestal, 
Yadkin, resigned to become Mrs. F. Bernard LeSueur. These 
"wrought well" and we wish for them continued success. 

The following have come to the work during the year: Ella Sue 
Gravitte, Beulah; Frank Robinson, Blue Ridge; G. W. H. White, 



of North Carolina 109 

Brunswick and Dock; Roger E. Williams, Jr., Flat River; W. Van 
Carroll, Liberty; W. B. Guthrie, New South River; C. W. Bazemore, 
Roanoke; J. Thad Ashley, Roanoke; T. W. Bray, Rowan; Henry 
Powell, Sandy Creek; S. Guy Walker, Sandy Run; A. A. Walker, 
South Fork; Mrs. Ted G. Braswell, South Mountain; Lysbeth Cox, 
South Mountain; Norwood Davis, Stanley; Juanita Davis, Three 
Forks; F. B. Clark, Transylvania; and Mrs. Mae Grigg, Yadkin. 

In addition to the cooperation of each department, the State Con- 
vention assists in at least three definite ways to make this work 
possible and successful. One-fourth to one-half of the support of these 
missionaries comes from funds contributed through the Convention. 
The proportion depends upon the size of the associational budget 
and the ability to meet it. It should also be said the Home Mission 
Board assisted this year with the support of seven missionaries as a 
part of their City Mission program. In the second place, the Con- 
vention makes available the services of a Superintendent of Asso- 
ciational Missions, who seeks to assist the missionaries in every way 
possible with their work. The third contribution is the State Plan- 
ning Conference. The missionaries assembled at Fruitland, Decem- 
ber 13-17 for a period of instruction and planning. During the first 
sessions every phase of the Baptist Program was presented. The 
secretary of each department had an opportunity to present the plans 
of his organization for the year. This information was given in out- 
lined form in a uniform notebook provided for each missionary. A 
calendar of activities was also distributed which included all State 
and Southern Convention dates for the calendar year. After receiv- 
ing requests for assistance with special projects, the department 
secretaries met with the General Secretary and planned for all co- 
operative campaigns for 1947. Types of efforts, places and dates 
were agreed upon. The last part of the conference was given to re- 
defining the work of associational missions, and to expressions from 
the missionaries themselves. Necessary information was gathered to 
enable the missionaries to prepare a calendar of activities in their 
associations. A similar meeting is planned for November 13-15 in 
Winston-Salem to plan the work for 1948. 

An associational mission program includes, (1) general promotion 
work; (2) enlisting and assisting the local churches; and (3) reach- 
ing out to the people of unreached areas. With all this involved it is 
impossible to give a complete summary of the activities of the 42 
missionaries. The following facts, compiled from their reports for the 
first nine months of 1947, will, however, reveal something of the 
result of their efforts. They assisted with the promotion of 50 simul- 
taneous or central campaigns. Eight hundred and eighty-two churches 
participated with an average attendance of more than 28,000 people. 
These campaigns included, Schools of Missions, Sunday School and 
Training Union Campaigns; Stewardship Emphasis, Evangelistic 
meetings, Schools for Deacons, etc. The reports list 939 professions 
of faith and 676 new church members. Eighteen new churches have 
been organized under the supervision of the missionaries, and 18 



110 Baptist State Convention 

new mission Sunday schools or branch stations started. There are 
now 30 of these mission stations in operation. Conferences, both 
individual and group, occupy much of the time of these workers. 
During the period mentioned above, they reported 4,718 individual 
and 1,554 group or committee conferences. These workers have 
responded to calls for assistance with every phase of activity in 
the individual church. Pulpit supply, training schools, Bible schools, 
revival meetings, stewardship campaigns, and W. M. U. meetings, 
present the greatest opportunities for service. 

As we pray for this group of workers we need to also "pray ye 
therefore the Lord of harvest, that he will send forth laborers into 
his harvest." 

IV. STATE MISSIONS 

99. 1. Missionary Pastoral Assistance 

We give below a summary of the work done by our missionary 
pastors from October 1, 1946, through September 30, 1947, as shown 
by their monthly reports to this office: 

Number of Missionary Pastors 71 

Number of churches aided 107 

Sermons 6,292 

Other addresses 2,541 

Revivals held 154 

Training Classes conducted 76 

Visits made 30,936 

Conversions 1,426 

Baptisms 1,056 

Additions other than by baptism 863 

Churches repaired or being built 21 

Subscriptions to Charity and Children 166 

Subscriptions to Biblical Recorder 309 

Subscription to mission magazines 378 

Gifts reported from the churches during the period: 

Building and Repairs $121,846 

Pastors' Salaries 87,466 

Undesignated Cooperative Program 17,073 

State Missions 1,086 

Home Missions 871 

Foreign Missions (Including Relief ) 3,425 

Heck Memorial 118 

Education 1,716 

Orphanage 7,188 

Aid in Evangelistic Meetings 2,478 

Hospital 1,436 

Local Charity, Red Cross, etc 1,730 

American Bible Society 91 

Associational Missions 1,601 

Ministers' Relief 173 

Total $248,208 



of North Carolina 111 

100. 2. Church Extension 

The Board has continued its policy of purchasing lots, in so far 
as money is available for this purpose. Never has the opportunity 
been greater. Many new churches are being established, and we have 
far more calls than we can answer. It is to be regretted that we 
do not have a great deal more money to use in this most important 
phase of our work. We continue to have calls for help on buildings, 
but we are unable to help because the amount in our State Mission 
fund does not permit. Many thousands of dollars could be spent in 
this way each year to great advantage in helping our churches to 
help themselves through better equipment and more adequate 
buildings. 

We give below a statement of funds expended from October 1, 
1946, through September 30, 1947: 

Church Association Amount 

Kellum ...Atlantic $ 750.00 

Mitchell Chapel Beulah 375.00 

Gospel Tabernacle Brushy Mountain 600.00 

Mount Pleasant ...Cabarrus 450.00 

Fairfield Chowan 149.91 

Calvary French Broad 175.00 

Sunset Forest Gaston 600.00 

Elizabeth Mecklenburg 1,500.00 

Faith Mount Zion 400.00 

Greenleaf Neuse 350.00 

Kirkwood Piedmont 400.00 

Archdale Randolph 500.00 

Oakhurst , Randolph 925.00 

Gaston Roanoke 2,000.00 

West End Memorial Roanoke 400.00 

West Inness Street Rowan 240.00 

Hudson Chapel South Fork 200.00 

Mount Vernon.. Surry 275.00 

Topton Western North Carolina 70.00 

Forest Hills Wilmington 250.00 



Total $10,609.91 

101. 3. Summer Student Program 

We are happy to report that 67 ministerial students and young 
women preparing for full time Christian service worked during 
this year as a part of the Summer Student Program. An effort was 
made to offer work to every qualified student who desired it. A 
few were not placed, however, largely because so many of the 
applications were late coming to us. 21 of these young people were 
employed by individual churches for the entire summer. A sum- 
mary of the activities of the summer workers will not include the 
work of these 21 since they were supported altogether by the 



112 Baptist State Convention 

churches using their services. The Convention simply served to 
gather information about the students and make it available. It 
should be stated, however, that their activities were varied. They 
served as pastor's assistants; educational directors; music directors, 
office secretaries; recreational leaders; and, a combination of these 
and many other duties. A large number of the churches using these 
young folks do not employ full time workers but found the services 
of a student for the summer very valuable. Many other churches 
used students for the summer but made their contacts direct. We 
say this to emphasize that many young people were used whose 
activities are not covered in this report. Mr. Morgan of the Sunday 
School Division, and Mr. Gibson of the Training Union Division, 
also used 39 students in their programs. 

Of the 46 not employed by a local church, one was assigned to 
work with a mission church; another served as chaplain of a State 
Training School; and the others were assigned to associations. These 
worked with an associational missionary or a committee appointed 
to direct their activities. 

It is impossible to give a complete picture of all that was done 
by these young people. However, this brief summary of facts will 
give an idea of their activities. They worked in 469 different 
churches, conducting 303 Vacation Bible Schools, 13 Training Union 
Study Courses and 13 Sunday School Study Courses. 19,241 persons 
were enrolled in the Bible Schools with an average attendance of 
16,932. 947 people were enrolled in the study courses with an 
average attendance of 742. 655 training course awards were re- 
quested. The group preached 280 sermons; taught 200 Sunday 
School lessons; presented 22 Training Union programs; and con- 
ducted 205 miscellaneous services. These miscellaneous services 
included vesper services; jail services; prayer meetings; youth coun- 
cils; church library conferences; socials; song services; and, religious 
census and Sunday School clinics. 548 conversions were reported 
with 417 additions to the churches. The group made 3,109 home 
visits. Denominational causes were presented to the people in 
nearly every church where these young people worked, and the 
mission offerings amounted to more than $3,000.00. 

The student group this year represented all of our Baptist colleges 
in North Carolina, and two of our Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminaries. We believe that these students will go back to their 
schools better equipped because of this experience to make prepara- 
tion for effective Christian service. 

102. 4. Department of Evangelism 

In that part of the report dealing with Items of Particular Sig- 
nificance we make reference to this department. We, therefore, give 
here without comment statement from Secretary J. C. Canipe of 
activities in his department during the past year: 

I have been your humble servant now for just one year. I have 
been feeling my way and trying to blaze new trails. My efforts 



of North Carolina 113 

have been in two directions; in evangelism and in teaching 
preachers. In the field of evangelism here are some of my 
efforts : 

Conducted 15 revivals in individual churches. 

Directed three Association-wide Simultaneous Revivals in which 
50 churches participated. 

One tent mass meeting which resulted in the establishment of a 
new church. 

Three city-wide campaigns. 

Spoke on evangelism to 18 Pastors' Conferences. 

Held one state-wide conference on evangelism. 

Presented evangelism to three Sunday School Associational Meet- 
ings, and to three Training Union Associational Meetings. 

Represented our organized work at eight district associations. 

Preached in one week Stewardship Revival. 

Spoke to four Woman's Missionary Society meetings. 

Spoke to one Brotherhood meeting. 

In the second phase of the work, that of teaching preachers, I have : 

Conducted two six weeks schools for ministers at Fruitland with 
a total of 130 pastors enrolled. 

Conducted one three weeks school in the city of Greensboro with 
a total of 30 pastors attending. 

Conducted two one-week schools with a total of 60 pastors 
attending. 

In addition I supplied 12 Sundays in pastors' pulpits, reviewed 
three books for the Sunday School Board, and wrote 2,000 letters 
in the interest of our cooperative work. 

5. Department of Visual Education, Radio, and Publicity 

103. Fon H. Scofield, Jr., Secretary 

1. General: 

This department began working July 1, 1946, and its inception 
was greeted with widespread interests and the full cooperation of 
all other convention activities and of the churches. 

The secretary's limited experience in radio and publicity naturally 
turned him more toward the more familiar field of audio-visual aids 
in the church program. The churches wanted guidance in selecting 
and using effectively the resources available. The Department has 
tried to meet this need. The work to date in the audio- visual field 
has been primarily 1) Promotional and 2) Experimental. 

2. Promotional: 

The widespread interest led to 52 demonstrations in local churches 
and to classes and conferences conducted in three assembly weeks at 
Ridgecrest, three weeks at Fruitland, and in 14 conferences of from 
one to two days each at other meetings attended by representatives 
of two or more churches. 



114 Baptist State Convention 

At least 200 churches have access to 16 mm. sound equipment and 
there are approximately 300 slide projectors in our churches. 

The intensive promotional activity has resulted in most of the 
churches purchasing adequate equipment and it cannot be too 
strongly urged that churches seek the cooperation of the department 
before making purchases. 

3. Experimental: 

The department has experimented along several lines in an effort 
to find the basic equipment necessary for effective use in the 
churches as well as to determine the best method of visualizing our 
own Convention activities. The results of this are now conclusive : 

(1) The development of a combination record player and slide- 
strip projector within a price range every church can afford has 
turned our efforts at production to slides and strips. 

(2) The slide has come to be recognized as the most desirable 
method of visualizing a message. Professionally produced materials 
of a high quality are abundant. The materials are easily used by 
inexperienced workers. Slides can be produced economically by our 
own program. 

(3) Recordings of the messages the slides illustrate have been 
favorably received and because they are economically produced 
seem to merit our primary attention. 

4. Future Activities: 

(1) The churches need help in choosing materials that can be 
correlated with our established program. 

(2) Special programs are needed by the churches for use in 
assembly worship, evening worship, and for specialized teaching. 

(3) Visualized programs illustrating every phase of our program 
as a Convention must be prepared along with visualization of 
methods used in our organizations. 

(4) An extensive library of slides and recordings for rental is 
needed. 

Nearly 300 kodachrome slides have already been made by the 
Secretary in attempting to meet these needs. By January 1, 1948, 
three programs visualizing our State Mission Program, The Baptist 
Hospital, and our Summer Assemblies will be ready for distribution. 
By mid-summer of 1948 our entire Convention Program will be 
visualized. 

These needs for the future dictate an intensive program of 
creative work. The Department hopes to place the emphasis at this 
point rather than on promotion for 1948. 

5. Cooperation: 

The Baptist Book Stores are working in close cooperation with 
the Department. Miss Bertha White, Visual Aid Worker, employed 
by the Book Stores, works in the Department office in Wake Forest. 

The Department cooperates with the Visual Education Service of 
the Sunday School Board and the Radio Commission of the South- 



of North Carolina 115 

ern Baptist Convention making the resources of all our work more 
readily available to our churches. 

6. Class Work at Wake Forest College: 

The Secretary conducts a class in Wake Forest College for Educa- 
tional Directors and Ministerial Students for which four hours of 
credit are given. Forty-two students were enrolled in 1946-47. Forty- 
six students are enrolled at this time. An office in the Religion 
Building is furnished to the Secretary in return for the teaching 
services. 

7. Radio: 

Most of the radio stations in the State have been contacted by the 
Department and with the cooperation of local pastors extensive use 
has been made of transcriptions furnished by the Radio Commission. 

The Department appreciates the work of the Radio Advisory 
Committee and looks forward ultimately to the establishment of a 
Convention transcription service and one or more broadcasting sta- 
tions. The tremendous expense involved in these undertakings make 
it unwise to proceed in these projects this year. 

This phase of our work has been greatly handicapped by the 
death of Dr. Carl Townsend, long a leader in this field. The work of 
Rev. Winston Pearce, Chairman, and the Advisory Committee has 
set an ambitious program before the Convention and the Department 
pledges full support in carrying out the will of the Convention. 

8. Public Relations: 

The Department has sought to furnish adequate news coverage for 
Convention activities. The various departments of our work furnish 
basic information from time to time and news articles are prepared. 
Most meetings of the Convention and its Boards have been reported. 
A full-time worker is needed in this field if we are to have an ade- 
quate news service. 

The cooperation of Dr. L. L. Carpenter and the Staff of the 
Biblical Recorder, the support of the Publicity Committee, and the 
many courtesies extended by the newspapers of the State are sin- 
cerely appreciated. 

9. State Missions: 

During the year the Secretary has preached in fifteen churches 
and taken part in two Pastors' Schools, three Schools of Missions, 
and three District Associations, along with eight visualized programs 
in local churches emphasizing State Mission activities. 

The Secretary has worked in two conferences out of the State 
conducted by the Sunday School Board and in two conducted by the 
Virginia Convention. 

104. 6. Work Among the Indians 

Working with the Indians in Robeson County we have the Rev. 
and Mrs. P. A. Underwood. Below we give their own report of the 
work in the Burnt Swamp Association for the past year. 



116 Baptist State Convention 

We are glad to report continued progress in our twenty-six 
churches during the past year. Some of the following results may 
be noted : Three churches have been erected and five or more others 
have been repaired or painted. Twenty-two Bible schools were 
held and at least one or more training schools were held in twenty- 
three of our churches. About seven hundred awards were given in 
Study-course activities. One of the highlights in W.M.U. activities 
is the Annual Young Peoples' Rally Day in June. Representatives 
from the various churches play an important part in making the 
program most enjoyable. The R.A. and G.A. camps were also notable 
in reaching over seventy of our young people from many of our 
churches. Altogether, in all of our activities for young people, we 
would say that over a thousand lives were touched and about three 
hundred conversions and consecrations were effected. We feel 
grateful for these good results. 

For five years and three months, we have labored on this field. 
It is truly a white field unto the harvest. We early reached the con- 
clusion that the most effective work here must be done through 
trained native workers. We have devoted much of our time in trying 
to bring this about. We have hidden ourselves in order to give 
publicity to others. The people here are quick to learn the art of 
leadership and are jealous in the pursuit of the same. 

We feel that the time is now ripe to turn this work over to two 
trained natives. One of our fine young women, Miss Annie Mae 
Locklear, who a few years ago finished her studies in the Pembroke 
Indian College, was teaching and also active in church activities 
when we came on the field. She often expressed a desire to be 
better prepared to give her full time to religious work. We made 
application for her to enter the Training School at Louisville, Ky. 
She was admitted and finished her course there last May. She came 
home with a burning desire to help her people. 

About seven years ago, one of our young men, Rev. Harvey Brew- 
ington, finished his college course here, also. He soon left to enter 
the Seminary at Fort Worth, Texas. He finished his three years' 
course, married a training school girl (native Texan), and held a 
Pastorate in Texas. He was called to a church in California and 
served there nearly three years. Then the conviction came to him 
that he must come back and work with his native people. So the 
Lord has placed two native workers in our midst and they must be 
used according to his bidding. Arrangements are being made with 
Mr. Huggins to place these as Associational Workers. 

Your humble servants have been asked to stay on the field and 
take over the Orphanage situation which is in a sad state and much 
neglected as to filling its mission of service. We realize its difficul- 
ties in its present set-up, but have purposed to see if a better situa- 
tion can be worked out to establish an orphans home for the Indian 
children of this great section. Pray for us in our work. 



of North Carolina 117 

7. Cooperative Work with the General Baptist 
105. State Convention 

The Board continues with great interest the appropriation of 
$2,400.00 a year to aid this convention. We record with enthusiasm a 
fine spirit of cooperation. We would be happy if it were possible to 
increase the appropriation for this work in order to help them pro- 
vide more adequate training, particularly for their ministers who 
are in service, similar to the work we are now doing at Fruitland. 
From the Rev. Thomas Kilgore, Executive Secretary, we have the 
following summary of the work for the year ending September 30, 
1947: 

These two and a half years, which I have spent with the Baptist 
State Convention, have been years of hard work and real pleasure 
and I feel that some progress has been made. The fine relationship 
which has existed between our convention and the Baptist State 
Convention has been a source of inspiration in carrying on our 
work. It is my hope that this relationship will continue to grow. 

The report which I am submitting covers my work. Rev. J. W. 
White will send a report for our Department of Christian Education 
and Training. 

My report is divided in two parts: Part "A" gives a report of 
services rendered; and, part "B" is a statistical summary. 

"A" Sermons preached 78 

Lectures delivered 48 

Ministers visited 59 

Special Missionary Projects promoted 10 

Number of churches supporting work for first time 30 

Miles traveled 26,760 

Amount spent traveling $514.55 

Amount spent for meals $ 23.14 

Number of letters sent out 9,633 

Number of Conferences held with Staff members.... 20 

Letters mailed .... 3,710 

Phone Calls and Telegrams 37 

Miles traveled 47,735 

Churches visited 205 

Approximate Attendance 58,152 

S. S. and B.T.U. Training Conferences 90 

Daily Vacation Bible Schools conducted 40 

Training Conference enrollment 4,539 

Daily Vacation Bible School enrollment 2,206 

Sermons and Addresses delivered 298 

Conversions 72 

Cost of Travel $1,515.40 

Associations reached through Training Courses 44 

Baptist Training Unions Organized 40 



118 Baptist State Convention 

This report includes work done by the following persons: Rever- 
ends L. C. Riddick and O. L. Sherrill, directors, Department of 
Christian Education; Reverend J. W. White, B.T.U. Director; and, 
Mrs. L. D. Edwards, Director of Vacation Bible Schools. 
Amount of money raised: 

Shaw University $25,767.87 

Foreign Missions 20,937.57 

Oxford Orphanage 2,920.53 

State Missions 38,040.95 

"50 Thousand" Club 9,831.71 

' B" Number of Associations in N. C 55 

Number of Associations contributing : 52 

Number of Churches in contributing Associations.... 1,700 

Number of Churches contributing 913 

Number of Oraginzations contributing: 

Conventions, Unions, etc 71 

In behalf of the General Baptist State Convention, I wish to express 
my sincere thanks for the opportunity of having worked in harmony 
with the Baptist State Convention for the past two and a half 
years. As I go to my new field of labor it is my prayer that this fine 
relationship will, grow stronger and stronger. 

8. A Brief Report on the Work at Samarcand 
106. Zeb A. Caudle 

I began my ministry at Samarcand the first of January this year, 
1947, and I feel that I am privileged in this connection to render 
one of the most fruitful ministries of my entire experience. The 
girls there are most appreciative and responsive; gladly taking 
advantage of the opportunities you are offering them through our 
State Mission Board. The superintendent, Miss Reva Mitchell, and 
the other members of the faculty, cooperate in a beautiful way to 
make our ministry count for the most possible good. 

In addition to leading in a worship service once each month, I go 
to the Institution on other occasions, such as Commencement, chapel 
services held, in cooperation with Mrs. C. W. Dover, who is in 
charge of religious activities, personal interviews with the girls 
in an effort to guide and help them to adjust their lives to Christ 
as Saviour and Lord of the whole life. 

It has been my very happy privilege to Baptize thirty of these 
girls during the nine months of my service with them, and we are 
carrying on our Church roll at the Aberdeen Baptist Church the 
names of forty of them as affiliate members. It is our plan, when 
one of these girls, whose name we carry as an affiliate member, is" 
discharged from the Institution, to write the pastor in the commu- 
nity to which she goes so that he may follow up our work and 
seek to enlist her in the life of the church, and thereby enabling 
her to become a useful Christian citizen. 

It is my feeling that this is real mission work, and I rejoice in the 
cooperative effort of our Baptist Household in making this ministry, 



of North Carolina 119 

which we are rendering together, possible. Keep these girls in your 
prayers and those of us who have the privilege to minister there in 
His name. 

9. Sunday School and Vacation Bible School 
Division 
107. L. L. Morgan, Secretary 

With a deep sense of gratitude to the Father who gives all good 
things, we submit the twelfth annual report of your present secre- 
tary. 

PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Myra S. Motley is now in her fourth year as Associate in our 
Division. She leads in promoting Vacation Bible School work and 
assists in compiling the statistical information for the Convention 
Annual. She also does general Sunday school work as her time 
permits. Miss Gaynelle Sparks is now in her third year as office 
secretary. Aside from her stenographic duties she is responsible for 
answering all requests for free literature and applications for awards. 
Both of these are rendering excellent service. Our Approved Work- 
ers, Miss May Bomar; Mrs. C. R. Hinton; Mrs. C. D. Bain; Mrs. F. A. 
Bower; Mrs. C. E. Baucom; and Mrs. L. L. Carpenter, have given 
their best service in our Bible Teaching Clinics and Enlargement 
Campaigns. Mrs. E. W. Holmes and Mrs. G. Van Stephens have served 
on the faculty for several clinics. 

For our Associational-wide Enlargement Campaigns during the 
summer, we had the help of the following twenty-three school teach- 
ers and Seminary, Training School, and College Students: Beth 
Jones, North Wilkesboro; Evelyn Stewart, Hamilton; Norman Ferrell, 
Durham; Hazel Grady, Morganton; Lillian Grant, Spartanburg; 
Betty Faye Trotter, Chattanooga, Tennessee; Marjorie Wilson, Rural 
Hall; Nell Collins, Clyde; Doris Morgan, Lillington; Sarah Padgett, 
Charlotte; Jean Todd, Vidalia, Georgia; Jarvis Adams, Asheville; 
Pearl York, Staley; Elwood Orr, Rocky Mount; Polly Anna Gibbs, 
Mill Springs; Mr. and Mrs. Rex Campbell, Wake Forest; Mary Cope- 
land, Charlottesville, Virginia; Irene Olive, Southern Pines; Myrtle 
Whitaker, Lattimore; Alma Pierce, Hallsboro; Peggy Nichols, North 
Wilkesboro; and Jean Walker, Winston-Salem. We are grateful to all 
of these for their splendid service and fine spirit. 

Achievements 
1. Associational Work 

All of the seventy associations are organized for Sunday school 
work with at least a superintendent. Fifty of them have almost com- 
plete organizations. At our Associational Officers' Training Confer- 
ences in Morganton and Raleigh, December 2 and 3, 1946, forty-four 
associations were represented with more than two hundred in 
attendance. Forty-five associations reported meetings held in co- 
operation with Southwide Associational Sunday School Day. The, 
reports show that 6,597 people attended from 935 churches. 



120 Baptist State Convention 

Mr. G. W. Bullard was transferred from our Division the first of 
the year to become Superintendent of Associational Missons. He 
did an excellent job in developing our associational work and we 
regretted to lose him from the Sunday School Division. 

2. Enlargement Campaigns 

The results of our Enlargement Campaigns will be found on 
page 122. We have worked in six Associational-wide Campaigns and 
have reached one hundred and twenty-one churches. 

3. Bible Teaching Clinics 

In February we had our State-wide Bible Teaching Clinic at the 
First Baptist Church, High Point, when we invited one hundred 
Sunday school leaders to come from over the State to study with 
us for a week. The High Point churches entertained the visiting 
friends in their homes and the Sunday School Board joined our 
Division in furnishing meals to all who came. Words of apprecia- 
tion expressed by those who attended the Clinic have been gratify- 
ing. In addition to the High Point Clinic which was open for all the 
churches in the Piedmont Association, we have held five other 
Association-wide clinics. They were held at the following places: 
Wingate for the Union Association; Forest City for the Sandy Run 
and Green River associations; First Baptist Church, Morganton, for 
the Catawba River Association; First Baptist Church, North Wilkes- 
boro, for the Brushy Mountain Association; and one will be held 
within the next few days at the First Baptist Church, Hickory, for 
the South Fork Association. 

4. Officer and Teacher Training 

From October 1, 1946, to October 1, 1947, there were 13,316 
awards issued in North Carolina. This is a gain of 868 over last year. 
We would like to urge every church to plan for at least one week of 
training during 1948. 

5. Convention and Assembly 

1. Our State Convention was held in Charlotte, April 1, 2, and 3, 
with splendid results. Dr. Harold W. Tribble, Mr. J. L. Corzine, Dr. 
H. L. Grice, Mr. M. A. Huggins, Dr. C. C. Warren, Mr. J. N. Barnette, 
and Mr. W. A. Harrell were on the program. That within itself says 
we had a good Convention. 

2. August 4-9 we had our first Sunday School Assembly at Fruit- 
land. For our program personalities we had Dr. Sankey Blanton, 
Mr. J. L. Corzine, Mr. Claude Gaddy, Mrs. Davis Cooper, and Mr. 
Fon Scofield. The program was one of the best, the food was fine, 
and the climate was perfect. We are going back August 2-8, 1948. 

Meetings for Sunday School Year 
October 1, 1947-October 1, 1948 

(1) Associational Officers' one-day Training Conference, First Bap- 
tist Church, Morganton, October 6, 1947, and First Baptist 
Church, Raleigh, October 7, 1947. 



of North Carolina 121 

(2) The first two weeks in February have been designated as the 
time for each Associational organization to plan to visit every 
church to acquaint the officers and teachers with the 1948 Sun- 
day School program. 

(3) March 2 has been selected as the date for every Association in 
the State to have an inspirational meeting and reports of the 
visits in the churches. This will be promoted under the leader- 
ship of the Associational officers. 

(4) Instead of having our Sunday School Convention in 1948, we 
will have two Assemblies — one at Fort Fisher during the week 
of May 31-June 5, and one at Fruitland, August 2-7. 

(5) The two weeks, June 24-30 and July 1-7, are for the South-wide 
Sunday School conferences at Ridgecrest. A conference for pas- 
tors, educational directors, superintendents, and associational 
officers will be held August 12-18. 

Our Goals 

1. Teacher training courses in 1,600 churches. 

2. Sixteen thousand training awards. 

3. Six association-wide enlargement campaigns. 

4. Six Better Bible Teaching Clinics. 

5. One state-wide administration clinic. 

6. A one-day conference in every association in North Carolina, 
March 2. 

7. One hundred and fifty Standard Sunday Schools. 

8. Special emphasis upon denominational days in the Sunday 
schools. 

9. Five per cent increase in Sunday School enrollment. 

10. Emphases upon teaching for Christian living. 

11. Two thousand Vacation Bible Schools. 

12. Every association organized for Sunday school work. 

13. Six hundred in attendance at our Fort Fisher Assembly, May 31- 
June 5. 

14. Four hundred at Fruitland August 2-8. 

15. Six hundred in attendance at Ridgecrest, July 24-30, June 1-7, 
and August 12-18. 

Appreciation 

We express our deep appreciation to Dr. T. L. Holcomb and the 
Sunday School Board for financial assistance; to Mr. J. N. Barnette 
and his staff for help with our Convention, Enlargement Campaigns, 
and Bible Teaching Clinics; to Dr. Grice and his associates for 
financial aid and promotion assistance in our Vacation Bible School 
work; to Mr. M. A. Huggins for his sympathetic leadership; to the 
other Division heads and their associates for the assistance they have 
rendered during the year; to pastors, associational missionaries, and 
educational directors who have served with us in numerous ways. 



122 



Baptist State Convention 



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of North Carolina 123 

Vacation Bible School Report 
108. Mrs. Myra S. Motley, Associate 

The interest in Vacation Bible School work in North Carolina is 
gratifying. There has been a marvelous growth in the number of 
schools in the four years. Pastors, educational directors, associational 
missionaries, and local leaders are making the Vacation Bible School 
a permanent unit in their educational program. We long to see the 
day when every church in North Carolina has a Vacation Bible 
School every year. Every church in the Johnston, Little River, and 
Rowan associations held a school in 1947. We congratulate the 
leaders!! 

The statistics below show the results in this work for the year: 

1. Number Associations reporting schools 69 

2. Schools reported to date (October 24) 1,552 

3. Enrollment in Schools. .....112,416 

4. Conversions reported 2,695 

5. Schools giving to missions 1,209 

6. Total mission offerings $17,178.05 

7. Number mission schools 33 

8. Number Negro Schools (sponsored by State 
Board and churches) 30 

9. Number ten-day schools 319 

10. Number Standard Schools (making 1,000 points) 9 

11. Grade "A" Schools... 70 

12. Schools with enrollment 200 or more... 46 

We compare our record for 1943 to show the increase that has 
been made in this work: 

1943 1947 

Number Schools ..... 670 1,552 

Enrollment 52,481 112,416 

Conversions reported 1,034 2,695 

Schools giving to Missions.. 477 1,209 

Mission Offerings $4,722 $17,178.05 

The increase in the number of Schools, we feel, comes as a result 
of the Clinics that were held preceding the Vacation Bible School 
season. A State-wide Clinic under the leadership of Mr. Sibley 
Burnett of Nashville and our Sunday School Division was held in 
Roxboro, March 3, 4, and 5, 1947. Approximately 35 Associational- 
wide clinics were held under the leadership of Associational Mis- 
sionaries and Vacation Bible School Superintendents. Another State- 
wide Vacation Bible School Clinic has been scheduled for March 
23-25, 1948. We hope to have a Vacation Bible School leader from 
every Association present. 



124 Baptist State Convention 

We express our appreciation to the following who served all sum- 
mer as Vacation Bible School workers in different Associations: 

Minnie Haire, Fleetwood; Dorothy Walker, Clyde; Rebecca Ward, 
Leaksville; Mrs. G. F. Ireland, Union Grove; Gloria Abernathy, 
Granite Falls; Betty Hefner, Greer, South Carolina; Betsy Ann 
Morgan, Benson; Minda Kennedy, Louisburg; Neva Harper, Rocky 
Mount; Jewell Jarrett, Marshall; Ivadell Thomasson, Spray; Rita 
Britt, Durham; Pauline Wilder, Morrisville; Essie Matheny, Morris- 
ville; Ann Williams, Savannah, Georgia; Doris Greene, West End; 
Annie Laura Mulkey, Murphy; and Mrs. C. W. Ross, Creedmoor. 

10. Training Union Division 
Harvey T. Gibson, Director 

109. PERSONNEL 

During the past year there have been several additions to the 
State Training Union Department. On May 1 Rev. and Mrs. L. J. 
Newton, Jr., came to us from the Dauphin Way Church in Mobile, 
Alabama, where he was assistant to the pastor. Mr. Newton is 
dividing his time between young people's work and associational 
work. Mrs. Newton is our Approved Story Hour Leader. Miss Ruth 
Miller joined the staff on June 1 after her graduation from 
Meredith College and is Intermediate Leader for the State. Miss 
Marguerite George, a Meredith graduate also, came to assist in the 
office on September 1. She gives half of her time to the Training 
Union Department and the other half to the Sunday School De- 
partment. All of these are well qualified to do the work for which 
they have been secured and we consider ourselves fortunate in 
having them in the department. 

Miss Martha Jane Mitchell is in her second year with the depart- 
ment and is making a fine contribution to the junior work in North 
Carolina. Miss Mary Lou Wall continues as our efficient office sec- 
retary. 

Assisting during the four summer enlargement campaigns were the 
following consecrated and capable young people: Frances Alexan- 
der, Goldsboro; Albert Ambrose, Asheville; Stella Austin, Lenoir; 
Mary Baity, Greensboro; Mary Bargeron, Waynesboro, Georgia; 
Bill Beacham, Raleigh; Earline Harris, Drexel; Louvene Jordan, 
Winston-Salem; Bill Lamb, Elizabeth City; Helen Leppard, Colum- 
bia, South Carolina; Betty Mullinax, Asheville; Janie Nance, Ra- 
leigh; Margaret Parks, Wilmington; Miriam Smith, Lenoir; and 
Ruth Wiggins, Raleigh. 

Achievements in 1947 
Associational-wide Enlargement Campaigns: 

The State Training Union Department promoted associational- 
wide enlargement campaigns in these associations: Gaston, Carolina, 
Transylvania, Green River, Ashe, and Wilmington. 



of North Carolina 



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of North Carolina 129 

Assemblies: 

The North Carolina Training Union Assembly at Ridegcrest, June 
5-11, was attended by 2,000 people. Under the fine preaching of 
Rev. J. A. Neilson and the excellent leadership of conference leaders 
113 young people dedicated themselves to full-time rligious work. 

At the first Assembly at Fruitland approximately 200 were in 
attendance. Rev. James C. Cammack brought a series of inspiring 
messages and a. number of conference leaders assisted. As a result 
there were nine commitments to religious work. 

More than 900 North Carolina people attended the three South- 
wide Assemblies at Ridgecrest and there were 93 commitments to 
religious work. As a result of all the assemblies 3,100 Training 
Union people were reached and a total of 215 commitments to full- 
time religious service was made. 

Central Training Schools: 

Central Training Schools have been conducted in the Catawba 
River Association with twenty churches participating. Thirteen 
classes were provided and the average attendance was 241. In one 
district of the Kings Mountain Association eight churches joined in 
a similar effort with an average attendance of 118 in nine classes. 
Another such school is scheduled for the Bladen Association in 
December. 

Associational Officers' Meeting: 

The two annual Associational Officers Meetings in which we 
planned for the 1947 program of work were held at Durham and 
Morganton on November 8 and 9, 1946, with an attendance of 211 
representing 40 associations. Similar meetings were conducted this 
year in Raleigh and Morganton on November 4 and 5. 

December 6 Mass Meetings: 

Through associational officers we promoted simultaneous Mass 
Meetings in 40 associations. Attendance totaled 7,684 from 572 
churches. Similar meetings are planned for December 8, 1947. 

Regional Conventions: 

In the ten regional conventions that convened during April and 
May the attendance totaled 2,417 from 57 associations. Also in 
attendance were 123 pastors, and 303 churches were represented. 
A highlight of these conventions was the excellent showing of many 
contestants in the five Training Union tournaments. The Hymn 
Festival was especially good. More choirs than ever before partici- 
pated and the quality of the singing had improved wonderfully. 

Study Courses: 

In addition to promoting the work as outlined in the above para- 
graphs our field workers have spoken at associational meetings, con- 
ducted conferences, corresponded with Training Union leaders ovei 



130 Baptist State Convention 

the State, and taught as many study courses in local churches as it 
was humanly possible to do. It has been impossible to answer all the 
requests that have come but we have endeavored to extend help as 
far as time and energy permit. 

Our Program for 1948 

The following fourteen points suggest in part our proposed pro- 
gram for the coming year: 

1. Six associational-wide enlargement campaigns. 

2. Ten central associational training schools. 

3. Two State meetings for associational officers. 

4. Two State Training Union Assemblies. 

5. Ten regional conventions. 

6. One hundred fifty additional churches with Training Unions. 

7. Ten thousand increase in Training Union enrollment. 

8. A functioning associational organization in every association. 

9. Twenty-five thousand study course awards. 

10. Five hundred churches in the crusade to enlist all their mem- 
bers in daily Bible reading and prayer. 

11. One hundred fifty thousand daily Bible readers. 

12. Five hundred Training Unions committed to putting on a cru- 
sade to increase prayer meeting attendance in their churches. 

13. Thirty thousand tithers enlisted by Training Unions. 

14. Ten thousand in attendance at simultaneous associational mass 
meetings on December 6, 1948. 

A Word of Appreciation 

Many loyal and consecrated Baptist leaders have joined hands to 
make this a good year for the Training Union. We are deeply grateful 
and take this opportunity to express our appreciation to the General 
Board for the appropriation of money which makes this work possi- 
ble and to Mr. M. A. Huggins for his wise counsel and direction; to 
Dr. T. L. Holcombe, Dr. J. E. Lamdin, and their associates at the 
Sunday School Board for their interest and help; to the hardwork- 
ing and loyal educational directors, pastors, and associational direc- 
tors and missionaries for promoting the work in their local churches 
and associations; to Rev. J. A. Neilson, Rev. James C. Cammack and 
the scores of conference leaders and speakers who made Ridgecrest 
and Fruitland successful; to Dr. L. L. Carpenter and his staff for 
the use of the Biblical Recorder; to the associates in the State Train- 
ing Union Department for their loyalty and consecration to duty; 
and to the thousands of volunteer workers who carry on the work 
in the local churches and associations. 

We ask that you continue to pray for us and to support the work 
during the years ahead. 



of North Carolina 131 

11. Division of Student Work 
110. James W. Ray, Secretary (Accepted September 1) 
Personnel: 

Miss Edith Arrington, Baptist Student Secretary, Baptist Hospital, 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Miss Gloria Blanton, Baptist Student Secretary, East Carolina 
Teachers College, Greenville, N. C. 

Mr. John Chandler, Part-time Baptist Student Secretary, Duke 
University, Durham, N. C. 

Miss Billie Ruth Currin, Director of Religious Activities, Meredith 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 

Rev. J. C. Herrin, Chaplain of Baptist Students, University of 
North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Rev. Roberts C. Lasater, Chaplain of Baptist Students, N. C. State 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 

Miss Carolyn Moseley, Baptist Student Secretary, Woman's Col- 
lege, Greensboro, N. C. 

Miss Marjorie Toole, Baptist Student Secretary, Appalachian State 
Teachers College, Boone, N. C. 

Rev. Claude White, Baptist Student Secretary, Campbell College, 
Buies Creek, N. C. 

Mrs. Clairene Keith, Office Secretary, Raleigh, N. C. (Accepted 
September 15). 

With the above staff of student workers, and especially on cam- 
puses which have no student secretary, a host of faculty advisers, 
college pastors, and BSU council members serve to give length, 
breadth and depth to the total program of Baptist Student Union in 
the college centers of North Carolina. 

The following is a suggested calendar of events which is spon- 
sored by the Baptist Student Union on a college campus. Modifica- 
tions, adaptations and variations are necessary as local campus 
Unions blend their schedule to reach the students and attain the 
desired results when other campus scheduled events are considered. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

September : 

Pre-school Planning Retreat. 
General B.S.U. Social. 
Church Fellowship Week. 
Join the Church Day. 
Open House at Student Center. 
Enlistment Campaign. 

October : 

Greater B.S.U. Council Meeting. 

The Baptist Student Magazine Campaign. 

Extension Council Organizations. 

Stewardship Campaigns. 

Baptist Student Convention. 



132 Baptist State Convention 

November: 

General B.S.U. Thanksgiving Service. 
Overseas student guests. 

December: 

Student Secretaries' Seminar. Nashville. 
Student Night at Christmas. 

January : 

Enlistment of New Baptist Students. 
Student Life Commitment Day. 
General B.S.U. Fellowship Hour. 

February: 

Baptist World Alliance Sunday. 
Christian Emphasis and Focus Weeks. 

March : 

Summer Service Enlistment Day. 

Mission Emphasis. 

General B.S.U. — Election of Officers. 

April : 

Installation of Officers. 

State B.S.U. Retreat. 

Clinics for Summer Volunteers. 

May : 

S.B.C. Day at College. 
General B.S.U. Banquet. 

June: 

Installation of Summer B.S.U. Council. 
Southwide Baptist Student Retreat, Ridegcrest. 
State Baptist Student Retreat, Fort Fisher Assembly. 

July-August : 

Volunteer Summer Service. 

Southwide and State Assemblies. 

Youth Revivals. 

Statewide Planning Conference, Fruitland Assembly. 

Synopsis of Activities Within the State: The details for this report 
are not sufficient to present a complete over-all picture of the work 
done in the Department for the past year. The fact that there was 
no State Student Secretary from September 1946 to September 1947 
does not mean that no student work was done. The local Campus 
Secretaries did a splendid work in their particular situations. But 
the office records for this period, and the information at hand, are 
lacking. 

There were five or six effective Religious Emphasis weeks con- 
ducted in as many schools and colleges. 

Student Secretaries Conference in Nashville was attended by all 
the student secretaries in the employee of the Department in 
December 1946. 



of North Carolina 133 

New Student Secretaries: Miss Edith Arrington came to the School 
of Nursing, at the Baptist Hospital early in the Spring and is doing 
an excellent work. Miss Gloria Blanton assumed her duties at East 
Carolina Teachers College during the past summer in time to lay the 
foundation and effect an organization for a constructive program. 
Mr. John Chandler, part-time Student Worker and Divinity Student, 
is doing highly acceptable work in a peculiar situation with the 
Baptist Students at Duke University. Miss Carolyn Moseley began 
work in September at Woman's College, Greensboro, and, in spite 
of a fire which greatly damaged the Student Center, is fitting well 
into the work for which she has wide preparation. Miss Marjorie 
Toole is welcomed back into the family of Student workers at 
Appalachian State Teachers College after two years' absence from 
that post. Rev. Claude White entered the work with the fall session 
at Campbell College where there had not been a full-time secretary 
previously. Mrs. Clairene Keith was employed as Office Secretary, 
early in October to succeed Mrs. Mildred Stuart who has gone to the 
Department of Associational Missions. The position of Student 
Secretary at Wake Forest was filled in the month of August, but 
after a serious surgical operation which made it impossible for him 
to serve in this capacity, Rev. Robert Greene tendered his resig- 
nation. 

Including the State Secretary, eight new workers have come to the 
Student Department since mid-year 1947, bringing the number of 
the staff to 11 members. Along with this new blood in the veins of 
Baptist Student Union comes a new dedication to the opportunities 
and responsibilities it faces. 

Spring Retreat was held on April 25-26 at the First Baptist Church, 
Raleigh. In attendance were the members of the newly elected B.S.U. 
Councils from the several schools and colleges over the State. In 
addition to a well planned and effective training program for these 
new officers, the following new State officers were elected: 

President — Don Shropshire (University of North Carolina). 
Enlistment Vice President — Miss Betsy Bullock, Woman's College. 
Social Vice President — Miss Louvene Jordan, Meredith College. 
Devotional Vice President — Warren Turner, Campbell College. 
Secretary-Treasurer — George Skipworth, Duke University. 
Publicity Director — Leonard Morgan, Jr., State College. 
Literature Chairman — Helen Rich, E.C.T.C. 
Music Chairman — Tommy Stapleton, Wake Forest College. 

Southwide Student Retreat at Ridgecrest. Attendance at this retreat 
last June approached 3,000 with a fellowship and a program marked 
by sincerity and fervor. North Carolina's student quota was limited 
to about 200 delegates, and other states proportionally. Students 
returned from Ridgecrest to their summer's work fortified for effec- 
tive service and equipped, inspired and determined to win victories 
on their campuses this fall. 



134 Baptist State Convention 

Students in Summer Work. Although the B.S.U. did not sponsor 
youth teams for Revivals during the past summer, one hundred and 
four Baptist Students were used for special work by the combined 
agencies of the State Mission Board. Many of these who were college 
graduates have already been employed by local churches as a mem- 
ber of the staff. This does not, of course, include the hundreds of 
college students who rendered invaluable assistance in conducting 
Vacation Bible Schools in their own churches under the direction of 
the local pastors. 

State Planning Conference. The anticipated joint meeting with the 
corps of workers from South Carolina could not be scheduled, but 
25 secretaries and Council Presidents met for four days at the New 
Baptist Assembly at Fruitland, near Hendersonville, N. C. This was 
the first contact made by the new State secretary with the students 
and secretaries of the State. Plans were laid for the opening of the 
fall term of colleges and for the Annual State Student Convention 
in October. North Carolina students will look forward with great 
enthusiasm for another such meeting at Fruitland. 

Preschool Retreats were held by some 15 B.S.U. Councils. These 
were all well attended by the members of the councils and detailed 
considerations were made of the year's program. The State secretary 
visited with seven of the councils in retreat. 

State Secretary's Survey. Since coming to the Department, Mr. 
Ray has visited the following campuses for speaking engagements 
and to survey the work and needs prevailing : East Carolina Teach- 
ers College, Appalachian State Teachers College, Pembroke College, 
Flora Macdonald College, Duke University, Wake Forest College, 
Gardner-Webb College, Woman's College, Meredith College, Cataw- 
ba College, A. & T. College, Shaw University, Elon College, and 
State College. Generally speaking, and in several manifest situa- 
tions, there is a deep concern and a vital sincerity among the stu- 
dents for the work of Baptist Student Union. New B.S.U. Councils 
have been organized at Flora Macdonald and A. & T. Colleges. 
Miss Jennie Lind Gatlin from the Nashville office will be in North 
Carolina during November to assist in concerted weeks to strengthen 
the work on some campuses and to help organize others. 

The Fall Convention of B.S.U. The host church for the Annual 
Convention, October 31-November 2, is the First Baptist Church, 
High Point. The theme is "The Christian Response to a World 
Challenge." A debt of gratitude is due to Rev. Roberts C. Lasater, 
Chaplain of Baptist Students, State College, for his untiring efforts 
in securing personalities for the program. Don Shropshire, State 
President, will preside at the State Convention. 

A Personal Word. 

As I come to the work as Secretary of the Department of Baptist 
Student Union in North Carolina, I wish to express my deep appre- 
ciation for the many notes of welcome, both verbal and written, 
from the associates in the convention family, the pastors of North 



of North Carolina 135 

Carolina, the students, secretaries in other states, and the Nash- 
ville Office. It was with reluctance that I left a happy pastorate to 
come to a work that has held my interest and contributed so very 
much to my own life since student days. From the beginning I 
pledge to the Baptist State Convention my consistant loyalty; to the 
Baptist College Administrations my whole-hearted cooperation; to 
the students my very best in wisdom and understanding, leadership 
and counselling; and to the pastors of this great State my constant 
awareness of the fact that Baptist Student Union is a continuation 
of the work and influence which the local church initiates and nur- 
tures in youth. We covet the continuation of prayer, sympathy and 
support and we purpose in return to effect such a program as is 
necessary to give spiritual development not only to those sur- 
rendered to full-time religious endeavors but to the laity of college 
youth upon whom, at a later date, the local church must depend for 
strength and support in matters of intellectual wisdom and spiritual 
zeal. 



136 



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of North Carolina 137 

V. COUNCIL ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

111. C. Sylvester Green, Chairman 

The Council on Christian Education presents a brief report on its 
activities since the last meeting of the Baptist State Convention. 

In addition to the four regular quarterly meetings, numerous 
special committee meetings have been held this year. Following the 
policy of past years the work of the Council has been done through 
the activities of its four committees, each consisting of a chairman 
and eleven members. These committees, with their chairmen, are as 
follows: Finance, R. S. Dickson; Correlation, W. Perry Crouch; 
Christian Emphasis, R. A. Ellis; and Church-School Relations, Dr. 
L. M. Massey. The Executive Committee is composed of the general 
chairman of the Council, the vice chairman, Mrs. J. S. Farmer, and 
the secretary, Miss Addie Mae Cooke, with the chairmen of the 
four committees. 

By action of the Baptist State Convention in meeting in Asheville 
last year, the Council membership was increased by four members 
in the re-organization of the General Board, providing sixteen mem- 
bers on the Committee on Education. At the present time there are 
fifty-two members of the Council with the following representa- 
tions: Twenty-four members from the six colleges, each having a 
representation of four members in its president, dean, president of 
the Board of Trustees, and chairman of the Executive Committee; 
in addition to these twenty-four coming directly from the colleges, 
there are sixteen members from the Education Committee of the 
General Board, eight members at large named by the Baptist State 
Convention for terms of four years, two being named at each session 
of the Convention; added to this membership of forty-eight are four 
ex officio members, consisting of the President of the Baptist State 
Convention, the General Secretary of the Convention, the President 
of the W.M.U., and the President of the General Board. 

Individual Colleges 

In view of the fact that each of the colleges makes a separate 
report to the Convention, the Council on Christian Education here- 
with presents only brief comments on each of the colleges. 

Gardner-Webb Junior College. By action of the Baptist State 
Convention meeting in Asheville last November, Gardner-Webb 
Junior College was admitted to the educational system of the Bap- 
tist State Convention and continues to make excellent progress 
toward meeting all the requirements for an outstanding program 
of work. In addition to completing one new dormitory for young 
men, contracts have been awarded for two others and a new athletic 
field has been made available. It is interesting to note that in addi- 
tion to providing a cash building fund of almost $400,000, the 
college had on hand as of July 31, 1947, almost $100,000 in endow- 
ment funds. The Council held its October meeting at Gardner-Webb 



138 Baptist State Convention 

College and is happy to report marked progress along all lines in the 
work of this our newest junior college. 

Mars Hill Junior College. In its regular meeting in July the 
Council on Christian Education had an opportunity to visit Mars 
Hill Junior College and observe the growth and progress which 
continues to be made. Not only has the new dormitory, providing 
facilities for 120 young women, been completed and occupied, but 
the new and commodious dining room is under construction and 
will be one of the best among our colleges. With an enrollment of 
approximately 1,000 students, Mars Hill continues to challenge the 
best in junior college work. 

Wingate Junior College. In addition to its regular program with a 
maximum enrollment of students, the chief activity at Wingate 
through the past year has been the construction of a new dormitory 
for young men and the beautiful new library building, both of which 
are now nearing completion. Although the smallest of the junior 
colleges, Wingate has demonstrated its determination to go forward 
and maintain an enviable position among our Baptist schools. 

Campbell Junior College. In keeping with the progress made i 
the three other junior colleges, Campbell College rejoices in the 
completion of its new dormitory for young men, and makes provi- 
sion for its largest enrollment with the greatest variety of living 
accommodations to be found on any of our college campuses. 

Meredith College. Of the six Baptist colleges, Meredith has found 
itself in the present emergency in the most fortunate position of 
having adequate dormitory facilities for its students. Due to the 
building restrictions which have been in effect until recently, Mere- 
dith College has not been able to launch its great building program 
for an auditorium and classrooms, and other needed facilities, but 
its trustees find encouragement in the hope that in the near future 
reduced building costs will make it possible to get even greater 
returns as they invest their plant funds of more than $400,000 now 
available. 

Chowan College. The Council has nothing to report with respect 
to Chowan College and the properties which continue unused. The 
Trustees of the college have held numerous meetings and had under 
consideration various proposals from time to time throughout the 
year, but nothing definite has materialized. 

Wake Forest College. Matters pertaining to Wake Forest College 
continue to claim the attention of North Carolina Baptists in general 
and the Council on Christian Education in particular. This would 
be true under normal conditions, but with the relocation of the 
college and all its attendant considerations to claim our attention we 
face many challenging opportunities and issues. With the action of 
the last Baptist State Convention in authorizing a special effort to 
raise one and a half million dollars within the next three years 
through the churches, the Council on Christian Education has co- 



of North Carolina 139 

operated in every way possible to insure the success of this under- 
taking. Early in the year, by unanimous action, the Council adopted 
the following three-point statement for its general guidance through 
the year: 

"1. The action of the Baptist State Convention in accepting the 
proposal to move Wake Forest College to Winston-Salem constitutes 
a challenge of first importance, and the Council on Christian Educa- 
tion pledges its full support for whatever efforts are deemed neces- 
sary to accomplish this purpose. In the realization of this purpose 
the members of the Council recognize the greatest contribution pos- 
sible, not only for Wake Forest College but for the cause of Chris- 
tian education in general; and it is the belief of the Council that this 
can be achieved without harm or hindrance to any one or all of our 
Baptist colleges. In addition to the good that will come to Wake 
Forest College, there will come benefits to all other colleges, pro- 
vided all our efforts and purposes are properly understood and 
related. 

"2. In recognizing the above primary responsibility at this par- 
ticular time, the Council is keenly aware of its obligation to aid each 
and all Baptist colleges to render their continuing maximum service. 
To accomplish this, each college has the specific duty of developing 
and utilizing its own resources in every way possible. The Council 
heartily approves and encourages each and all of the colleges to 
proceed with expansion programs and improved facilities to what- 
ever extent and in whatever respects the trustees deem advisable and 
possible, and in conformity with Convention policies. 

"3. With respect to the use of the Wake Forest College property, 
the Council continues in its first expressed wish that "there may be 
devised ways and means by which the present property of the college, 
now located in the town of Wake Forest, shall be continuously used 
for purposes of Christian Education and thereby keep faith with the 
sacred inspiration of the founders and those who have cherished it 
through the years." 

The program of Christian education in our North Carolina Baptist 
colleges is so vitally related to all the questons arising in the 
handling of the relocation of Wake Forest College that every deci- 
sion made should be carefully considered and given our best thought 
and action, and the Council on Christian Education wants to make 
whatever contribution it can in the proper handling of all these 
matters. With the numerous special committees which have been 
named by the Convention for the consideration of matters relating 
to the relocation of Wake Forest College, it is necessary that a 
spirit of cooperation and understanding be maintained in so far as 
possible. The various committees responsible for securing the funds 
expected from North Carolina Baptists and others cannot function 
without affecting the work of all the other colleges, as well as that of 
the committee considering the disposition of the present Wake Forest 
plant. It is well for us to realize that the unparalleled opportunity 



140 Baptist State Convention 

that the relocation of Wake Forest brings to North Carolina Bap- 
tists has within it, if not wisely and properly handled, the possi- 
bility of being a definite hazard to the whole program of Christian 
education, especially as it is related to the matter of financial 
support. 

In periods of inflation, both in the value of the dollar and in the 
availability of students for our colleges, it is not possible for us to 
understand and settle wisely many of our financial policies in rela- 
tion to the operation of our colleges. It is well for us to concern 
ourselves with questions about these Baptist colleges, other than 
financial matters. Deliberate thinking will bring all of us face to 
face with one big question, which is: How long will the Baptists of 
North Carolina be able and willing to provide the ever-increasing 
amount of money that will be necessary if we are to continue to 
have a program of Christian education in our colleges? The fair 
condition of the finances in these colleges today is due to abnormal 
conditions in the economic world and in the number of available 
students, all of whom are able to pay their expenses. Normal condi- 
tions in either respect would completely change this status of our 
colleges. 

Finance 

The Finance Committee met in Raleigh on January 9, 1947, for 
the purpose of considering the allocation of the Cooperative Program 
funds to the various colleges for the year 1947. With representatives 
from all the colleges present, the matter was discussed at length and 
the meeting was concluded by the naming of a special committee to 
give further consideration and bring recommendations to the full 
membership of the Finance Committee at a later date. R. S. Dickson, 
chairman of the Finance Committee, appointed as members of this 
special committee C. Sylvester Green, chairman, with Presidents 
T. D. Kitchin, Carlyle Campbell, L. H. Campbell, Phil Elliott, Hoyt 
Blackwell, and C. C. Burris. 

After considerable study and work the special committee on allo- 
cations brought to the Finance Committee in its meeting on March 
27, 1947, the following report: 

Mr. Rush S. Dickson 

Chairman, Committee on Finance 

Council on Christian Education 

Your special committee composed of the Chairman of the Council 
and the presidents of the six associated colleges, appointed to deter- 
mine a satisfactory allocation of funds available for these colleges, 
presents the following unanimous report: 

The committee held its first meeting at the Hotel Carolina in 
Raleigh on Tuesday, January 21, with all seven members of the 
committee present. (President Burris of Wingate was officially rep- 
resented by the Rev. E. S. Summers.) From one o'clock to 3:55 p.m. 
the committee discussed at length the various proposals for the alio- 



of North Carolina 141 

cation of educational funds available from the Baptist State Con- 
vention, and adjourned only because of the pressure of time. 

The committee reconvened at the Hotel Washington Duke, Dur- 
ham, on Monday, February 3, with all members of the committee 
present. The discussion of several proposals was continued, and on 
motion of President Elliott of Gardner-Webb and second of President 
Kitchin of Wake Forest, the schedule of allocations as shown on 
page 50 was unanimously adopted. 

It was voted that this schedule be submitted to your committee 
and that we ask its formal presentation to the Council on Christian 
Education at its meeting on March 27. The hope is expressed that 
the Council will find it possible to convey the recommendations 
immediately to the Executive Committee of the General Board of 
the Baptist State Convention, it being understood that that com- 
mittee has been given authority to act in this matter. 

It was further voted that October 15 of each year be accepted 
as the date upon which enrollment figures will be verified, and those 
figures used in computations for the succeeding fiscal year of the con- 
vention. 

It was further voted on motion of President Carlyle Campbell of 
Meredith and second of President Burris of Wingate that we further 
recommend to you and through you to the proper authorities that 
the above schedule of allocations be used throughout the year in dis- 
tributing such funds as may at each time of distribution be available, 
expressing the hope that such distributions may be made at least 
once every quarter at a regularly stated time. 

Committee : 

C. Sylvester Green, Chairman, 
Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill College, 
C. C. Burris, Wingate College, 
Carlyle Campbell, Meredith College, 
Leslie H. Campbell, Campbell College, 
Phil Elliott, Gardner-Webb College, 
Thurman D. Kitchin, Wake Forest College. 

Durham, N. C. 

February 3, 1947. 

This report received the approval of the Finance Committee and, 
following unanimous approval of the entire Council and the Execu- 
tive Committee of the General Board, became the basis of allocation 
of Cooperative Program funds for 1947. 

The following brief explanation is made of the various items enter- 
ing into this plan of allocation. 

(1) Enrollment. The enrollment for each college is based on the 
official enrollment as of October 15 of each regular school year. In 
the case of Campbell and Wingate Junior Colleges, the enrollment 
figures are divided into two divisions, the first being college students 
and the second high school. 



142 



Baptist State Convention 



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of North Carolina 143 

(2) Rate. Under the Rate column you will find listed the per 
student allowance for instructional cost. The Council does not 
include costs other than instruction, since it considers this the chief 
responsibility of the Convention to its students, and also because of 
the many variables in other items which are not comparable in the 
different institutions. 

(3) Cost. The figures in this column represent the cost of instruc- 
tion in each college as determined by multiplying the number of 
students by the rate figured. 

(4) Students. The amount listed in this column represents a uni- 
form standard charge for tuition and fees of $200 per student 
in the senior colleges and $125 per student in the junior colleges. 

(5) Balance. This column represents the difference in the esti- 
mated cost and the amount to be paid by the students, and must be 
provided from two other sources — endowment and the Baptist 
State Convention. 

(6) Endowment. The Council has tried to recognize sound policies 
with respect to endowment funds in these colleges. To charge a 
college with its full endowment would kill any incentive to increase 
the endowment and penalize initiative on the part of the college. In 
order to be fair in this respect, the Council has set up an assumed 
schedule of endowments based on requirements by the Southern 
Association of Colleges for accrediting. This schedule would make it 
necessary for each of our six colleges to have the following endow- 
ments: 

Wake Forest $1,900,000 x .05 $95,000 

Meredith 700,000 x .05 35,000 

Mars Hill - 550,000 x .05 27,500 

Wingate - 250,000 x .05 12,500 

Campbell 300,000 x .05 15,000 

Gardner-Webb 300,000 x .05 15,000 

This schedule of endowments, figured on a basis of a 5 per cent 
return, would produce the amounts listed. 

It should be noted that, although a return of 5 per cent on invest- 
ments is too high for present conditions, the results to each college 
would not be affected by using a different percentage. 

(7) Balance. By deducting the income from endowments in col- 
umn (6) from the amounts shown in column (5), we have the 
balance necessary to meet the instructional cost set up in column (3), 
and this balance in column (7) becomes the amount to be pro- 
vided from Cooperative Program funds for Christian Education. 

(8) Column 8 merely shows the amounts that would accrue to 
each college if the available funds are $351,959 instead of the 
$319,964. 



144 Baptist State Convention 

General statements. If the Council had used the actual endowment 
funds which each of the colleges now has, rather than the schedule 
as set up, it would mean no Convention funds for Wake Forest Col- 
lege; $8,000 more for Meredith; $7,500 more for Campbell; $10,000 
more for Gardner-Webb; $22,500 more for Mars Hill; and $12,500 
more for Wingate. At the same time, such a policy would have meant 
diverting endowment funds from Wake Forest College to the other 
colleges, which would be a violation of the purposes on the part of 
those providing the endowments. 

The plan of allocation is complicated and rather difficult of under- 
standing, but the members of the special committee consisting of 
the presidents of the six colleges, with the unanimous approval of 
the whole Council, feel that the plan is sound and provides an 
equitable distribution of the funds available for Christian Education 
to the six Baptist colleges in operation. 

In its meeting on October 9, 1947, the Council on Christian Educa- 
tion, following the suggestion of the Finance Committee, unani- 
mously recommended that this plan of allocation in operation in 
1947 become the basis for the allocation of funds available to the 
colleges in 1948. This recommendation was presented to and ap- 
proved by the General Board in its meeting on October 28, 1947. 

Church-School Relations 

This special committee of the Council, with Dr. L. M. Massey as 
chairman, has been very active in promoting better understanding 
and more wholehearted cooperation between the churches and the 
colleges. One of its first activities of the year was the preparation 
of a folder of general information about all the colleges and the 
School of Nursing in the Baptist Hospital. Copies of this folder were 
mailed to the more than 23,000 seniors in the high schools of North 
Carolina. 

In addition to the folder, through the cooperation of the Biblical 
Recorder special issues and features giving information on our 
colleges and their work have been provided through the year. 

This committee has recognized and considered at length the very 
great need for accurate and helpful information about the colleges 
and their work. In order to utilize the interest of the pastors in the 
work of Christian education and to secure from them the much need- 
ed help which they are capable of giving, a letter has been addressed 
to every pastor in the State asking both his appraisal of what is now 
being done in the colleges and his suggestions for improving them. 
The response on the part of the pastors has been most encouraging, 
and it will be the purpose of the Council to follow this matter closely 
in trying to get as nearly one hundred per cent participation as 
possible. The information gained is being tabulated and will be 
made available to the colleges in such form as to be of most help in 
guiding the administration in trying to meet the needs as represented 
in these colleges. 



of North Carolina 145 



Christian Emphasis 



As the Council has faced its responsibilities in those matters 
pertaining to finance and public relations, it has by no means over- 
looked the importance of what is going on in these colleges. Per- 
haps the most important committee in the Council is this Committee 
on Christian Emphasis, of which the six college presidents are 
members. It is interesting to note that in almost every meeting of 
the Council this year the six college presidents have been present 
and have taken an active part in the consideration of all the matters 
brought to their attention. 

There have been many interesting discussions of the religious 
activities on the various campuses and of ways and means of meeting 
the spiritual needs of the young men and young women enrolled in 
these colleges. Numerous suggestions have been heard and many of 
them incorporated into the policies and practices of the colleges. 
The program of work provided through the Baptist Student Union on 
the college campuses has been discussed at length and, following the 
selection of James W. Ray as Secretary of the Baptist Student Union 
work in the State, a conference was held with the college presidents 
and Secretary Ray with the idea of effecting a close and wholesome 
relationship between the work of his department and the college 
administrations. 

This committee will be interested especially in the comments and 
suggestions of the pastors of the State, and will strive to embody 
in the work of the colleges the highest Christian ideals to be had. 
These college presidents have shown their desire and determination 
to make these institutions Christian colleges and worthy of the sup- 
port of the Baptists of North Carolina. 

Correlation 

The work of this committee, which includes the six deans of the 
colleges, is more technical than that of the other committees and 
cannot be reported in detail. Some of the more important features 
include the consideration of new courses of study and subjects that 
are considered appropriate and needed in our colleges, as well as 
the elimination of different standards for grading and evaluation of 
credits. The committee is giving particular study at this time to the 
relation of the offerings in the junior colleges with the idea of trans- 
ferring credits to the senior colleges, and also in the matter of 
terminal courses that are considered advisable in the junior col- 
leges. The work of this committee is of great importance and the 
quarterly meetings provide a ready means for study and con- 
siderations. 

Under the leadership of this committee during the past year, pro- 
vision has been made for professional and departmental meetings of 
members of the faculties, thereby making it possible for improving 
instruction in all the colleges. 

10 



146 Baptist State Convention 

The most important of these departmental meetings was held at 
Meredith College on November 7-8. In this meeting of more than 
100 college representatives there were, in addition to the adminis- 
trative officers of the six colleges, the departmental heads and repre- 
sentatives of the committee from the Council. 

The first day was given to a discussion of matters pertaining to 
the instructional program in general; the second day was given to 
departmental meetings, with particular problems being discussed. 

This marked the first large meeting of its kind, and perhaps has 
within it the possibility of becoming the most important type of 
work done by the Council on Christian Education. This particular 
group is responsible for the type of instruction that is provided, 
and in its hands rests the responsibility for seeing that the highest 
educational standards are maintained in our six Baptist colleges. 
Chairman W. Perry Crouch and his Correlation Committee gave 
much thought and work to the success of this meeting, and expect 
to follow it with similar gatherings through the coming year. 

General Summary 

The Council on Christian Education in North Carolina is an agency 
that is new in this State and does not have in any other state of the 
Southern Baptist Convention a pattern for its work. In its brief 
period of work, it has tried to function actively without in any man- 
ner hindering or interfering with the normal and proper operation 
of any one or all of the colleges. It has recognized the dangers 
inherent in such an agency, and in trying to prevent interference it 
has moved with caution and in some instances more slowly than 
some considered proper. 

In attempting to provide a coordinating agency for Christian 
education in our colleges, the Council has not hesitated to make its 
service available to all other departments of the Convention, and to 
work in closest cooperation with every activity promoted by the 
Baptists of the State. The activities of the Executive Secretary have 
included participation in the work of committees working on various 
aspects of the educational program, in participating in conferences 
and programs of study conducted by the Sunday School and Train- 
ing Union departments, as well as other phases of the work. For 
approximately three months in the year, August, September, and 
October, the full time of the Secretary is given in attending the 
Associations meeting throughout the State, and in trying to get as 
broad participation in these programs by representatives of the 
colleges as possible. Those who have attended the meetings of the 
Associations this year will testify as to the worthwhileness and the 
effectiveness of the work that has been done by these representa- 
tives of the colleges who have spoken on Christian Education. 



of North Carolina 147 

VI. REPORT FROM THE COLLEGES 

(a) Campbell College 
D. E. Stewart, Chairman of Board of Trustees 
112. L. H. Campbell, President 

The present enrollment for the fall semester stands at 690, an 
increase of 21 per cent over last year's peak registration. During the 
summer 202 students matriculated. The fall enrollment includes 
representatives from 77 counties in this State, 10 states of the 
United States, Cuba, Puerto Rica, Canada, and Chile. 

A further study of student personnel reveals the presence of 269 
veterans this fall. Thirty of the 690 are ministerial students, while 
25 others are volunteers for the mission fields. On the basis of church 
membership there are 448 Missionary Baptists, 80 Methodists, 35 
Presbyterians, 22 Christians, 9 Episcopalians, 4 Catholics, 2 Jews, 
and others, 8. Approximately 80 are not members of any church. 

Among the most noteworthy achievements during the past year 
the following deserve special mention: (1) Faculty salaries have 
been increased approximately 15 per cent over last year on an 
average. (2) The new W. S. Britt dormitory for boys has been made 
ready for occupancy though still not fully finished. (3) Two build- 
ings donated by the federal government have been erected and put 
to good use. One meets adequately a vital need for an infirmary, 
and the other provides valuable classroom space for this emergency. 
(4) The college has converted a large two-story residence, pur- 
chased one year ago, into an apartment house for teachers, equipped 
with modern conveniences. (5) For the first time a full-time director 
of religious activities has been employed this fall. (6) A new 
college-owned athletic field, close to the campus, has been pur- 
chased and made available for use this fall. The spacious play- 
ground will be known as Taylor Field, honoring Herbert B. Taylor, 
father of the widely publicized Knee-Pants Baseball League, in 
recognition of his generous contributions to the college. 

As this Convention meets the trustees and friends of Campbell 
College find the institution faced with a great open door. Certainly 
North Carolina Baptists cannot lose sight of the fact that the 
removal of Wake Forest College into its new field of opportunity 
leaves a broad section of our State, rich in traditions and strong in 
its denominational loyalties, without a Baptist College for men. 
That section, recently described by Dr. Clarence H. Poe as the 
Empire of Eastern North Carolina, certainly should possess at least 
one great, well-equipped Baptist junior college, open to men and 
women. Campbell College, admirably situated in the heart of this 
great agricultural section and richly blessed in its traditions and 
popular attachments, offers to the denomination just the oppor- 
tunity for developing spiritual leadership for this domain. 



148 Baptist State Convention 

(b) Gardner-Webb College 
John W. Suttle, Chairman Board of Trustees 

113. Phil L. Elliott, President 

The fortieth year of Gardner-Webb College, the nineteenth as a 
junior college, is under way. The total registration is 378. Of 
these 257 are men, and 121 women. There are 240 freshmen, 112 
sophomores, and 26 specials. These come from 42 counties in North 
Carolina, six states, and Porto Rico. 342 of the 378 are from North 
Carolina. Of the total 324 are Baptist, and 23 are not members of 
any church. Seventy-one of the group are married and 307 single. 
There are 163 veterans, about 13 per cent less than in 1946-47. 

The choice of profession among the students is varied. The minis- 
try heads the list with 61 preachers and 24 missionaries. Thirty- 
seven other vocations are listed. 

In 1946 Gardner- Webb was admitted into the Baptist family of 
colleges with the understanding that an endowment of $250,000.00 
would be raised by the Convention of 1948. There have been some 
serious interferences not within our control, but the college has 
succeeded in raising to date $121,114.53 on this proposed endow- 
ment. The school is being supported from the cooperative funds 
on the plan agreed upon by the Council on Christian Education. The 
college is operating on its income. 

Gardner-Webb is the youngest of the Baptist Colleges in the 
state. It does not for that reason ask for any special consideration 
or privileges beyond those received by others. Special interest 
and sympathetic understanding sometimes go a long way in crystal- 
lizing an attitude and spirit that will direct for years to come. 
However, Gardner-Webb College enters the Baptist cooperative 
program of education with the idea of forgetting herself into the 
larger effort of elevating all of our people to a higher plane of 
being and of service. 

(c) Mars Hill College 
Grover H. Jones, President of the Board of Trustees 

114. Hoyt Blackwell, President of the College 

The ninety-second session of Mars Hill College began under 
favorable circumstances. The total enrollment for the present 
semester is 1,020, including 985 regular college students and 35 who 
are taking special courses of one kind or another. There are 57 
ministerial students and 68 Volunteers for Christ. Students are regis- 
tered from 87 counties in North Carolina, 18 other states, the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Brazil, and Cuba. Scores of other choice students, 
men and women, would have entered had there been room for them. 
At the Founders' Day exercises on October 11 Huffman Dormitory 
for young women was dedicated and the cornerstone was laid in the 
Coyte Bridges Memorial Dining Hall. These new buildings are mod- 
ern and beautiful in their appointments. 



of North Carolina 149 

During the week of October 12 Dr. J. Glenn Blackburn, pastor of 
the First Baptist Church in Lumberton, assisted Pastor John R. 
Link in a series of revival services. Each service was warm and 
spiritual. Several persons confessed Christ as Saviour and scores of 
others reaffirmed their faith in and loyalty to Christ. The Baptist 
Student Union makes an immeasurable contribution to the spiritual 
tone of the campus from day to day. 

The summer school, now an integral part of the college, con- 
tinues to grow in numbers and in usefulness under the direction of 
Dean R. M. Lee and his loyal faculty and staff. The outlook for next 
summer is pleasing indeed. 

Mars Hill College is now in the thirteenth year of its expansion 
program. The sum of approximately $1,000,000 has been added to its 
endowment, student aid funds, buildings, and other equipment. It 
is essential, if not imperative, that another million dollars be raised. 
The increased financial support that is being received from the 
Baptist State Convention is challenging and encouraging. The 
college will give its best to the progress of the Kingdom of God 
on earth in return. 

Mars Hill College has a passionate desire to fulfill the purposes 
for which it was founded. The interest of friends everywhere is 
implored to the end that this ideal may be achieved. 

(d) Meredith College 
LeRoy Martin, President Board of Trustees 
115. Carlyle Campbell, President 

The total student enrollment for the year 1946-47 was 612. Twenty 
states and four foreign countries were represented; 83 per cent of 
the student body were North Carolinians. These students were 
affiliated with eleven different denominations, members of Baptist 
churches comprising 74 per cent of the total enrollment. The senior 
class numbered 124. Sixty-two new students entered with advanced 
credit from other colleges, twenty-four of whom had attended three 
of our North Carolina Baptist junior colleges. 

The auditor's report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1947, 
showed an income of $427,713.05 and expenditures amounting to 
$410,075.96. All student accounts receivable were paid in cash 
before the end of the year. We record with gratitude the receipt 
of $79,708 from the State Baptist Convention for current operations 
during the year. On the basis of this expected support and a slight 
increase in rates, we have felt justified in raising our schedule of 
staff salaries for 1947-48. 

Throughout the year we faced problems and difficulties, in many 
cases the result of a continuing post-war chaos and beyond our con- 
trol, which prevented the development we had anticipated; but, all 
things considered, we believe that it was a year of substantial 
achievement and promise. In the quality of educational procedures 
and in attachment to the basic ideals of our Christian culture, Mere- 
dith is rendering an ever-increasing service. 



150 Baptist State Convention 

The present academic year began with our orientation program 
for new students on September 15, 1947. By the first of last June 
all available dormitory accommodations had been reserved, and 
subsequent applicants for admission were so notified. At this date we 
have enrolled 578 students; with new registrations for the second 
semester and for the summer session, we shall have the largest year's 
enrollment in the history of the College. Various tests adminis- 
tered at entrance and reports from staff members indicate that it is 
also the most mature and promising group of students we have 
ever had. Three areas of activity are being stressed this year; the 
expansion of our guidance program; the improvement of instruc- 
tional procedures; the further development of training for religious 
workers. 

We eagerly await the time when it will appear appropriate to 
launch our building program. Through the generosity of our Baptist 
people, we have had for two years sufficient cash in hand for the 
proposed auditorium and music building, the first unit to be erected; 
but the Board of Trustees has felt that prevailing conditions have 
made it unwise to start any construction work not immediately 
obligatory. We rejoice in the almost daily receipt of contributions 
towards our expansion program and in the assurance that friends 
are resolve dto provide for Meredith financial resources commen- 
surate with its challenging opportunities. 

(e) Wake Forest College 
Irving E. Carlyle, President Board of Trustees 
116. Thurman D. Kitchin, President 

Registration in Wake Forest College for the fall semester of the 
1947-48 session has reached an all-time high of exactly 2,000. These 
are classified as follows: One thousand four hundred and eighty-nine 
in the school of Liberal Arts; 132 in the School of Law; 175 in the 
Medical School; and 199 in the School of Religion. It should be 
pointed out, however, that an additional 888 students of the liberal 
arts department are taking courses in Religion. There are five 
graduate students. Of the total number 1,703 are men and 297 are 
women. 

A new dormitory, modern in every respect, has been completed 
and is now occupied by 150 women. Other women students are 
housed in Bostwick Hall and in their own homes at Wake Forest. 
Hunter Dormitory, occupied formerly by women, has been returned 
to the men. The same thing is true of the "little dormitory," the 
renovated building next to Simmons Dormitory. The old Powers 
Building, privately owned, has been renovated and is occupied by 
students in the Law School. Some new houses have been erected by 
students themselves and additional "barracks" have been brought 
from Army camps and are in use as living quarters for students and 
faculty members. Crowded conditions prevail in most of the homes 
of the village. Trailers are in use wherever they can be located. Many 
students have been denied entrance for lack of room. 



of North Carolina 151 

Additions have been made to the teaching staff in order to provide 
adequately for the needs of students in the classrooms. By re- 
arranging schedules and making use of classroom space from 8:00 
to 4:30 p.m., the number of classrooms has been adequate and most 
of the classes are of normal size. For the first time the new chapel 
building was opened for use at the beginning of the summer session 
and is now used regularly. Much work remains to be done to com- 
plete the building inside, but it is now serving an important func- 
tion in a place where the entire student body and faculty can 
assemble for worship. 

On September 19, 1947, "Graylyn," the estate of the late Bowman 
Gray, recently given by Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Bernard to the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine, was formally dedicated as an addition to 
the Medical School for use in the study and treatment of neuroses 
and other psychiatric conditions. This unit is now in operation under 
a competent staff and is rendering a highly useful service. 

The Trustees of the college created in their June meeting a new 
department of Public Relations. The Reverend Eugene Olive, since 
1940 pastor of Wake Forest Baptist Church and Chaplain of Wake 
Forest College, was elected as director and assumed his new duties 
November 1. The former office of Alumni Secretary has been 
included in this department. In general, the department will be 
responsible for information about the college, alumni activities, and 
enlistment. 

Interest in religious life and activities on the campus was never 
more manifest. Dr. Harold W. Tribble spent eight days at the college 
recently speaking twice daily on the theme, "A Faith for Today." 
His preaching and conferences with individual students and groups 
were most wholesome. Student participation in various religious 
activities is gratifying. 

(f) Wingate Junior College 

E. S. Summers, Chairman Board of Trustees 
117. C. C. Burris, President 

The fifty-first session is now well underway, and hopes are very 
bright for a good year. 

Enrollment: The enrollment as of October 15, was 346. This is a 
record for any previous fall semester, and if room can be provided, 
the total for the year will reach or go beyond 400. There are eight 
states and one foreign country represented in total. North Carolina 
has 264; South Carolina 58; Cuba 15; and the remainder from 
Georgia, Virginia, Florida, Maryland, Tennessee, and New York. 

Buildings: Improvements have been made to the buildings and 
grounds, and new equipment for the library and science labora- 
tories. The Alumni Building for men is now in use, though it is not 
yet completed. The Efird Memorial Library will be in use by the 
first of the year. These buildings will take care of the immediate 
needs for housing for men and library facilities. The Public Housing 



152 Baptist State Convention 

Administration has allocated funds for the construction of eighteen 
housing units for married veterans. This will be ready for the spring 
semester. A new cafeteria, modern in every way, has been installed, 
so that the increased enrollment can be taken care of with ease. 
Prices for prepared food at the cafeteria are kept as low as possible 
to meet the budget of the student with limited funds. 

Faculty: Four new members have been added to the staff, which 
now totals 23. This increase permits smaller classes and personal 
attention on the part of the teacher. No teacher now has more than 
the normal teaching load. The faculty is not only well-prepared and 
experienced, but sympathetic and sacrificial. We feel that it com- 
pares favorably with other schools of our size and rank. 

The increased allocation of funds from The Cooperative Program 
for Christian Education has helped us to secure good teachers and 
to pay them a fair salary. The College has passed through many dark 
days, and yet has many problems unsolved, but a brighter day is 
here now, and with it Wingate College hopes to render even a better 
service to the Baptist cause and the Kingdom to the ends of the 
earth. 



of North Carolina 



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Baptist State Convention 



Graduates 

1946—1947 

and Summer 1947 


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of North Carolina 155 

VII. BENEVOLENCE 

119. 1. Relief and Annuity 

Below we give you a brief statement released to us by the Relief 
and Annuity Board, as of September 30, showing just what is being 
done in North Carolina through our retirement funds and the relief 
funds, both of which are handled by the Relief and Annuity Board, 
of which Walter R. Alexander is now Executive Secretary. 

Number of Receiving Totals 
Beneficiaries Annually 
(Old) Annuity Fund 

No. Paying Members .... 67 

Annuitants: Age 44 $18,960.22 

Disability .. 19 9,255.00 

Widows .... 40 11,556.84 

Orphans .... 1 300.00 $40,072.06 

Ministers' Retirement Plan 

Certificates Issued: 

M. R. P 689 

W. S. A. P 228 

Churches Cooperating 766 

Annuitants: Age 40 18,628.57 

Disability .. 7 2,631.92 

Widows .... 9 1,922.78 23,183.27 

Baptist Boards Employees' 

Retirment Plan 
No. Paying Members: 

B. B 43 

W. S. A. P 6 

Annuitants: Disability... 1 500.00 500.00 

Age Security Plan 

No. Paying Members .... 1 
No. Churches 

Cooperating 22 

Service Annuity Department 

No. Participating 1 

Annuitants: Age 1 58.20 

Disability .. 1 405.12 463.32 

Orphanage Institutions 
Pension Plan 

Certificates Issued- 221 

Annuitants: Age 18 6,152.84 6,152.84 

Relief Department 

Beneficiaries: Ministers.. 64 10,245.00 

Widows .. 71 8,066.00 18,311.00 

Total $88,682.49 



156 Baptist State Convention 

120. 2. North Carolina Baptist Hospital 

Annual Report of the Board of Trustees 
William J. Conrad, Chairman 

General: 

Deeply conscious of the tremendous responsibility which is ours, 
the Board of Trustees of your Hospital respectfully submits the fol- 
lowing report of its stewardship. 

Measured in dollars and cents, it is not a good report but in any 
other reckoning we believe it will stand forth as a worthy accom- 
plishment. 

Lost to us by reason of the four-year-rule and by resignation due 
to ill health are those two great leaders of the hospital, Mr. E. L. 
Davis and Mr. J. S. Lynch whose wise counsel and seasoned judg- 
ment we have sorely missed. 

During 1947 your board has faced many difficult problems and 
been confronted with such decisions as whether to undertake expan- 
sion at the present site — which is inadequate — or move to the ideal 
location, Graylyn Estate. Also to be decided was whether we should 
try to maintain the high standard of service at the hospital and its 
present volume of charity or whether by retrenchment to lower 
those standards and attempt to confine its charity and services 
strictly within the limits of the funds available. 

Having hoped for a Mother's Day offering of not less than $150,000 
we had to readjust our calculations when the offering fell short of 
that figure and, therefore, it is with a feeling of some concern and 
a measure of discouragement that we face for 1947 an operating 
deficit of between $30,000 and $40,000. 

Investigation, however, proves that our problems in the main are 
not peculiar to this institution, but are general in the field of hos- 
pital work. While the offering referred to above did not reach the 
figure we had hoped for, nevertheless, were it not for the generous 
giving in our churches and Sunday schools on Mother's Day, it 
would be altogether impossible for us to administer to the sick and 
sick poor in His name. Too much credit cannot be given to the pas- 
tors under whose direction our people have been inspired to give 
to this worthy Christian cause. 

Professionally and educationally, the hospital continues to be fully 
approved by the standardizing and rating agencies of this country. 
In reciting this approval, due credit must be given to the Bowman 
Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College for its important 
part in raising the caliber of our service. 

Too little is known about our teaching role within the walls where 
sickness prevails. Hand in hand with the care of the sick, we are 
operating a school of nursing, a school of X-ray technology, a school 
of anesthesia and a pastoral clinic. There are close to one hundred 
fifty students in these various schools. In addition to this, the hos- 
pital and its facilities are used for teaching medical students and 



of North Carolina 157 

laboratory technicians. We have approximately seventy-five doctors 
studying graduate work so that they may become specialists or more 
proficient in certain fields of endeavor. Our work in the field of 
medicine and healing is becoming known internationally as well as 
nationally. 

Religious: 

Our work in the Department of Religion has been most fruitful 
and gratifying during the past year. Dr. W. K. McGee is Director 
of the Department of Religion and Mr. Richard K. Young is Chap- 
lain and Assistant in the Department. Miss Edith Arrington is stu- 
dent secretary, working with medical students and student nurses, 
and Miss Sue Penn is a full-time secretary for the Department. For 
the first time in the history of our institution, a ten-week course in 
clinical pastoral training was given to five men and two women from 
our Seminary. The course was under the direction of Dr. Wayne 
Oates from our Seminary in Louisville. He was assisted by the 
members of our Department of Religion. We believe that here we 
have made one of the most forward steps in religion and health that 
has ever been made in the history of this great institution. The 
profound relationship between the spiritual and the physical, with 
special emphasis on its effect upon the health of our people, was 
completely explored through intense seminars and reading, visita- 
tion with the patients in the hospital and working in the Out-Patient 
Department. The value of such a program to the work of the King- 
dom cannot be over-estimated. It prepares the pastor for work in his 
community and within his pastorate at a high level of understand- 
ing. Nor can the value of this program to the future of the hospital 
be overlooked. Through such close observation and cooperation 
with the hospital, these men and women will gain an intimate 
knowledge of what we are doing, and how important this work is to 
the denomination. We would hope that all members of our denomina- 
tion, were it possible, could have this close association with our 
work. To help further our usefulness in this work, there will be a 
course specifically designed for pastors in the field beginning in 
January, 1948, under the direction of the Hospital Chaplain, Mr. 
Young. 

Patient Service: 

Your hospital has had another year of operation at capacity. We 
have had the ever-present waiting list of over 700 people from all 
over the State during this year. The hospital will treat 8,000 patients 
inside the hospital for a total of over 88,000 patient days in 1947. Of 
these patients, about 4,000 will be free or part-pay, and about 40,000 
patient days will be given to those patients. Professional services for 
these patients are donated by the specialists in the Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine. Eliminating altogether what the cost of profes- 
sional fees would have been, the net cost of charity will exceed 
$200,000 during this year. 



158 Baptist State Convention 

In addition to this in-patient work, the hospital's Out-Patient De- 
partment will have, during 1947, over 25,000 visits. These patients 
are given a complete diagnostic examination by the hospital spe- 
cialists at no charge except a small registration fee and reduced 
charges for X-rays. Only patients unable to pay specialists' fees 
are supposed to be examined in the Out-Patient Clinic. 

An additional 30,000 patients are examined by these same special- 
ists in the pay-clinic operated by the Medical School. 

Patients to our Out-Patient Department came from eighty-two of 
the one hundred counties in North Carolina. This is in keeping with 
the hospital's efforts to serve the entire State and indicates a recogni- 
tion by doctors and laymen throughout the State of the excellent 
work being done here. 

The hospital's trained specialists and modern equipment make 
possible the diagnostic facilities necessary for patients suffering 
from obscure diseases that cannot be diagnosed by outlying com- 
munity doctors. In many cases, when the causes for such diseases are 
found, the patient can be treated at home and is referred to the 
doctor of his choice in his local community who is given directions 
for treatment. 

Financial Operations: 

In our report to the general board last year, we mentioned the 
tremendous charity load of the hospital had been complicated by a 
serious rise in costs. The cost of this charity had been met by in- 
creased charges to patients able to pay, and we were hoping that 
costs would not continue to rise. It is past history that such has 
not been the case, and it is the opinion of some that costs will con- 
tinue to rise even further. In preparing the budget for 1947, the 
board raised rates to a level which it thought was as high as it would 
like to go. In so doing, we were $30,000 short of our heeds. Because 
of the increased cost of charity care, it was decided to raise the 
Mother's Day goal from $120,000 to $150,000, with the still further 
hope that prices would not rise above the anticipated level shown in 
the budget. It is now apparent that Mother's Day contributions 
will not exceed last year's contribution of $120,000 by more than 
four or five thousand dollars. While we recognize that this repre- 
sents a truly wonderful spirit and generous response towards meet- 
ing the needs of the hospital on the part of our people, the cold fact 
remains that in 1947 we are facing an operating deficit of around 
$40,000 as a direct result of increased costs and the volume of our 
charity. This does not include estimated depreciation on buildings 
and equipment of approximately $50,000. We hope that ways and 
means can be found to forestall this deficit. Our only endowment 
is the people of our denomination through whose prayers and con- 
tributions we are enabled to maintain this Christian ministry. 

The hospital offers complete hospitalization and a service ward 
bed to every minister regardless of denomination free of charge. 
Those ministers, missionaries, and ministerial students who desire a 



of North Carolina 159 

private room are allowed a 50 per cent reduction and are given a 
very reasonable doctor's fee. None of the Mother's Day money is 
used for this purpose. The Board in the past has been able to finance 
this good service as a part of its regular program. 

Your Board continues its pledge that every penny given for 
charity work will be used only for that purpose. Our per cent share 
of the cooperative fund is now being held in the office in Raleigh 
for the purpose of paying the $155,000 debt and funding $400,000 
to be used in our expansion program. This decision was reached at 
the 1946 Baptist State Convention. We had previously used this per 
cent share of the cooperative fund for improving our services, mod- 
ernizing our building, building new additions, and replacing worn 
out equipment. 

Facilities: 

There have been many interesting developments since our last 
convention when, as a result of a plea from the hospital, the con- 
vention overwhelmingly voted to advance $400,000 toward the 
expansion program of the hospital. This was in addition to $200,000 
already pledged by the members of the faculty of the Medical 
School. A circular letter in December of the same year resulted in 
contributions of around $9,000. Subsequently, we received a gift of 
1,000 shares of stock valued at $20,000 from Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Williams of Swepsonville, North Carolina, for this purpose. How- 
ever, immediately after the convention had voted the $400,000 for 
our expansion program, certain interested individuals in Winston- 
Salem contacted the Board of Trustees. These people are leaders in 
the community of Winston-Salem. They proposed that we should 
build no further on our present site but that we make an earnest 
attempt to move our hospital and Medical School to Graylyn Estate 
as promptly as possible, offering to contribute liberally to such a 
move. Plans for this move are now being formulated and we are 
hopeful that within the near future we can begin building certain 
units of the new hospital and Medical School on that beautiful 
location. 

3: Orphanage 
Zeno Wall, President of Board of Trustees 
121. I. G. Greer, General Superintendent 

There are certain reasons why orphanages and other child-caring 
agencies are necessary. Among these are poverty, poor health, illit- 
eracy, and instability in the home. 

The Baptist Orphanage was founded for the purpose of caring 
for orphan children and yet one of the chief concerns of welfare 
agencies of the present time is the wrecked home. There are over a 
thousand children in the orphanages of North Carolina who have 
both parents living. 

The Baptist Orphanage has rarely ever been able to accept all the 
children for whom applications have been made and yet it has been 
too much on the receiving end of the line. A great surgeon does not 



160 Baptist State Convention 

operate until he has made a thorough diagnosis. Institutions should 
analyze and get the background of each case before a child is admit- 
ted. Providing food, clothing and shelter is not the full answer. Many 
children for whom applications are made should never come to the 
orphanage. Peter at the Gate Beautiful would have done the beggar 
grave injustice if he had given him money. Instead he said: "Silver 
and gold have I none; but such as I have give I thee: in the name of 
Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk." 

We believe that one of the greatest services the orphanage can 
render is to make it possible for parents and children to help them- 
selves. In addition to service we are rendering to children in the 
orphanage we should help preserve and improve homes that are in 
danger of breaking down. Last year the orphanage, through its case 
work helped to make adjustments for more than four hundred chil- 
dren where applications had been made to enter the orphanage. 

In order to care for more children during these days when it is so 
expensive to build, the orphanage authorities are developing a pro- 
gram of boarding home care. This enables them to place children 
in good homes under the supervision of the orphanage and thus give 
many children the privilege of having a good home without placing 
them in the institution. 

Since living expenses have so skyrocketed we are thankful for 
the results of our farm activities during the past year both at the 
Kennedy Home and the Mills Home. It is expensive to farm but by 
hard work and careful management we have been able to produce 
most 01 our meat, poultry, vegetables, milk, and most of our feed 
for a third less than it would have cost us on the market. 

Since the meeting of our last Convention the orphanage has sus- 
tained a heavy loss in the passing of our Treasurer, R. D. Covington 
and Farm Manager, C. C. McKoin. The long faithful service each 
of these rendered will carry over into the life of the orphanage for 
many years to come. While no one can take the place of another, 
we are glad to announce that these two important positions have 
been filled by Mr. J. D. Fraley and Mr. Paul Keyes respectively, 
who have entered heartily and efficiently into the life of the orphan- 
age. 

Our program has been somewhat crippled recently on account of 
the illness of Editor John Arch McMillan. For several week his seri- 
ous illness gave the orphanage staff and his friends over the State 
serious concern. It is gratifying to be able to say at this time that he 
is gradually improving and beginning to assume his responsibilities 
again as Editor of Charity and Children. We are under great obliga- 
tions to all who contributed to the success of the paper during 
Mr. McMillan's illness. 

During the year our pastor, J. A. Neilson, resigned from the Mills 
Home church, after a long period of faithful and efficient service to 
become pastor of Immanuel Church, Greenville, N. C. The church 
called J. O. Walton from Southside Church, Wilmington, to succeed 



of North Carolina 161 

Mr. Neilson. His life and leadership on the campus and in all phases 
of the orphanage interests has already proven to be a great bene- 
diction. 

Last year the orphanage cared for seven hundred children; sixty 
of these were cared for in boarding homes and fifty by Mothers' Aid. 
Case work service was made available to 1,107 children. This was 
made possible through loyalty of the Baptist denomination and other 
friends who month by month and at Thanksgiving time give to the 
support of these children in keeping with the will of the Master. 
Year after year we are more conscious that the method of support- 
ing the orphanage through a once-a-month and Thanksgiving offer- 
ings is a wise Christian policy. In addition to cash offerings, the 
orphanage at all times can use canned goods and other commodities 
needed for the daily support of a large family. 

In spite of the many demands that are being placed upon the 
denomination we feel that our friends once more will pledge their 
support to this institution that is dedicated to the task of making 
strong, clean, Christian men and women out of the boys and girls 
in our care. 

VIII. REPORT OF THE NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

122. G. W. Paschal, Chairman 

During the past year there has been much manifestation of inter- 
est in Baptist history. Most important of all is the fact that the 
Southern Baptist Convention at its meeting in May 1947 gave the 
Southern Baptist Historical Society a coordinate status with other 
departments of their work, and appointed for it a Board of Directors, 
one for each state, to be supported with appropriations by the Con- 
vention and make to it annual reports of the progress of their work. 
On September 9 this Board met in Louisville and effected an 
organization and adopted a constitution, and elected as its officers 
Dr. W. O. Carver of the Louisville Seminary president, and Dr. 
H. I. Hester of William Jewell College, Liberty, Missouri, secretary- 
treasurer. Our Commission strongly recommends that those inter- 
ested in our Baptist history become members of this Society. 

The Commission is glad to report that progress in building up the 
North Carolina Baptist Historical Collection in the Library of Wake 
Forest College continues and is making one of the most valuable 
Baptist collections in the entire country. Mrs. Ethel Taylor Critten- 
den, Director of the Collection, devotes her entire time to building 
it up, seeking to add to it not only rare books and other publica- 
tions and manuscripts relating to Baptist history, but also current 
minutes of associations and conventions both of North Carolina and 
other states. To the collection are" sent regularly also the Baptist 
newspapers of the country, all or nearly all, which are assembled 
into volumes and catalogued and made available for users. All back 

li 



162 Baptist State Convention 

numbers of these papers are diligently sought for. In this work of 
collection of minutes, newspapers, pamphlets, and letters relating 
to Baptist history, and of church record books, she begs the assist- 
ance of our people and churches. 

There has been no publication of a major Baptist historical work 
during the year, but several are in preparation and nearing com- 
pletion. However, important studies of matters relating to Bap- 
tist history have been produced and some of them published. 
Among these is a dissertation of considerable length on North Caro- 
lina Baptists and Slavery, by Miss Willie Grier (now Mrs. Todd of 
Buford, Ga.), a graduate student of the University of North Carolina. 
This appeared in the April number of the North Carolina Historical 
Beview. Another study, the formation of separate churches by the 
colored members of North Carolina Baptist churches after the Civil 
War has been written by Mr. E. W. Midyette of North Carolina Col- 
lege, Durham, N. C. It is highly praised but has been published only 
in mimeographed copies. The Baptist Collection at Wake Forest was 
made freely available to these writers. 

The Commission heard with much sorrow of the death of R. R. 
Saunders, the author of a compendious history of the Reidsville Bap- 
tist Church, of which mention was made in our last report. Its publi- 
cation was delayed by his death, but it was already in the press and 
will soon appear. Another important church history is that of the 
Magnolia Baptist Church of the New South River Association. It 
was written by H. S. Averitt, Sr., of Fayetteville, a former member, 
and is well ordered. The Commission would advise our churches 
which are now reaching their centennial anniversaries and calling 
for the writing of their histories to secure for that great work the 
ablest person among them. To write a good church history is no 
little task. 

The Commission recommends that in some years a place be made 
for a historical address in our Convention program. 

IX. THE BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

123. Mary Ayscue, Manager 

Salute to the Baptist Book Store, 304 N. Tryon St., Charlotte, 
N. C. This dream became a reality when on October 17, the doors 
opened to a building of which the Baptists of North Carolina may be 
proud. 

Miss Evelyn Hampton of Winston-Salem is the manager of this 
newest member of our family. Nearly 400 persons came for the 
dedicatory service and reception, and there has been a steady stream 
of customers ever since. 

Though Charlotte is not quite ready for mail order business, after 
the first of the year we hope that the Charlotte store for the con- 
venience of the people in the west, and the Raleigh store for the peo- 
ple of the east, will march together as a team to be a real part of 
the Christian Education program of the Baptists of North Carolina. 



of North Carolina 163 

Statistics do not always give an accurate picture of a situation, and 
cannot ever give a complete picture of a religious organization; but in 
considering a store, one is certainly interested in comparative figures. 
The sales for the first nine months of 1946 were $118,519.95. Dur- 
ing the first nine months of 1947, our sales have been $159,463.33. 
Of course, advancing prices would account for some of the gross 
increase, but the number of sales and customers increase daily. 

Our Staff has changed some during the year, and the training of 
new personnel has made our work not quite up to what we wanted 
it to be this fall; but four months should take us over the hump. 
When they are acquainted with their work our staff will be the finest 
anywhere. 

Miss Hampton now has two full-time and two part-time helpers 
in Charlotte. There are eleven members of the staff in Raleigh. In 
addition, there is a full-time person in the field of visual aids, and 
another in the church library service. These two young women will 
serve the people of the State through both stores. 

Service is something which cannot be measured in terms of fig- 
ures. Nearly every employee of your Baptist Book Stores has 
attended one of our Baptist schools. This is a consecrated group of 
young women who want to serve Christ, not just individuals who 
fill jobs. 

When the Charlotte store begins mail order, we should be able 
to keep enough stock in the space we will have in the two stores to 
give prompt service on all items. All of us pledge you our best effor 
of mind and body to be acceptable servants. 

124. *X. RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. That the division of Undesignated Cooperative Program funds 
as between State Convention Objects and Southern Convention 
Objects be on a 50-50 basis, and that the funds so designated for 
State Convention Objcts be divided as follows: 

Per Cent 

Christian Education (Colleges) 30 

State Missions 13 

Hospital 7 



50 

2. That the Convention authorize a continuance of the work with 
our Indian brethren, and that the Board be authorized to work out 
such plans as will seek to help them in using some of their own 
people who are now adequately trained for the task at hand. 

3. That the appropriation to aid the Negro Convention in its 
general work be continued. 

4. That the work at the sanatoriums and at Samarcand be con- 
tinued; and that the Board be authorized to expand the work to the 
extent its resources will permit. 



* See page 34, section 12, and following pages for additional recommenda- 
tions. 



164 Baptist State Convention 

5. That the Convention give assurance to the agencies of the 
Southern Convention that it will undertake to provide for the objects 
of the Southern Convention, through the Undesignated Cooperative 
Program and through special offerings, a sum total of at least 
$1,000,000.00, which is ten per cent of the ten million dollar goal 
for the objects of the Southern Baptist Convention, and that in 
order to do this and to take care of the objects of the State Conven- 
tion, there be an over-all goal of $2,500,000.00 for the year 1948; 
that the goal for the Undesignated Cooperative Program be set at 
$1,500,000.00; that each and every pastor, and each and every church, 
undertake to increase the offerings through the Undesignated Co- 
operative Program twenty-five per cent in 1948 over 1947; and that 
inasmuch as Southern Baptists are trying to enlist a million tithers, 
the goal for North Carolina be set at one hundred thousand at least; 
that in the event the one hundred thousand which are being sought 
are not enlisted during 1947, that the effort be continued in 1948 
until this maximum goal shall be reached. 

6. That the Board be authorized and empowered to set aside an 
amount not to exceed $7,500.00 for the use of the Allied Church 
League; that the Convention nominate 55 persons to be elected by 
the Board of Trustees of the League as the Convention's representa- 
tives on the board of the League; and that on some Sunday in Janu- 
ary, preferably the last Sunday in the month, every pastor in the 
State be requested to give his people a message on temperance, and 
inform them of what is going on among the Christian people of the 
State to endeavor to rid North Carolina of beverage alcohol. 

7. That the Convention approve the purchase of the property at 
119 Hillsboro Street in Raleigh; and that, now that the Recorder 
Building is paid for, such funds as have been used to purchase that 
building be utilized for the purchase of the new site. 

8. That the Convention approve the lease of the property m 
Charlotte, and that by proper resolution the General Board and the 
Trustees of the Convention be authorized to purchase the property 
located at 304 North Tryon Street, Charlotte, as soon as it may be 
practicable after the meeting of the Convention. 

9. That inasmuch as the Board was given authority at the last 
Convention to get an option on and/or secure a site and/or build- 
ings in the eastern part of the State for the purpose of providing a 
summer assembly grounds in that section, that the Convention now 
authorize the Board, through its Executive Committee, to take the 
necessary steps to open an assembly about the first of June, 1948, r 
the site near Fort Fisher, which has been leased. 

10. That the Board be authorized and empowered to ©xtend aid to 
the Biblical Recorder during 1948 in order to increase the circula- 
tion through the Club and Every-Family Plan and at the same time 
hold the cost to the subscribers at a figure as low as possible; and 
that the amount of aid, and the basis upon which it shall be granted, 
be left to the General Board in its January, 1948, meeting. 



of North Carolina 165 

11. That the Board be authorized to continue the Assembly begun 
at Fruitland, and that if it is possible to do so the $9,000 that has 
been given by the Woman's Missionary Union be kept in a special 
fund for future development of the property, it being understood, 
however, that for the time being the Board may use the money for 
capital outlay, but not for current operating costs. 

12. That the Board be authorized and empowered to continue its 
study of the prospects for establishing a home for aged people; and 
if possible to do so that a definite proposal be brought to the Con- 
vention in its 1948 session. 

13. That the recommendation of The Council on Christian Educa- 
tion with reference to the distribution of allocated funds for the year 
1948 be approved. The recommendation reads: "That the pattern 
of distribution of allocated funds to the several colleges in 1947 
be followed in the year 1948." 



166 Baptist State Convention 



AUDITOR'S STATEMENT 

Executive Committee of the General Board, 
Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Gentlemen: 

According to your instructions, we have audited the books and records of the Convention for the twelve months 
ended December 31, 1947, and in the following tabulations we show the Revenue and Expenses of the General Fund 
together with all Cash Receipts and Disbursements of the other funds. The statements of the Hospital and or- 
phanage were prepared from reports sent in by these institutions and not audited by us. 

All cash receipts were found promptly deposited in the bank and Disbursements were supported by cancelled 
check, invoices, etc., with Expenses properly classified. Our examination did not disclose any evidence of irreg- 
ularities and we believe the funds have been carefully and honestly handled and properly accounted for. 

Just b;low is a summary ,not audited, prepared from the reports of the various institutions showing the total 
of all income for convention objects for the calendar year 1947: 

INCOME FOR ALL CONVENTION OBJECTS 
Calendar Year 1947 

Undesignated S 1,251,322.45 

W. M. U. Specials _ 20,352.08 

State Missions.. _ 113,563.14 

Foreign Missions 286,324.59 

Home Missions 74. 687 , 59 

Ministerial Relief 4,195.17 

North Carolina Hospital. 124,134.78 

Ministerial Education _ _ 5, 494 . 64 

Wake Forest Chapel Building Fund 851.60 

Enlargement Fund for Colleges 37,294.30 

Fruitland Expansion Fund _ 5, 000 . 00 

American Bible Society 4, 876. 69 

Designated for Baptist Orphanage 479, 1 44. 92 

GRAND TOTAL . $ 2,407,241.95 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. T. Allen and Company 
Certified Public Accountants 
Raleigh, N. C, March 15, 1948 

REVENUE AND EXPENSES-GENERAL FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Revenue: 

From Churches— Undesignated $ 1,251,322.45 

W. M. U. Funds sent Direct— (See Contra in Disbursements) 20,352.08 

From Home Mission Board for City and Rural Missions 9,372.82 

Returned Checks Collected 121.40 

Totql Revenue to Account for... _ _._$ 1,281,168.75 

Expenses Chargeable to Undesignated Revenue: 

Salaries Paid: 

General Secretary and Treasurer ? 6,900.00 

Bookkeeper 2,742.00 

Office Secretary 2,742.00 

First assistant bookkeeper 1, 740 . 00 

Second Assistant bookkeeper 138.75 $ 14,262.75 

Re n t— -General Secretary and Treasurer 1 , 872 . 00 

Travel Expense and Car Insurance— General. Secretary and Treasurer 2,634.63 

Printing 2,082.99 

Postage _^_ 1,033.93 

Tele phon e and Telegraph 475. 17 

Audit— General 600.00 

Supplies and Repairs 1,871.52 

Compensation Insurance 135.13 

Expense Board and Committee meetings 3,529.15 

Publishing Receipts 963.80 

Error In Acknowledgement 3 , 1 52 . 08 

Returned Checks 1,010.98 

Bank Service Charges 680 . 44 

Aid to Biblical Recorder Every Family Plan 8,483.59 



of North Carolina 167 

General Missionaries: 

Salary and Rent Allowances— E. L. Spivey $ 5 , 280 . 00 

Travel Expense— E. L. Spivey. : 1,454.35 

Salary and Rent Allowance— J. C. Pipes 3,858.00 

Travel Expense -J. C. Pipes.. 771.52 

Salary and Rent Allowance— E. L. Bradley 4,926.00 

Travel Expense -E. L. Bradley 1,338.16 I 17,628.03 

Associational Missions: 

Salary and Rent Allowance — General Superintendent S 4, 668 . 00 

Travel Expenses — General Superintendent 960.83 

City Missionaries 14, 419. 94 

Associational Missionaries 29,594.95 49,643.72 

W. M. U. Department: 

Sa.ary Executive Secretary _ $ 2,784.00 

Salary Treasurer .... 2,580.00 

Salary Young People's Leader 1, 640 . 00 

Salary— R. A. Secretary-. 2,484.00 

Salary— Field Worker 1,980.00 

Salary— Stenographers 3,210.00 

Rent— Offices __ 774.00 

Printing and Postage ■_.__ 6,260.74 

Expense 5,500.00 27,212.74 

Retirement Funds: 

Salary Bookkeeper S 2,280.00 

Minister's Retirement Plan 8,792.94 

Board's Employees' Plan 1,815.12 

Widow's Supplemental Plan 7, 053 . 44 

Printing and Postage 461.90 20,403.40 

Contingent: 

Designation for American Baptist Seminary $ 500.00 

Designation for Southern Baptist Seminary 480. 00 

Designation for Baptist Theological Seminary 100.00 

Designation for New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 100.00 

Special Gift for Work In High Point 550.00 

Baptist World Alliance 1,200.00 

Miscellaneous 41.50 2,971.50 

Total operating Expenses $ 160, 647 . 55 

ADD: W. M. IT. Funds Sent Direct— (Contra in Receipts) 20,352.08 

Total Disbursements $ 180,999.63 

Distributable Balance— General Fund $1,100,169.12 

Distribution To Other Funds: 

State Missions 13% $ 143,021.98 

North Carolina Hospital 7% 77,011.85 

Education 30% 330,050.74 

Southwide Objects 50% 550,084.55 

Total 100% $1,100,169.12 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— STATE MISSIONS FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Designated $ 95,799.05 

Baptist Sunday School Board 15,499.71 

N. C. Baptist Foundation 495.00 

Miscellaneous: 

Sale Property at Fruitland 85.00 

Insurance Dividend 6.41 

Insurance for Fire at W. C $ 3,312.83 

Less: Replacements and Expenses • 3,572.41 $ 259.58 

Sales of Lots in Wilmington 1,897.80 

Dividends on Stock __ 31. 25 

Sale of Annuals. 8.50 

Total _. ..._$ 113,563.14 

ADD: Share of General Fund 143,021.98 

Borrowed Money on Note 40,000.00 

Total Receipts $ 296,585.12 

Balance December 31, 1946 30,521.85 

Total to Account For $ 327,106.97 



168 Baptist State Convention 



Disbursements: 

Division of Sunday Schools: 

Salary and Rent Allowance— Secretary $ 4 , 830 . 00 

Travel Expense — Secretary _ _ _ 6 1 4 . 05 

Salary and Rent Allowance — Associational Man 500.00 

Travel Expense — Associational Man __ 106.15 

Salary —Associate Secretary 2 , 496 . 00 

Travel Expense — Associate Secretary 307. 14 

Salary— Qffice Secretary 1,740.00 

Printing and Postage _ 1, 122.51 

Rent Office 393.00 

Incidentals 768.85 

Convention Expense 991.26 

Clinics _ 2,401.45 

Vacation Bible Schools 1 2,464.41 

Associational Work 4, 624 . 57 

Total Division of Sunday Schools $ 23,359.39 

Division of Training Union: 

Salary and Rent Allowance— Secretary _ $ 4 , 648 . 00 

Travel Expense — Secretary 971 .15 

Salary and Rent Allowance — Young People's Leader__ 2,400.00 

Travel Expense — Young People's Leader 476 . 96 

Salary — Intermediate Leader 1, 050 . 00 

Travel — Intermediate Leader 124.56 

Salary— Junior Leader 2,088.00 

Travel— Junior Leader 270.81 

Salary— Office Secretary ... 2,016.00 

Printing and Postage 1,321.44 

Office Rent.1 520.00 

Incidentals 744 . 98 

Assembly 1,291.74 

Associational Work 3,947.82 

Central Training Schools 491.20 

Total Division of Training Union $ 22,362.66 

Division of Student Work: 

Salary and Rent Allowance — State Secretary S 1, 761. 75 

Travel Expense — State Secretary 846.03 

Salary— Office Secretary .- 1,715.38 

Rent Office 460.00 

Postage, Printing Reveille, Incidentals, etc 1,211. 53 

Focus Weeks and Conference Retreats 758 . 48 

Woman's College, Greensboro, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary 1 , 672 .00 

Travel Expense — Student Secretary 12.00 

Upkeep Student House .. 720.65 

East Carolina Teachers College, Greenville, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary 1,612.50 

Travel — Student Secretary 70. 02 

Upkeep Student Center 370.42 

Appalachian State Teachers College, Boone, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary 1,500.00 

Travel — Student Secretary 41. 83 

Incidentals 178.06 

Janitor at Student Center 150.00 

Duke University, Durham, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary 480.00 

Incidentals 11-09 

N. C. State College, Raleigh, N. C: 

Salary and Rent Allowance — Student Secretary 3, 084. 00 

Travel — Student Secretary 76. 30 

Expense and Incident als 1 1 000 . 00 

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary... 4,005.00 

Furniture for Student Lounge.. 875.71 

Expense 1,183.11 

Meredith College, Raleigh, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary 700.00 

Campbell College, Buie's Creek, N. C: 

Salary — Student Secretary . 533 . 33 

Wake Forest College, Wake Forest, N. C: 

Salary— Student Secretary 165.40 

Salary Secretary— Baptist Hospital 1,500.00 

Total Division of Student Work $ 26,694.59 






of North Carolina 169 



Other State Mission Wohk: 
Visual Education, Radio and Publicity: 

Salary-Secretary _$ 4,464.00 

Travel Expense— Secretary 1,597. 16 

Stenographer 1,070.00 

Office Expense 518.91 

Rent— Field Worker 165.00 

Travel— Field Worker 490.74 

Equipment, etc 2,645.82 

Publicity Reporting Convention _ 87.76 

Library of Cuts and Mats 9.00 $ 11,048.39 



Evangelism: 

Salary and Rent Allowance— Secretary $ 5 , 220 . 00 

Travel— Secretary 855.98 6,075.9! 



Salaries — Missionary Pastors $ 46, 346. 19 

Aid General Baptist State Convention (Negro) 2,700.00 

Work at Sanatoriums 1, 657 . 00 

Fruitland Assembly: 

Capital Expense $ 80,359.44 

Current Expense 14,350.41 94,709.85 

Church Extensions: 

Roanoke Association $ 100.00 

Young Street— Cabarrus 1,000.00 

Archdale— Randolph 2,000.00 

Oakhurst— Randolph 2,025.00 

Gaston— Roanoke ._ _ 2,000.00 

West End— Roanoke 800 . 00 

Kellum— Atlantic 750.00 

Gospel— Brushy Mountain 600 . 00 

Tabernacle— Rowan 500.00 

Immanuel — Piedmont 500 . 00 

Royal Oak— Cabarrus 500.00 

Others 3,104.91 13,959.91 



Summer Student Program _ 8, 740 . 97 

Aid to Ministerial Students 5,593.50 

Allied Church League 7,500.00 

Indian Work— Salaries and Travel 2,500.00 

Pastor's Schools: 

Fruitlind ...$ 2,171.93 

Others 2,309.54 4,481.47 

Biblical Recorder— Building Fund 2,500.00 

Annuity Insurance and Repairs: 

Spilman and Bridges Cottages 298.99 

Upkeep Chapel Hill Church. _ 600.00 

Convention Minutes 2 , 470 . 94 

State Convention Expense 820.37 

Salary and Expense — Recording Secretary 257 . 00 

Statistical Printing and Postage 472 . 20 

State Mission Day Expense 1.279,41 

Recorder Subscriptions to Pastors and Libraries 2,530. 13 

Advertising Space — Biblical Recorder. _ 3, 523 . 00 

Baptist Foundation Expense 53.04 

Contingent: 

Seaside Assembly — Lease and Equipment $ 14 , 836 . 97 

Charlotte Building.. ._ _ ._ ._ 35,700.00 

Charlotte Book Store— Transfer _ . 7 , 000 . 00 

World Alliance. 1,200.00 

Carey Street Missions 793.08 

Interest on Borrowed Money 333 . 33 

Repairs and Moving Furnitures 299 . 50 

Insurance office Furniture 120. 35 

Radio Survey 128.45 

Bessie Morgan (Aid) 116.65 

Miscellaneous 163.45 S 60,691.78 



Total Other State Missions Work $ 280,810.12 



TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS $ 353,226.79 

BALANCE DECEMBER 31, 1947 (overdraft) 26,119.79 



Total Accounted For ,.,_.,_.___, __$ 327, 106.97 



170 Baptist State Convention 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— SOUTHWIDE OBJECTS 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Designations: 

Foreign Missions $ 252 ,177.12 

Home Missions 74 , 687 . 59 

M inisters Relief — Regular 1, 670 . 1 7 

Foreign Missions sent Direct (See Contra In Disbursements) 34,147.47 

Total .- $ 362,682.35 

ADD: Share of General Fund 550,084.55 

Total Receipts $ 912,766.90 

ADD: Balance December 31, 1946 174,213.50 

Total To Account For... 11,086,980.40 

Disbursements: 

Foreign Missions — Paid on Designations $ 268 , 500 . 09 

Home Missions — Paid on Designations 74,398.01 

Ministers Relief Regular — Paid on Designations 1,591.85 

Paid on Southwide objects Program 534,337.35 

Foreign Missions Sent Direct (See Contra In Receipts) 34, 147.47 

Total Disbursements $912, 974. 77 

Balance December 31 , 1947 __ 174, 005. 63 

Total Accounted For $1,086,980.40 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— MINISTERS' RELIEF FUND— SPECIAL 

12 MonthsEnded December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

From Baptist Foundation $ 2,525.00 

ADD: Balance December 31, 1946 1,978.23 

Total to A ccount For j . 4 593 23 

Balance December 31, 1947 __ $ 4,503.23 

Total Accounted For _ . _ $ 4, 503 . 23 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS-NORTH CAROLINA HOSPITAL 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Designated $ 40,836.40 

Share of General Fund 77,011.85 

Funds Sent Direct — (See Contra In Disbursements) 83,298.38 

Total Receipts $ 201,146.63' 

Balance December 31, 1946 . 11,390.45 

Total to Account For g 212,537.08 

Disbursements: 

Paid on Designations $ 40,686.70 

Remittances— Share General Fund 75,508.15 ■-.'■ -.' 

Funds Sent Direct— (See Contra In Receipts) 83,298.38 V-- 

Total Disbursements $ 1 99 , 493 . 23 

Balance December 31, 1947 13,043.85 

Total Accounted For f 212,537.08 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— EDUCATION FUND 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Disignated Funds $ -5,254.64 - 

Baptist Foundation Investments ',-': 240.00 

Share General Fund ___. 330,050.74 

Total Receipts $ 335,545.38 

Balance December31, 1946 66,127.49 

Total To Account For $ 401,672.87 



of North Carolina 171 



Disbursements: 
Current Support: 

Wake Forest College _t 100,000.00 

Mars Hill College 56,000.00 

. Campbell College 40,000.00 

Wingate College 24,000.00 

Meredith College 72,000.00 

Gardner Webb 40,000.00 $ 332,000.00 



Errors In Acknowledgments 142.29 

Expenses: 

Salary and Rent Allowance — Secretary _$ 7,200.00 

Travel Expense — Secretary 1, 163. 01 

Salary— Office Secretary 1,800.00 

Office Rent 600.00 

Printing, Postage and Miscellaneous ... 1,886.72 

Meetings of Council 1,636.80 

Audits 3,250.00 17,536.53 



Total Disbursements _ $ 349,678.82 

Balance December31, 1947 51,994.05 



Total Accounted For g 401,672.87 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— WAKE FOREST CHAPEL BUILDING FUNDS 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Designations _ S 851. 60 

Balance December 31, 1946 28,969.15 



Total to Account For $ 29,820.75 



Disbursements: 

Paid on Designations ...$ 8,456.90 

Balance December 31, 1947 21,363.85 



Total Accounted For S 29,820.75 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— SOUTHWESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY CHAPEL 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Balance December 31, 1946— To Account For $ 22.34 

Disbursements: 
Paid on Designations $ 22. 34 



Total Accounted For { 22,34 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS-AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Designated Funds $ 4,876.68 

Balance December 31, 1946 371.67 

Totol to Account For $ 5,248.36 



Disbursements: 

Paid on Designations { 4, 763 . 02 

Balance December 31, 1947 .... 485.34 



Total Accounted For $ 5,248.36 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY CHAPEL 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 

Balance December 31, 1946— To Account For $ 105.00 



Disbursements: 
Paid on Designations. 



Total Aceountrd For. 



CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS-ENLARGEMENT FUND FOR COLLEGES 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 
Designations: 

Wake Forest College $ 525.00 

Wake Forest College— By Convention 34,430.30 

Meredith College 1,329.00 

Gardner Webb 1,010.00 

Total to Account For S 37,294.30 



172 Baptist State Convention 



Disbursements: 

Paid on Designations: 

Meredith College $ 1,364.00 

Gardner Webb 1,010.00 

Wake Forest College 525.00 $ 2,899.00 

Expenses: 

Salary and Travel — Horace Eason $ 6,018.51 

Postage, Committee Meetings, Additional Workers, Travel etc. 8,555.07 14,573.58 



Total Disbursements $ 17,472.58 

Balance December 31, 1947 19,821.72 



Total Accounted For $ 37,294.30 






CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS— FRUITLAND EXPANSION FUND 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 

Designations $ 5,000.00 

Balance December 31, 1946 4,000.00 

Total to Account For $ 9,000.00 

Balance December 31, 1947— Accounted For ; $ 9,000.00 



STATEMENT OF PRESENT FINANCIAL CONDITION 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Assets Available: 

Cash in Bank— Regular account S 268 , 097 . 88 

Cash in Bank — Biblical Recorder Building Fund Account . 175.26 

Cash in Bank — Charlotte Building Fund Account 1,465.53 

State Missions Reserve Fund — 

Wachovia Bank and Trust Company Trust Department 30,000.00 

Total Available Assets I 299,738.67 

Liabilities: 

Miss Ora Alford for 119 Hillsboro Street $ 60,000.00 

Secretary-Treasurer's Home Loan 1,200.00 

119 Hisllboro St. Loan 9,000.00 

For borrowed Money _ _ 40,000.00 

Due Southwide objects 174,005.63 

Total Liabilities 284,205.63 

Assets in Excess of Liabilities % 15,533.04 



BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, INCORPORATED 
CURRENT FUND INCOME AND EXPENSES 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Income: 

Churches, Sunday Schools, W. M.S.— Cash $ 462,102.69 

Churches, Sunday Schools, W.M.S.— Food 13,432.65 

Churches, Sunday Schools, W.M.S.— Clothing 3 , 609 . 58 

Individuals — Cash for designated children 7, 611. 04 

Individuals— Cash for Special Gifts 46,282.76 

The Duke Endowment 19,124.30 

Interest — From Endowment Funds 16,627.04 

Interest— From Sundry Trusts 1,501.40 

Interest— Current Fund 7,521.25 

Dividends and Rent "l, 343. 30 

Collected Checks 492.40 

Profit from Print Shop and Charity and Children 16, 860.60 

Tola Income % 596,509.01 

Expense: 

Maintenance Costs: 

Mills House ._ $ 358,479.44 

Kennedy Home 151,424.21 

Extra Institutional Service. 29,256.47 

Annuities Paid 4, 754 . 78 

Total Expenses 543,914.90 

Excess of Income over Expenses $ 52, 594 . 1 1 



of North Carolina 173 



BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA, INCORPORATED 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION 
December 31, 1047 
Assets: 

Plant and Equipment— Capital Fund $ 805,699.57 

Current Fund— Cash — Bonds — Inventories, ete 776,852.06 

Endowment Fund— Czsh— Bonds- Mortgages, ete 911,920.37 



Total Assets $2,494,472.00 



Net Worth 12, 494, 472. 00 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITAL- INC., 
WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 
BALANCE SHEET 
Assets: December 31, 1947 

Current Fund: 

Cash . $ 41,813.55 

Accounts Receivable 182,322.65 

Notes Receivable 113,000.00 

Due from Duke Endowment 17,713.00 

Supplies and Materials 50, 196.68 

Prepaid Insurance 4,718.91 

U.S. Securities-.. 796,25 



Total Current Fund Assets $ 410.561,04 

Building and Plant Fund: 

Cash... $ 17,688.16 

Securities Owned 34, 837 . 50 

Land, Building and Equipment $1,513,762.29 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 366,871.50 1,146.890.79 



Total Building and Plant Fund Assets 1,199,416.45 

Endowment Fund: 
Investments 2,225.95 



Total Assets $1,613,203.44 



Liabilities: 
Current Fund: 

Accounts Payable _ $ 115.00 

Reserve Surgical Fund 7,004.96 

Surplus 403,441.08 $ 410,561.04 

Building and Plant Fund: 

Account Payable.. $ 4,520.37 

Due Current Fund 113,000.00 

Reserves 47. 459 . 6 1 

Net Worth 1,034,436.47 1,199,416.45 

Endowment Fund: 
Net Worth. 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST HOSPITAL, INC. 

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C. 

INCOME AND EXPENSES 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 

Income: 

From Patients $ 820,026.50 

Non-operating Income 185,700.17 $1,005,726.67 



Expenses: 

Operating Expense 1,011,332.55 

Non-operating Expense 6,979.72 1,018,312.27 



Net Loss $ 12,585.60 



BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

BALANCE SHEET 

December 31, 1947 

Cash $ 25.00 

Returned Checks 70.59 

Accounts Receivable 26, 53 1.71 

Merchandise Inventory 41, 573 . 69 

Furniture and Fixtures $ 5,334.42 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation". 3,356.43 1,977.99 



Total Assets $ 70,178.98 



174 Baptist State Convention 



Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable-. ...J 625.00 

Net Worth 69,553.98 



Total Liabilities and Net Worth » 70,178.! 



PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 

Siles $ 225,136.11 

Cost of Sales 142,943.05 



Gross Profit on Sales $ 82,193.06 

Other Income 359.83 



Total Income ..$ 82,552.89 

Operating Expenses 46,330.84 



Net Income I 36,222.05 

BIBLICAL RECORDER BUILDING FUND 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 
Receipts: 
Rents: 

Baptist Book Store $ 1,919.40 

Baptist State Convention 2,023.00 

Biblical Recorder 879.60 

Bynum Printing Company 3,240.00 

Kings Bindery 615.00 

Apartment at Secretary-Treasurer Home 967.50 

119 Hillsboro Street 1,666.00 

120 W. Morgan Street 339.00 $ 11,649.50 



Biptist Book Store— Profit 14,008.81 

Loan— Wachovia Bank and Trust Co 10,000.00 

Other Receipts 2,797.96 

Total Receipts S 38,456.27 

Balance December31, 1946 1,188.44 



Total to Account For % 39,644.71 



Disbursements: 

Operating Expenses — Biblical Recorder Building $ 6, 977. 26 

Paid on Biblical Recorder Building Indebtedness 6, 000 . 00 

Paid Interest on Building Indebtedness 106,75 

Paid for Repairs, Taxes, etc., on Secretary-Treasurer Home 1, 115.76 

Paid on Indebtedness on Secretary-Treasurer Home 6,150.00 

Paid Interest on Indebtedness on Secretary-Treasurer Home 141.00 

Remodeling and operations — 119 Hillsboro St 8,507.05 

Paid 119 Hillsboro St. Indebtedness 7,625.00 

Paid Legal Fees and Interest on 119 Hillsboro St. Indebtedness 2,846.63 



Total Disbursements $ 39,469.45 

Balance December31, 1947 175.26 

Total Accounted For $ 39,644.71 

CHARLOTTE BUILDING FUND 

CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

12 Months Ended December 31, 1947 

Loan— Union National Bank $ 5,000.00 

Transferred from State Mission Fund 35,700.00 

Twelfth Step Service— Rent _ 278.85 

W. F. Enlargement Campaign— Rent 80.00 

Charlotte Book Store— Rent 1,200.00 



Total Receipts— To Account For $ 42,258.85 

Disbursements: 

Interest in Advance on Loan $ 150.00 

Architectural Service 1,100.00 

Remodeling— General- __ 21,672.96 

Plumbing and Heating 3, 112. 50 

Electrical Work 4,955.29 

New Furniture 380. 80 

BookStore 9,421. 77 

Total Disbursements $ 40,793.32 

Balance December 31, 1947 1,465.53 

Total Accounted For - f 42,258.85 



STATISTICS 
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Compiled by 
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Statistical Secretary 



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of North Carolina 265 

STATISTICAL REPORT OF ALL ASSOCIATIONS 



Associations 



Baptise Hjnjjr 



Alexander 

Alleghany 

Anson 

Ashe 

Atlantic 

Avery 

Beulah 

Bladen 

Blue Ridge 

Brier Creek 

Brunswick 

Brushy Mountain.. 

Buncombe 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Carolina 

Catawba River 

Chowan 

Columbus 

Dock 

Eastern 

Elkin 

Flat River 

French Broad 

Gaston County 

Green River 

Haywood 

Johnston 

Kings Mountain 

Liberty 

Little River 

Macon County 

Mecklenburg 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Mount Zion 

Neuse 

New Found 

New South River 

Pee Dee... 

Piedmont 

Pilot Mountain 

Raleigh 

Randolph 

Roanoke 

Robeson 

Rowan 

Sandy Creek 

Sandv Run 

South Fork .. . 

South Mountain 

South Yadkin 

Stanly 

Stone Mountain 

Stony Fork _ 

Surry 

Tar River 

Tennessee River 

Three Forks 

Transylvania 

Tuckaseigee 

Union 

West Chowan 

West Liberty 

Western North Carolina 

Wilmington 

Yadkin 

Yancey 



Total-; 



199 
32 
44 
282 
279 
212 
183 
144 
338 
264 
137 
191 
609 
520 
624 
372 
384 
396 
388 
88 
316 
146 
247 
278 
895 
297 
•356 
323 
689 
359 
370 
253 
872 
275 
102 

1,088 
206 
169 
500 
342 

1,262 
900 
844 
318 

1,007 
429 
283 
474 
686 
588 
149 
325 
194 
127 
40 
384 
476 
204 
272 
198 
359 
491 
390 
169 
344 
648 
286 
204 



Church 

Member- 
Ship 



6,832 
721 
1,715 
5,228 
4,935 
3,253 
6,149 
4,398 
5,646. 
6,663 
2,820 
6,796 

18.356 
9,742 

14,032 

10,445 
7,691 

14,349 
8,801 
1,324 
7.622 
4,230 
8,965 
7,508 

17,981 
7,290 
8,577 
9,916 

17,585 
8,090 
7,932 
5,614 

17,614 
5,878 
3,978 

26,718 
4,180 
3,725 

10.407 
7,590 

21,507 

23,557 

25,698 
5,181 

20,211 

14,424 
7,995 
9,887 

15,457 

1 1 , 925 
3,877 
8,568 
8,445 
3,437 
1,640 
9068 

14,927 
6,171 
7,280 
4,415 
7,533 
10,920 
16.365 
3,401 
6 . 654 
10,795 
6.644 
5,148 



Total 
Local Church 
Contributions 

(Pastor's 
Salary, etc.) 



71,450.16 

8,660.99 

32,330 29 

25,330.39 

105.774.16 

20,935 35 

94,463.10 

57,985 98 

96,600.74 

43,377.82 

34,454 98 

107,672.50 

400,526 20 

270,074.11 

231,286.22 

165,924.66 

209.228.23 

188,649.63 

120,214 71 

26,422.29 

116,921.00 

76.971 71 

82,187.59 

56,241.75 

607,706.93 

128,467.85 

176,398 44 

150,699 13 

371,497.64 

154,259.52 

123,665.49 

50.335.20 

571,190.00 

59,082.11 

62,708.97 

697,472 99 

74,239.92 

21,975 73 

182,472.13 

178,677.02 

551,187.24 

485,748.83 

429,066 05 

136,531.57 

406,570.02 

216,184.19 

182.207.30 

174,021.16 

264,251.31 

333,695.15 

83,860.41 

193.704.35 

209,069.08 

18,534.01 

5,084.96 

102,366 08 

192,185.33 

32,197.12 

66.122.85 

55,097.54 

46,252 42 

135,123.55 

183,425 66 

1S.4S3.10 

. r )2.830.7S 

253, 95H 47 

54.434.24 

29,446.18 



Total 
Denomi- 
national 
Contributions 



9,996.78 

1,091.79 

1,764.05 

5,605.36 

26,878.54 

2,967 88 

20,401.66 

17,870.70 

18,870.11 

3,955.48 

7.827.11 

12,714.58 

84, 730.41 

61,374.59 

36,991.77 

29.809.10 

40,628.59 

55,906 81 

27,411.99 

1,412.75 

31,444.00 

9,443.72 

35,358.04 

13,055.53 

151,852.57 

32,223.27 

24,304.16 

32,309.73 

181,413.44 

45,356.30 

30,365.26 

10,101.86 

177,178.00 

9,641.61 

10,977.11 

187,394.09 

31,137.39 

1,438.40 

47,383.85 

46,353.32 

164,725.34 

193,947.46 

141.433.93 

23,710.67 

117,392.13 

85,752.77 

49,692.72 

38,757.34 

68,397.48 

91,727.32 

6,586.59 

42,867.83 

36.033.29 

1,055.67 

1,163 86 

18,137 49 

48,574 65 

4,581.59 

13,497 83 

10,923.29 

6,638.29 

29.450 57 

82,313 85 

955 . 30 

11,143 53 

70,253 SO 

14,093.23 

6,804.43 



Grand Total 

(Add Last 

Two Columns) 



81,446.94 

9,752.78 

34,094.34 

30,935.75 

132,652.70 

23.903.23 

114,864.76 

75,856.68 

115,470.85 

47,333.30 

42,282.09 

120, 387. OS 

485,256.61 

331,448.70 

268,277.99 

195,733.76 

249,856.82 

244,556.44 

147,626.70 

27,835.04 

148,365.00 

86,415 43 

117,545.63 

69,297.28 

759,559.50 

160,691.13 

200,702.60 

183,008.86 

552.911,08 

199,615.82 

154,030.75 

60,437.00 

748,368.00 

68,723.72 

73,686.08 

884,867.08 

105,377.31 

23,414.13 

229,855.98 

225,030 34 

715,912 58 

679,696 29 

570,499.98 

160,242 24 

523,962.15 

301,936 96 

231,900.02 

212,778.50 

332,648 79 

425,422.47 

90,447.00 

236,572.18 

245,102 37 

19,589.68 

6,248.82 

120,503.57 

240,759.98 

36,778 71 

79,620.68 

66.020 S3 

52,890 71 

164,574.12 

264,739 51 

19,438 40 

63,974.31 

324,212 27 

68,527 47 

36,250.61 



322.426 IS 11.165,172.58 $ 2.957,553.95 8 14,122,726.54 



INDIAN ASSOCIATIONS- 


— ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Burnt Swamp 


476 
61 


27 
13 


3,858 
1,291 


38,068.92 
10,008.67 


2,781.34 
438.45 


40,850.26] 
10,447.12 




Totals 


537 


40 


5,149 


$ 48,077.59 


$ 3,219.79 


* 51,297.38 



266 



Baptist State Convention 



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18 



274 Baptist State Convention 

STATISTICAL SUMMARY, 1947 
L. L. Morgan, Secretary 

This is my twelfth annual report as Statistical Secretary. These 
reports are based on the associational year and the financial figures 
are not the same as those based on the calendar year reported by 
our Convention treasurer. 

There are sixty-eight white associations and two Indian associa- 
tions as associate members of the Convention. 

This has been, in many respects, the greatest year in the history 
of our Convention. Comparing our record for 1947 with 1946 and 
other years we have had substantial gains in most every phase of our 
work. 

Church Membership 

There are 2,781 churches with a combined membership of 622,426. 
This represents a gain of 41 churches and 25,435 members or a little 
more than four per cent gain. There are 40 Indian churches with 
a membership of 5,149. 

Baptisms 

During the year we have received 25,830 members by baptism. 
This is again of 1,708 compared with 1946 figures. The number of 
churches reporting no baptisms increased from 504 to 507. Forty 
Indian churches reported 537 baptisms, a gain of 360. 

Gifts 

Gifts to all missions, education, and benevolences amounted to 
$2,957,554 which is a gain of 150,798 or 5.4 per cent. For all local 
work, such as debts, buildings, fuel, lights, pastoral support, and 
other operating expenses, the sum given was $11,165,173. This 
represents a gain over last year of $2,182,618, or 24.4 per cent. 
The total of all gifts to all causes was $14,122,727. This is a gain 
over last year of $2,333,416 or 19.8 per cent. 

Cooperating Churches 

The number of churches contributing to denominational objects 
was 2,642. This is a gain of 37 churches. Thirty-nine churches failed 
to give to one or more objects fostered by the Convention. Last 
year there were 135 churches that failed to give to one or more 
objects of the Convention. 

Per Capita Gift 

The per capita gift to denominational objects for 1946 was $4.07; 
in 1947 it was $4.75. The per capita gift to local objects for 1946 
was $15.05; in 1947 it was $17.94. The per capita gift to all objects, 
local and denominational, for 1946 was $19.75. In 1947 it was 
$22.69. 

Sunday Schools.. 

There are 2,781 churches of which 2,747 have Sunday schools. 
Thirty-four churches reported no Sunday schools. There are 20 
mission schools, making a total of 2,767 Sunday schools with a 
membership of 467,486. This is a net gain of 44 schools and 29,831 
members compared with last year's figures, or about 6.6 per cent. 
There are 35 Indian Sunday schools with a membership of 4,120. 
Leonard L. Morgan is Secretary of the Sunday School Department; 
Mrs. Myra S. Motley, Associate Secretary; and Miss Gaynelle Sparks, 
Office Secretary. The office is located in the Biblical Recorder 
Building, Raleigh. 



of North Carolina 275 

Vacation Bible School 

There are 2,781 churches in North Carolina and 1,665 conducted 
Vacation Bible Schools. Last year we reported 1,257 which is a 
gain of 408. We went beyond our goal of 1,500 schools. This work 
is promoted by our Sunday School Department with Mrs. Myra S. 
Motley in charge. 

Training Union 

In the 2,781 churches, 1,066 report Training Unions, with a mem- 
bership of 73,438. This is a gain of 12,397 members over last year. 

In addition to this, nine Indian churches reported a membership 
of 647. Harvey T. Gibson is Secretary of the Department; Mr. L. J. 
Newton is Associational and Young People's worker; Miss Ruth 
Miller, Intermediate worker; Miss Martha Jane Mitchell, Junior 
worker; and Miss Mary Lou Wall is office secretary. The offices 
are located in the Biblical Recorder Building, Raleigh. 

Woman's Missionary Union 

Woman's Missionary Union report runs from January 1 to Decem- 
ber 31 and 1947 reports cannot be compiled before this annual of 
the North Carolina Convention goes to press; therefore, the figures 
below are for 1946. In 1946 there were 4,427 organizations of 
Woman's Missionary Union reporting. The roll is revised each year 
and when no report is sent during the year the organization is 
dropped from the roll until it does report. The membership in 
these organizations totaled 90,340. Organized work was done in 
sixty-seven associations, sixty-five holding an annual meeting separ- 
ate from the general association. Five thousand one hundred fity- 
three classes were held. The 1946 Heck Memorial offering was 
$25,058.42. Total contributions for the year were $827,480.09. This 
was a gain over the previous year of $184,398 or 26.6 per cent. 

Officers at present: Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, president; Miss Ruth 
Provence, Executive Secretary; Ora Afford, office secretary and 
Treasurer; Rev. B. W. Jackson, Royal Ambassador Secretary; Miss 
Hilda Mayo, Young People's Secretary; Mrs. John Wacaster, field 
representative. Offices 119 Hillsboro, Raleigh, N. C. 

Associations Leading 

In Number of Churches: 

Pilot Mountain, 80; Roanoke, 78; Mt. Zion, 70; Raleigh, 69; Bun- 
combe 66; Tar River, 61; Piedmont, 61; Robeson, 60; Chowan, 60; 
West Chowan, 58; Surry, 58; Carolina, 56; Ashe, 55; Sandy Run, 
55; New South River, 54; Sandy Creek, 54; Caldwell, 54; and Kings 
Mountain, 54. 

In Baptisms: 

Piedmont, 1,262; Mt. Zion, 1,088; Roanoke, 1,007; Pilot Mountain, 
900; Gaston County, 895; Mecklenburg, 872; Raleigh, 844; Kings 
Mountain, 689; Sandy Run, 686; Wilmington, 648; Caldwell, 624. 

In Sunday School Membership: 

Mt Zion, 21,438; Piedmont, 19,257; Pilot Mountain, 19,176; Ra- 
leigh, 17,855; Gaston County, 16,709; Mecklenburg, 16,062; Roanoke, 
15,887; Brushy Mountain, 14,072; Kings Mountain, 13,874; South 
Fork, 11,622; Robeson, 11,473; Sandy Run, 10,338; West Chowan, 
10,047. 



276 Baptist State Convention 

In Denomirtational Contributions: 

Pilot Mountain, $193,947.46; Mt. Zion, $187,394.09; Kings Moun- 
tain, $181,413.44; Mecklenburg, $177,178.00; Piedmont, $164,725.34; 
Gaston County, $151,852.57; Raleigh, $141,433.93; Roanoke, $117,- 
392.13. 

In Local Contributions: 

Mt. Zion, $697,472.99; Gaston County, $607,706.93; Mecklenburg, 
$571,190.00; Buncombe, $400,526.20; Piedmont, $551,187.24; Pilot 
Mountain, $485,748.83; Raleigh, $429,066.05; Roanoke, $406,570.02; 
Kings Mountain, $371,497.64; South Fork, $333,695.15; Cabarrus, 
$270,074.11; Sandy Run, $264,251.31; Wilmington, $253,958.47; 
Caldwell, $231,286.22. 

In Contributions to all Causes: 

Mt. Zion, $884,867.08; Gaston County, $759,559.50; Mecklenburg, 
$748,368.00; Piedmont, $715,912.58; Pilot Mountain, $679,696.29; 
Raleigh, $570,499.98; Kings Mountain, $552,911.08; Roanoke, $523,- 
962.15; Buncombe, $485,256.61; South Fork, $425,422.47; Cabarrus, 
$331,448.70; Wilmington $324,212.27. 



of North Carolina 



277 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



Associations and Superintendents 



Alleghany— Mrs. R. E. Richardson, Whitehead 

Alexander — Miss Marcella Hines, Hiddenite 

Ashe — Mrs. Ralph Parsons, West Jefferson 

Atlantic — Mrs. John Lashlev, Morehead City 

Avery— Miss Edith Cardwell, Elk Park . _ 

Beulah— Mrs. S. 0. Garrett, Semora 

Bladen— Mrs, R. J. Hall, Bladenboro 

Blue Ridge— Mrs. C. C. Parker, Marion 

Brier Creek — Mrs. Jim Parks, Union Grove 

Brunswick — Mrs. Martin B. Robbing, Winnabow 

Brushy Mountain— Mrs. Gilbert Foster, N. Wilkesboro. 

Buncombe — Mrs. Tom Walter, Ridgecrest 

Burnt Swamp — Miss Annie Mae Locklear, Pembroke 

Cabarrus — Mrs. R. W. Bailes, Kannapolis 

Caldwell— Mrs. C. A. Bowman, Granite Falls 

Carolina— Mrs. M. K. Sinclair, East Flat Rock 

Catawba River— Mrs. Jeff Burns, Valdese 

Chowan— Mrs. T. Sloane Guy, Sr., Gatesville 

Columbus— Mrs. J. Warren Cook. Whiteville 

Dock—... 



Eastern — Mrs. Grover Britt, Clinton. __ 

Elkin— Mrs. Roscoe Wood, North Wilkesboro 

Flat River— Mrs. W. D. Poe, Oxford 

French Broad— Mrs. W. L. Robinson, Mars Hill 

Gaston — Mrs. M. L. Barnes, Gastonia 

Green River — Mrs. John L. Geer, Rutherfordton 

Haywood— Mrs. John Blalock, Hazelwood 

Johnston— Mrs. J. E. Wilder, Raleigh 

King's Mountain— Mrs. W. P. Biggerstaff, Shelby 

Libert} — Mrs. P. M. Hendricks, Lexington 

Little River — Mrs. D. B. Andrews, Fuquay Springs.. . 

Macon — Mrs. Henry D. West, Franklin 

Mecklenburg — Mrs. V. G. Roberts, Charlotte 

Mitchell— Mrs. N. G. Pittman, Spruce Pine 

Montgomery— Mrs. W. I. Farrell, Troy 

Mount Zion — Mrs. Geo. N. Harward, Chapel Hill 

Neuse— Mrs. C. M. Billings, Dudley 

New South River— Mrs. W. D. Early, Roseboro 

Pee Dee — Mrs. W. M. Dempsey, Rockingham 

Piedmont — Mrs. W. C. Adkinson, Greensboro 

Pilot Mountain — Miss Ora Motsinger, Winston-Salem. 

Raleigh — Mrs. Dennis Larkins, Raleigh 

Randolph — Mrs. Guy F. Lane, Ramseur 

Roanoke — Mrs. Chas. R. Daniel, Weldon 

Robeson — Mrs. J. G. Stephens, Lumberton 

Rowan — Mrs. J. M. Gupton, Salisbury 

Sandy Creek — Mrs. Colin Churchill, Siler City 

Sandy Run — Mrs. Terry Smart, Forest City 

South Fork — Mrs. L. P. Frans, Hickory 

South Mountain — Mrs. J. 0. Summerlin, Morganton.. 

South Yadkin— Mrs. W. M. Moore, Statesville 

Stanly — Mrs. J. A. Seymour, Albemarle 

Stone Mountain — Mrs. Winfrey Luffman, State Road.. 

Surry — Miss Elizabeth Norman, Dobson 

Tar River— Mrs. J. A. White, Littleton 

Tennessee River — Mrs. Blanche Anders, Bryson City.- 

Three Forks — Mrs. H. K. Middleton. Sherwood 

Translyvania — Mrs. S. F. McAuley, Brevard 

Tuckaseigee — Mrs. B. S. Hensley, Sylva 

Union — Mrs. John A. Bivens, Wingate 

West Chowan — Mrs. Julian Porter, Severn 

West Liberty— Mrs. J. N. Patterson, Suit 

Western N. C. — Mrs. C. T. Almond, Andrews.. 

Wilmington — Mrs. William Brice, Wallace 

Yadkin— Mrs. W. E. Brooks, Boonville 

Yancey— Mrs. A. Z. Jamerson, Burnsville 

Cherokee — Mrs. J. J. Johnson, Cherokee 



Number 
Societies 



8 
43 
12 
57 
3 

93 
52 
37 
8 
40 
41 

103 
55 
84 
50 
42 
67 

163 
67 



Totals. 



79 

16 

87 

33 

155 

47 

47 

97 

93 

101 

74 

15 

103 

11 

30 

203 

32 

87 

81 

129 

141 

162 

40 

169 

141 

44 

77 

89 

92 

10 

72 

75 



Member- 
ship 



34 

126 

9 

28 

19 

25 

55 

204 



4,312 



Contri- 
butions 



S4 
234 
131 

1 , 040 
5 

1.356 
720 
413 
128 
270 
692 

1,685 
723 

1,214 
900 
562 
898 

2,836 
985 



1,354 

333 

1,770 

737 

2,573 

677 

805 

1,807 

1,823 

1,368 

1,599 

273 

3,220 

105 

463 

4,871 

923 

1,728 

1,748 

3,104 

4,154 

4,085 

607 

4,020 

2,959 

1,031 

1,453 

1,541 

1,347 

171 

668 

1,522 



560 

1,847 

140 

349 

206 

465 

1,143 

3.342 



363 

1,692 

621 

190 



80,633 



P 245.49 

923.65 

229.55 

10,578.11 

217.31 

10.289.50 

5,719.14 

2,909.05 

274.84 

1,728.32 

3,177.69 

23,905.42 

803 . S3 

14,902.59 

9,707.40 

5,680.75 

8,754.13 

19.042.09 

6,105.94 

9.78 

11,814.07 

3,160.51 

11,769.57 

3,571.29 

46,638.01 

9,175.35 

6,109.35 

9,371.42 

20,149.49 

14,963.52 

12,168.78 

1,817.10 

42,297.49 

2,115.93 

2,330.41 

55,805.66 

11,426.20 

12,861.31 

17,044.58 

51,770.46 

52,601.17 

50,778.34 

4,974.44 

42,958.67 

25,395.39 

11,393.84 

11,135.78 

9,127.27 

18,779.95 

291.32 

17,550.25 

11,763.56 

23.00 

4,041.15 

10,715.08 

164.74 

2,034.20 

1,944.72 

1,518.94 

6,063.18 

36,112.79 

36.85 

3,064.86 

23,523.81 

3,309.42 

855.37 

19.00 

S821.742.17 



278 Baptist State Convention 



NORTH CAROLINA MISSIONARIES ON FOREIGN FIELDS 

Appointed 

Rev. W. C. Newton, Hwanghsien, China (retired) 1903 

Mrs. Maude Burke Dozier, Hawaii.. 1906 

Mrs. Mary Bryson Tipton, Shanghai, China (retired) 1909 

Charles A. Leonard, Hawaii 1910 

J. B. Hipps, Chungking, China.. 1913 

H. H. McMillan, Shoochow, China.. 1913 

Mrs. Leila Memory McMillan, Shoochow, China..... 1913 

Miss R. Pearle Johnson, Shanghai, China 1915 

Mrs. T. J. League, Kweiteh, China (retired). 1916 

A. R. Gallimore, Waichow, China (retired) .. 1918 

J. C. Powell, Shaki, Africa .. 1919 

Mrs. Rosa Hocutt Powell, Shaki, Africa 1919 

Miss Alda Grayson, Laichowfu, China 1921 

Miss Katie Murray, Chengchow, China 1922 

John A. Abernathy, Chungking, China... , 1924 

Frank T. N. Woodward, China 1924 

William B. Johnson, Kunshan, China 1925 

Miss Marjorie Spence, Temuco, Chile.. 1925 

A. S. Gillespie, Kaifeng, China..... 1931 

Mrs. Pauline Pittard Gillespie, Kaifeng, China 1931 

Mrs. Edwin B. Dozier, Hawaii 1933 

Miss Elizabeth Hale, Shanghai, China.... 1934 

Shelby W. Vance, Yungchow, China- 1935 

Lucius Bunyan Olive, Chingkiang, China.. 1920 

Mrs. Nell Fowler Olive, Chingkiang, China 1920 

William Dewey Moore, Rome, Italy 1937 

Miss Vivian Estelle Nowell, Nigeria, Africa... 1938 

Lonnie Edwood Blackman, Hawaii... 1922 

Mrs. Gladys Yates Blackman, Hawaii __ 1922 

Mrs. Mary Mills Dyer, China 1940 

Miss Viola Campbell, Mexico. ._ 1942 

Miss Estelle Councilman, Argentina 1943 

Ray P. Ingram, Africa... 1944 

Mrs. Doris Thompson McGee, Africa... 1945 

John Sidney McGee, Africa ^...1945 

Bertie Lee Kendrick, Hawaii... .1945 

Sarah Rebecca Eddinger, Chile... ; 1945 

Frances Talley, Japan 1946 

Benjamin Ray Lawton, Italy .1947 

James Palmer Kirk, Brazil 1947 

Mrs. Barbara Williams Deal, Colombia s 1947 

Miss Lucy Ernelle Brooks, Nigeria, Africa... "...1947 



of North Carolina 



279 



MINISTERIAL AND TRAINING SCHOOL STUDENTS 

FROM NORTH CAROLINA AT OUR COLLEGES 

AND SEMINARIES 

CAMPBELL JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Buie's Creek 



Adams, Randall, Vanceboro 
Baisley, Harold L., Fayetteville 
Beasley, W. D., Four Oaks 
Bray, Charles E., Reidsville 
Caldwell, Frank, Charlotte 
Daugherty, Guilford, New Bern 
Ensley, Eugene C, Wilmington 
Hinton, Russell L., Sharpsburg 
Holden, Emory, Wilmington 
Johnson, Lennox A., Wilmington 
Kittrell, C. T., Dunn 



Longmire, Robt. C, Henderson 
Land, Augustus W., Wilmington 
Phillips, John W., Raleigh 
Poe, David, Siler City 
Pope, Ho vie W., Wilmington 
Pulliam, Edward, Semora 
Stallings, Alpheus, Raleigh 
Tyner, Wayne, Pembroke 
Wellons, Charles, Kinston 
White, Thos. W., Elizabeth City 
Woody, John W., Oxford 



GARDNER-WEBB JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Boiling Springs 



Anderson, Charles Richard, 

Gastonia 
Archer, Kenneth Lee, Cornelius 
Bishop, James Edgar, 

Mooresville 
Bridges, Joe Jasper, Shelby 
Brown, Jack Bruce, 

Winston-Salem 
Brown, Roy Franklin, Landis 
Burgin, Mack A., Boiling Springs 
Carter, Elmer P., Boiling Springs 
Comer, Paul H., Winston-Salem 
Crisp, Fred Carroll, Gastonia 
Dudley, Robert Pete, Shelby 
Falls, Jackson Lattimore, 

Belwood 
Fulbright, Charles T., Icard 
Goble, Harry Anderson, Gastonia 
Greene, Dewey Hicks, Spindale 
Greene, Robert Clyde, 

Rutherfordton 
Grigg, Robert Brantley, Gastonia 
Hancock, Lewis Earl, Shelby 
Hardin, Newton R. N., 
Boiling Springs 
Hardin, Robert Lee, Belmont 
Harper, Alvin E., Boiling Springs 
High, Clyde Franklin, Dallas 
Holland, Clifford Lewis, 

Robbinsville 
Holland, Jack Rufus, Hickory 
Hutchins, Guy Edward 

Winston-Salem 
Jenkins, Clifford Cyrus, Gastonia 
Kendrick, Olen Lawson, 

Boiling Springs 



Kinnaman, John P., Kernersville 
Lineberger, T. Alfred, Dallas 
Long, John W., Gastonia 
McMahan, James I., 

Rutherfordton 
McMurray, Bobo C, Cliffside 
Miller, Charles S., Jefferson 
Monroe, Woodrow F., Shelby 
Morefield, George Edward, 

Salisbury 
Morris, David N., Gastonia 
Norris, Page Edsel, Todd 
Norville, James M., Spindale 
Oxford, Charles Earl, Morganton 
Rhodes, Joe C, Hendersonville 
Shaw, Charles Allen, Shelby 
Singley, Ambrose J., 

Boiling Springs 
Snyder, Kenneth E., 

Boiling Springs 
Spurling, Yates M., Cliffside 
Starnes, James L., 

Boiling Springs 
Stevenson, Samuel O., Gastonia 
Sullivan, Marion R. V., Charlotte 
Whisenant, William D., 

Morganton 
Windham, Milton Eugene, 

Roxboro 
Yarborough, Charles Ray, 

Boiling Springs 
Hamrick, Audley G., 

Boiling Springs 
Holder, James Elmer, Mt. Airy 
Whitlock, Robert Kenneth, 

Candler 



280 



Baptist State Convention 



MARS HILL JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Mars Hill 



Askew, Kesler, Jr., Enfield 
Baker, Raleigh O., Charlotte 
Bowers, Frank N., Littleton 
Bumgarner, Wiley C, Canton 
Casner, Raymond, Charlotte 
Compton, Joseph B., Hazelwood 
Cox, Marcellus, South Port 
Daniel, Edward H., Oxford 
Davis, Elwood D., Lumberton 
Dobson, Ned T., Nebo 
Edmonds, Oscar S., Marshall 
Elliott, Edward C, Cherryville 
Favell, Clay H., Charlotte 
Pitts, James R., Siler City 
Fuller, William C, Charlotte 
Garner, Lloyd W., Charlotte 
Gaze, Theodore E., Asheville 
Greene, James E., Waynesville 
Gribble, Franklin S., Jr., 

Charlotte 
Hodge, Ray K., Kenly 
Hopkins, Ira B., Albemarle 
James, J. W., Jr., Winston-Salem 
Jackson, Donald R., Raleigh 
Jenkins, James E., Asheville 
Jones, Clifford G., Canton 
Knight, Howard C, Asheville 
Lambert. James M., Leaksville 



Lanning, Edward R., Lexington 
Lennon, Lynwood B., Boardman 
Long, Samuel D., Candler 
Mace, Jack H., Alexis 
Mehaffey, Ernest A., Leicester 
Minton, Dean L., 

North Wilkesboro 
Mumford, Carey G., Jr., Raleigh 
McAllister, John N., Raleigh 
Phillips, Hunter, Winston-Salem 
Porter, Earl N., Charlotte 
Propst, Charles C, Jr., Hickory 
Ray, Abraham V., Mebane 
Rhinehart, George C, Canton 
Rollins, Leonard L., Spindale 
Sells, Henry C, Salisbury 
Smith, Calvin T., Asheville 
Sumner, Joseph W., Jacksonville 
Teague, William N., Lexington 
Thornton, Spencer P., Charlotte 
Thornburg, William B., Gastonia 
Warren, Claude C, Roxboro 
West, Edgar P., Raleigh 
Whisnant, Jackson C, Hickory 
White, Raymond M., Belmont 
Woodbury, Carl T., Morganton 
Young, Donald C, Charlotte 



NEW ORLEANS BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



New Orleans, 

Crawford, Louise, West Hillsboro 
Grose, Blaine Harrison, 

Statesville 
Hodge, Albert H., Kenly 
Hodge, Mrs. Albert H., Charlotte 
Jolly, Seymour Woodrow, 

Whiteville 
Lloyd, Flora Imogene, Hillsboro 
Martin, Alyce, Wadesboro 
Medlock, Albert A., Gastonia 



Louisiana 

Meredith, Clyde R., 

West Asheville 
Meredith, Mrs. Clyde R., 

West Asheville 
Poole, Robert W., Statesville 
Swinson, James E., 

Winston-Salem 
Swinson, Mrs. James E., 

Winston-Salem 



SOUTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Adams, Walter Jarvis, Asheville 
Bailey, Arlan Alexander, 

Gastonia 
Bennett, George Willis, Candler 
Brittain, Nathaniel H., 

Ridgecrest 
Brock, Lonnie Ross, Jr., Raleigh 
Brown, Millard Ray, Asheville 
Bryan, Fulton Brewer, 

Hope Mills 



Campbell, Rexford Ray, 

Wake Forest 
Cannon, Ralph L., Stanley 
Carter, Samuel Felton, 

McLeansville 
Cashwell, Thomas Leary, Jr., 

Gastonia 
Chapman, Clyde David, Shelby 
Compton, Carl Everett, 

Greensboro 



of North Carolina 



281 



Connell, Raymond E., Kannapolis 
Crapps, Robert W., Hickory 
Deese, Frank Eugene, 

Kannapolis 
Early, Paul Davis, 

Winston-Salem 
Edwards, Robert Lee, 

Wake Forest 
Ellis, James Norman, Maiden 
Farrar, John Sherman, Jr., 

Gastonia 
Ford, Gerald Kenneth, Asheboro 
Freeman, Allen J., Salisbury 
Gilreath, Morgan B., Charlotte 
Gordon, Lewis Howard, Monroe 
Greene, Macon P., Champion 
Greene, Robert Thomas, Sr., 

Oxford 
Grogan, William McLean, 

Brevard 
Hamby, Robert Palmer, 

Swannanoa 
Hartsell, Bruce Victor, Valdese 
Hensley, Ralph Randolph, 

Asheville 
Hicks, John Grayson, Salisbury 
Hicks, Ronald Dewitt, 

Winston-Salem 
Hipps, Ferdinand Lorenzo, 
Hobbs, J. D., Jr., Wilmington 
Hoover, E. U., Wake Forest 
Howington, Nolan Patrick, 

Shelby 
Hughes, Archie Coleman, Shelby 
Humphrey, J. Edward, 

Lumberton 
Jones, George Alexander, Saluda 
Jones, Horace Eugene, 

Buie's Creek 
Killian, William Harold, 

Statesville 
Lawrence, John Elmore, 

Scotland Neck 



Lennon, John T., Wake Forest 
Lockhart, Isaac Rex, Hickory 
Mattox, James O., Wilson 
Mauney, James Herman, Shelby 
Morphis, Luther H., Lexington 
Pitt, Kermit Alvin, 

Roanoke Rapids 
Poston, Ernest Eugene, Shelby 
Potts, Rufus F., Dudley 
Ray, Michael Thomas, Kington 
Rhodes, Arnold Black, 

Rocky Point 
Robbins, Troy Garren, Reidsville 
Scott, M. Fred, Jr., Durham 
Sears, Vaudrey Washington, 

Concord 
Smith, William Thomas, Durham 
Southard, William Jackson, 

Leaksville 
Stewart, Elliot B., Hamilton 
Stewart, Raymond, Cheoah 
Stokes, Henry B., Winston-Salem 
Summey, Charles Ballard, Dallas 
Sykes, John Madison, Jr. 

Greensboro 
Troutman, Coit Ray, Jr., 

Charlotte 
Upchurch, Ernest Carl, 

Kings Mountain 
Wagoner, Walter R., 

Winston-Salem 
Walker, Luther Hilliard, Raleigh 
Watson, Emerson Cleveland, Jr., 

Ingold 
Watterson, Joseph Vardell, 

Broadway 
Wheeler, Ned, Jr., Asheville 
Whitaker, Bruce Garry Ezell, 

Shelby 
Young, James Oliver, Bakersville 
Zukor, Stephen Harry, 

Morganton 



NORTH CAROLINA STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF 
CHURCH MUSIC 



Howard Cates, Burlington 
Martha Eller Hicks, Salisbury 
Margaret Lewis Hodge, 
Rutherfordton 



Lillian Pope Howell, Enfield 
Larry Penley, Hickory 
Albertine Summey, Norwood 
Betty Anne Taylor, East Bend 



282 



Baptist State Convention 



SOUTHWESTERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Fort Worth, Texas 



Anderson, James Harold, 

Mars Hill 
Andrews, William P., Greensboro 
Andrews, Mrs. W. P., 

Greensboro 
Bell, Charles Roger, Gastonia 
Bell, Mrs. C. R., Gastonia 
Bingham, D. Y., Charlotte 
Bolch, G. Glynn, Asheville 
Bunn, James Charles, 

Spring Hope 
Carlton, Mary Eloise, Burgaw— 
Carlton, Howard H., Erlanger 
Carlton, Mrs. H. H., Lexington 
Cathey, H. R., Charlotte 
Cothran, Cecil W., Forest City 
Efird, T. J., Albemarle 
Ellis, Cline D., Spruce Pine 
Farrar, Charles W., Gastonia 
Fortner, Clifford D. } Kannapolis 
Fortner, Mrs. C. D., Kannapolis 
Goodwin, Caleb W., Jr., 

Morrisville 
Harris, Anne Richie, Raleigh 
Hendrix, W. T., Cramerton 
Hewett, William T., Wilmington 
Hilliard, R. Otho, Red Springs 



Hughes, Annie Pearl, Burlington 
Johnson, Gretchen, Magnolia 
Jones, Charles W., Raleigh 
Langley, Mrs. Ralph H., 

Statesville 
Lanier, W. L., Belmont 
Lanier, Mrs. W. L., Belmont 
Lee, Earl David, Greensboro 
Levan, J. W., Hiddenite 
Levan, Mrs. J. W., Hiddenite 
Long, W. Dewitt, Charlotte 
Long, Melba, Durham 
McCammon, Mrs. W. H., Jr., 

Durham 
Mclver, Clifford Bruce, 

Siler City 
Mauney, Fred A., Paw Creek 
Metts, Mrs. F. C, Asheville 
Middleton, Mary Sue, Raleigh 
Oliver, John S., Carthage 
Oliver, Mrs. John S., Carthage 
Padgett, W. W., Forest City. 
Price, E. W., Jr., Raleigh 
Robbins, Ronda E., Morganton 
Robbins, Mrs. R. E., Lenoir 
Wagner, Emilyn, Taylorsville 
White, Harold M., Windsor 



WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 



Wake Forest 



Ambrose, C. A., Asheville 
Auton, C. P., Wake Forest 
Baker, F. G., Winston-Salem 
Barnes, R. B., Charlotte 
Bass, R. E., Albemarle 
Bennett, H. C, Asheville 
Bennett, T. C, Winston-Salem 
Blanton, J. P., Teachey 
Blue, W. C, Bunn 
Bobbitt, P. R., Jr., Sanford 
Bridges, L., Wilmington 
Britt, D. M., Smithfield 
Bullard, M. E., Wake Forest 
Bunn, J. D., Fayetteville 
Bunn, J. T., Morehead City 
Bush, W. T., Roanoke Rapids 
Carter, J. F., Lowell 
Chamblee, L. B., Aulander 
Chaney, R. L., Raleigh 
Chapman, M. W., Fayetteville 
Conn, A. M., Wake Forest 
Cline, P. A., Jr., Gastonia 
Coggins, J. H., Rocky Mount 
Corn, J. E., Jr., Charlotte 



Cowsent, G. B., Wingate 
Creech, T. G., Princeton 
Crouch, W. H., Asheville 
Davis, C. C, Farmville 
Davis, W. R., Hendersonville 
Dowd, V. S., Knightdale 
Dunevant, J. C, Hurdle Mills 
Eure, A. J., Jr., Roduco 
Evans, Vivian W., Hertford 
Faircloth, T. C, Erwin 
Ferrell, N. R., Durham 
Field, W. A., Horse Shoe 
Fisher, R. M., Alexis 
Fitzgerald, W. C, Raleigh 
Fleet, J. B., Greensboro 
Flowers, F. D., Jr., Wake Forest 
Foushee, G. L., Moncure 
Funderburke, O., Wake Forest 
Gordon, B. M., Youngsville 
Hager, F. B., Huntersville 
Hall, C. F., Wilmington 
Hall, D. K., Hopeville 
Hardy, P. F., Wake Forest 
Hasty, J. F., Charlotte 



of North Carolina 



283 



Hodge, R. H., Raleigh 
Holland, J. T., Statesville 
Horton, C. A., Zebulon 
Hughes, L. W., Jr., Colerain 
James, R. E., Conway 
Johnson, E. W., Wake Forest 
Jones, W. L., Yanceyville 
Joyner, Norman, Mocksville 
Kincaid, E., Greensboro 
King, J. B., Charlotte 
Kinlaw, B. J., Raeford 
Knight, R. N., Columbia 
Knight, R. W., Durham 
Lamb, W. C, Elizabeth City 
Lewis, W. H., Wake Forest 
Little, Thurston, Freeland 
McSwain, T. L., Glen Alpine 
Marks, W. F., Lilesville 
Medlin, Boyce, Wake Forest 
Miller, D. R., Apex 
Miller, J. A., Lexington 
Mills, W. T., Apex 
Mills, A. H., Concord 
Mitchell, J. C, Morganton 
Moose, J. L. W., Statesville 
Morgan, H. A., Wake Forest 
Moyle, W. R., Charlotte 
Murphy, D. T., Wallace 
Murphy, M. E., Marshallburg 
Nanney, J. R., Jr., Spindale 
Napier, H. V., Polkton 
Nichols, H. I., Raleigh 
Orr, E. R., Rocky Mount 
Pearson, W. L., Jr., Asheville 
Pernell, James, Wake Forest 
Phipps, A. C, Rolesville 



Pledger, B. F., Conway 
Price, O. C. Ellenboro 
Pulliam, H. T., Roxboro 
Randall, H. R., Charlotte 
Robinson, W. C, Ellerbe 
Roe, H. D., Asheville 
Rogers, R. L., Wake Forest 
Sears, M. O., Cary 
Severance, W. M., Gastonia 
Sharp, C. E., Harrellsville 
Sharpe, C. M., Newton 
Simpson, W. H., Raleigh 
Smith, W. A., Raleigh 
Stanley, J. F., Ash 
Stapleton, G. T., Mars Hill 
Stevens, C. A., Smithfield 
Talbert, L. A., Wake Forest 
Teeter, J. M., Wake Forest 
Thomas, H. L., Spindale 
Thomas, L. M., Gastonia 
Trexler, R. L., Granite Quarry 
Underwood, D. D., Smithfield 
Vaughan, W. B., Hillsboro 
Waddell, G. W., Buie's Creek 
Wadford, D. L., Neuse 
Wall, V. E., Jr., Monroe 
Walker, Baxter, Fayetteville 
Weaver, C. C, Spring Hope 
Whitley, R. E., Raleigh 
Wilder, J. B., Wake Forest 
Wilhelm, R. D., Albemarle 
Williams, H., Morganton 
Williams, L. S., Wake Forest 
Winecoff, Robert, China Grove 
Woosley, R. W., Winston-Salem 



WINGATE JUNIOR COLLEGE 



WlNGATE 



Cartner, Hayden, Kannapolis 
Curlee, Melvyn, Oakboro 
Davis, John, Kannapolis 
Gales, Foley, Kannapolis 
Goodwin, L. E., Cordova 
Greenway, Ellis, Icard 
Haywood, M. L., Charlotte 
Helderman, L. F., Charlotte 
Helms, Calvin Floyd, Kannapolis 
Helms, J. B., Kannapolis 
Herren, Selva, Albemarle 
Hill, Arthur L., Hillsboro 
Musselwhite, Emory, Monroe 
Huggins, George W., Marsh ville 
Hunneycutt, D. E., Marsh ville 



Lake, J. Tillman, Wadesboro 
McLain, Maurice S., Kannapolis 
McQueen, Richard, Ellerbe 
Moorehead, W. R., Concord 
0'Briant ; Clarence, Bahama 
Paris, Charles N., Jr., Charlotte 
Robertson, James, Mooresville 
Sigmon, James M., Newton 
Simpson, B. Clyde, Indian Trail 
Simpson, J. Marvin, Kannapolis 
Staley, A. E., Albemarle 
Stikeleather, Thomas W., 

Charlotte 
Venters, Douglas A., Badin 
Williams, James B., Abner 



284 



Baptist State Convention 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION TRAINING SCHOOL 

Louisville, Kentucky 



Alexander, Libby, Stony Point 
Austin, Stella, Lenoir 
Bledsoe, Hilda, Winston-Salem 
Cannon, Mrs. Ralph, Stanley 
Ellis, Mrs. H. C, Mt. Gilead 
Frink, Kathleen, Bladenboro 
Gaskin, Erleen, Albemarle 
Grass, Wilma, Charlotte 
Hayworth, Elizabeth, 

Kernersville 
Highfill, Virginia, 

Winston-Salem 
Hiers, Vivian, Wilmington 
Hildebrand, Minnie, Hickory 
Hollis, Margaret, Laurinburg 



Howington, Mrs. N. P., 

Ellenboro 
Johnson, Clarine, Wilmington 
Lee, Mrs. Roy, Whiteville 
Mullinax, Betty, Asheville 
Mullis, Lounell, Harmony 
Reece, Augusta, Yadkinville 
Robbins, Mrs. Troy G., 

Reedsville 
Rogers, Zula, Lillington 
Snow, Laura Frances, Stanley 
Sowers, Texie, Lexington 
Stewart, Evelyn, Windsor 
Wagoner, Mrs. W. R., 

Winston-Salem 
Watterson, Mrs. J. V., Broadway 



of North Carolina 285 



EDUCATIONAL DIRECTORS— PASTOR'S ASSISTANTS- 
DIRECTORS OF YOUTH WORK— MINISTERS OF 
MUSIC — MINISTERS OF EDUCATION — 
FINANCIAL SECRETARIES 

Name — Address and Church 

Allen, J. W., Statesville, Front Street 

Allred, Miss Fay Carol, Shelby, Second 

Arrington, A. H., Raleigh, Hayes Barton 

Bagwell, Mrs. Elwood, Durham, First 

Banks, Charles A., Greensboro, First 

Beale, Miss Virginia, Kannapolis, First 

Bell, Fred L., Greensboro, College Park 

Berman, Mrs. Alice H., Charlotte, Myers Park 

Blackburn, Miss Elsie, Charlotte, Myers Park 

Blackwelder, James P., Belmont, First 

Blevins, Mrs. Gertrude G., Charlotte, Arlington 

Bowman, Miss Doris Gene, Raleigh, Calvary 

Bowman, Jerry, Fairmont, First 

Bramlett, Mrs. J. A., Waynesville, First 

Brietz, E. Raymond, Jr., Charlotte, Pritchard Memorial 

Brown, Miss Ethel, Sanford, First 

Carriker, C. L., Charlotte, Emmanuel 

Carroll, Miss Suzanne, Charlotte, Myers Park 

Coggin, C. Elwood, Fayetteville, First 

Collins, Mrs. D. L., Wilson, First 

Combs, Miss Mary Frances, Wilmington, First 

Cox, Mrs. W. M., Hendersonville, First 

Cronstedt, Carl, High Point, First 

Crowe, J. Marvin, Charlotte, First 

Crowell, Mrs. S. M., Lexington, First 

Davis, Miss Doris Jewell, Bessemer City, First 

Davis, Miss Jean, Roxboro, First 

Dodson, Miss Agnes, Winston-Salem, Ardmore 

Draughon, Miss Elizabeth, Durham, Edgemont 

Durst, John K., Asheville, First 

Edinger, Miss Lois, Charlotte, St. John's 

Elliott, Miss Dorothy, Kinston, First 

Eman, Miss Mary Van., Rockingham, First 

Emurian, Henri, Wilmington, First 

Fletcher, John C., Jr., Charlotte, Pritchard Memorial 

Fulgham, Mrs. Ethel M., Durham, Edgemont 

Funderburk, Miss Jetta, Winston-Salem, North 

Garren, Allard, Hendersonville, First 

Godwin, C. E., Rocky Mount, First 

Gower, Miss Gertrude, Charlotte, First 

Gordon, Miss Florence, Durham, Watts St. 

Gravlee, Miss Elizabeth, Lincolnton, First 

Grayson, Miss Katy Ruth, Winston-Salem, Ardmore 

Hair, Miss Josephine, Ahoskie, First 

Hair, Mrs. Nelle, Fayetteville, First 

Halsey, Miss Zenna, Marion, First 

Hamrick, Joe D., Shelby, First 

Harris, Miss Dorothy, Cherryville, First 

Harris, Miss Helen E., Morganton, First 

Harris, Harlan, Shelby, First 

Hayworth, Miss Elizabeth, Washington, First 

Holder, Gene, High Point, North Main St. 

Holmes, John D., Raleigh, Tabernacle 



286 Baptist State Convention 

Holtzclaw, Miss Marian, Asheville, First 

Howard, Miss Ethel, Raleigh, Tabernacle 

Hughes, Miss Josephine, Dunn, First 

Humphrey, Miss Lillian, New Bern, First 

Hutchens, Miss Elizabeth, Elizabeth City, Blackwell Memorial 

Jeffries, Mrs. J. D., Winston-Salem, Ardmore 

Jennings, Miss Mildred, Laurinburg, First 

Johnson, J. P., Fayetteville, Second 

Jones, C. D., Durham, Edgemont 

Jones, Eugene, Monroe, First 

Jones, Miss Helen, Hamlet, First 

Jones, Mrs. J. N., Asheville, First 

Kee, L. G., Morganton, Calvary 

Keller, Miss Ella, Hickory, First 

Kissiah, W. Edward, Charlotte, St. John's 

Knott, Miss Isabelle, Cliffside 

Kreeger, Miss Mae, Winston-Salem, Temple 

Lamb, Miss Marie, Raleigh, Tabernacle 

Lewis, Miss Willa Grey, High Point, First 

Loftin, Miss Dorothy, Lexington, First 

Lowe, Mrs. A. C, Greensboro, Asheboro St. 

McLean, Miss Agnes, Forest City, First 

Markham, Mrs. D. C, Durham, Edgemont 

Mauldin, Miss Edith, Albemarle, West 

Maynard, Johnny, Winston-Salem, Temple 

Miller, J. Grady, Winston-Salem, First 

Morgan, James P., Durham, First 

Morton, Mrs. Richard W., Greensboro, First 

Moss, Miss Mary Frances, Clinton, First 

Murray, Miss Elizabeth, Raleigh, Pullen Memorial 

Nichols, Miss Peggie, North Wilkesboro, First 

O'Quinn, Miss Bruce Ellen, Wilson, First 

Orem, Miss Kathryn, Monroe, First 

Ostrander, Ward. High Point, Green St. 

Overman, Miss Virginia, Raleigh, First 

Padgett, Miss Patricia, High Point, North Main St. 

Parks, Miss Margaret, Wilmington, First 

Patrick, Miss Thelma, High Point, First 

Patterson. Miss Mary Lena, Morganton, Calvary 

Petria, Miss Eyra Dell, Elkin, First 

Phillips, Miss Loretta, Forest City, Florence 

Poerschke, Robert E., Charlotte, Myers Park 

Porter, Miss Celeste, Raleigh, Hayes Barton 

Posey, Miss Sara, Lenoir, South 

Pressley, Miss Joyce A., Charlotte, First 

Proctor, Miss A. Lucille, Winston-Salem, Ardmore 

Ray, Mrs. Anne, Raleigh, Tabernacle 

Renn, Euticus, Charlotte, St. John's 

Riner, Miss Lucille, Kannapolis, First 

Roberson, William T., Salisbury, First 

Roberts, Miss Marie, Charlotte, First 

Roddick, Miss Katherine, Reidsville, First 

Ruppelt, Mrs. W. E., Charlotte, St. John's 

Saville, Mrs. Lloyd, Durham, Watts St. 

Scarlette, Miss Dora Page, Henderson, First 

Short, Mrs. Lauretta B., Charlotte, Myers Park 

Sliger, Kenneth, Charlotte, Enderly Park 

Sliger, M. E., Winston-Salem, Waughtown 

Stowe, Miss Dorothy, Spruce Pine, First 

Straughan, Miss Evelyn, Wilmington, Temple 



of North Carolina 287 

Stubbs, Frank L., Greensboro, First 

Sutton, Mrs. John, Concord, First 

Swann, Miss Dorothy, Statesville, First 

Teague, Miss Lula Mae, Kings Mountain, First 

Thomas, Miss Mildred, Asheville, First 

Thompson, Miss Mary Sue, Shelby, First 

Todd, Miss Jean, Durham, Bethesda 

Triplett, Mrs. O. E., North Wilkesboro, First 

Turner, Miss Elisabeth H., Morgariton, First 

Wacaster, Miss Margaret, Williamston, Memorial 

Wagoner, Mrs. Ruth, Asheville, First 

Wall, Woodrow, Asheville, First 

Warren, Mrs. J. B., Durham, Angier Avenue 

Washburn, Mrs. A. V., Goldsboro, First 

White, Claude, Durham, West 

Wilburn, Miss Carolyn, Newton, First 

Wilmer, Mrs. R. B., Raleigh, Hayes Barton 

Winstead, Miss Frances, Concord, First 

Zetty, Miss Lucille, Durham, First 

ASSOCIATIONAL MISSIONARIES 

Association — Missionary — Address 

Ashe, Miss Virginia Dare Teague, West Jefferson 

Beulah, Miss Ella Sue Gravitte, Roxboro, First Baptist Church 

Blue Ridge, Rev. Frank Robinson, Marion 

Brushy Mountain, Miss S. Madge Lewis, North Wilkesboro, Box 731 

Buncombe, Rev. H. M. Hocutt, Asheville, 112 Belmont Ave. 

Caldwell, Miss Elizabeth Campbell, Lenoir, 210 West Harper St. 

Carolina, Rev. E. V. Plemmons, Hendersonville, 206 Rose Bldg. 

Catawba River, Miss Louella Brown, Morganton, Box 568 

Chowan, Rev. D. P. Brooks. Elizabeth City, 113 Pritchard St. 

Eastern, Rev. Gilmer J. Beck, Warsaw 

Flat River, Rev. Roger Williams, Oxford, Box 307 

French Broad, Rev. David B. Roberts, Marshall, Route 2 

Green River, Rev. Oren Bradley, Rutherfordton, Star Route 

Haywood, Miss Daphne Boone, Waynesville, 57 Main St. 

Johnston, Rev. N. A. Catlett, Clayton 

Kings Mountain, Rev. Lewis E. Ludlum, Shelby, Box 534 

Liberty, Rev. W. V. Carroll, Lexington, Route 3 

Mecklenburg, Rev. Boyd P. Milburn, Charlotte, 211 V 2 N. Tryon St. 

Mt. Zion, Rev. W. L. Lynch, Durham, 511 Snow Bldg. 

Neuse, Rev. E. S. Morgan, Kinston, Kennedy Home 

New Found, Rev. Canada A. Worley, Barnard 

New South River, Rev. W. B. Guthrie, Fayetteville, 122% Bryan 
Bldg. 

Piedmont, Rev. T. L. Sasser, Greensboro, Box 2249 

Pilot Mountain, Rev. Walter L. Warfford, Winston-Salem, 300 Lock- 
land Ave. 

Raleigh, Rev. Dennis M. Larkins, Raleigh, 107 Ms W. Hargett St. 

Randolph, Rev. John T. Biddle, Asheboro, Box 309 

Roanoke, Rev. C. W. Bazemore, Scotland Neck 
J. Thad Ashley, Williamston, Box 724 

Rowan, Rev. T. W. Bray, Faith, Box 86 

Sandy Creek, Rev. Henry Powell, Sanford, Box 671 

Sandy Run, Guy S. Walker, Forest City, 209 Carolina Ave. 

South Fork, Rev. A. A. Walker, Newton, First Baptist Church 

South Mountain, Miss Lysbeth Cox, Rutherford College 

South Yadkin, Miss Willa Marks, Statesville, 310 S. Race St. 

Stanly, Rev. Norwood Davis, Albemarle, Route 2 



288 Baptist State Convention 

Tar River, Rev. Lee Pridgen, Louisburg, Box 306 

Three Forks, Miss Juanita Davis, Boone, First Baptist Church 

Transylvania, Rev. Floyd B. Clark, Brevard, Route 1 

Union, Mr. Boyd Horton, Monroe, 304 Winburn St. 

West Liberty, Rev. P. H. Chastin, Culberson, Route 2 

Western North Carolina, Miss Mildred Whitfield, Murphy, 211 Hia- 

Wassee St. 
Wilmington, Rev. E. C. Chamblee, Wilmington, 100 Woodlawn Ave. 
Yadkin, Mrs. Mae Grigg, Yadkinville 
Yancey, Miss Laura Mae Hilliard, Burnsville, Box 53 
Burnt Swamp, Harvie L. Brewington, Pembroke, Box 56 



of North Carolina 



289 



LIST OF ORDAINED MINISTERS WHO ARE SERVING AS 
PASTORS OR ACTIVE IN DENOMINATIONAL WORK 

This roster of ministers is made from the records furnished by 
the Associational Clerks who get the information from the Clerks 
of the Churches. If, when a minister changes his address, he will 
notify the Statistical Secretary of such change, it will be greatly 
appreciated. From this list is made the mailing list for use at Baptist 
Headquarters in Raleigh, also the list of North Carolina ministers 
published in the Annual of the Southern Baptist Convention. Please 
give notice immediately of any needed correction. 

L. L. Morgan, 
Statistical Secretary. 



Abernathy, C. A., Rt. 6, Fay- 

etteville 
Abrams, R. W., Rutherfordton 
Adams, C. L., Robbinsville 
Adams, R. E., Winston-Salem, 

3733 Ogburn Ave. 
Adams, T. O., Winston-Salem, 

R. F. D. 
Adams, Wm. T., Greensboro, 103 

E. Wendover Ave. 
Adkins, Eules G., Burnsville, 

Box 29 
Adkinson, W. C, Greensboro, 

16th St., Church 
Akin, Jack T., Monroe 
Aldridge, J. G., Landis 
Alexander, M. O., Lake View, 

S. C. 
Allard, J. E., Wilmington, Rt. 2 
Allen, James G., Rominger 
Allen, K., Waynesville 
Allgood, J. G., Yadkinville, Rt. 2 
Allred,. J. M., Pomona 
Anderson, H. B., Durham, 1104 

N. Mangum St. 
Anderson, O. A., Rowland 
Anderson, James, Etowah 
Andrews, Edwin R., Raleigh, 

Rt. 1 
Andrews, Victor L., Lexington, 

Rt. 5 
Andrews, W. O., Durham, Dur- 
ham Memorial Church 
Arant, N. F., Kinston, Rt. 4 
Archer, W. Brady, Asheville, 306 

S. French Broad Ave. 
Armstrong, A. C, West Ashe- 
ville, 122 Sand Hill Rd. 
Armstrong, Neil J., High Point, 

111 Hillcrest Dr. 
Armstrong, Dewey, Rural Hall 
Arnette, Roy, B., Rockingham 
Arnold, Felix, Enfield 

19 



Ashill, A. B., High Point, 

2203 Green St. 
Ashley, Arthur C, Warrensville 
Ashley, J. T., Williamston 
Ashley, R. C, Bina 
Ashley, G. N., Salemburg 
Ashley, W. D., Blowing Rock, 

Rt. 1 
Atkins, J. L., Raleigh, Rt. 4 
Atkins, R. E., Raleigh, 27 Dixie 

Trail 
Austin, B. F., Kings Mountain, 

601 Piedmont 
Austin, Sam F., Alexander, Rt. 1 
Austin, Don, Charlotte 
Auten, Charles, Wake Forest 
Ayers, W. A., Shelby, 621 East 

Marion St. 
Ayscue, J. E., Buies Creek 
I Bagby, A. Paul, Buies Creek 
Bagwell, Jack, Asheville, Rt. 4 
Bailes, E. W., Durham, 

3009 Banner Ave. 
Baines, J. J., Alarka 
Bailes, R. W., Kannapolis, 

7§3 Walter St. 
Baker, C. E., Charlotte, 

Durham Memorial 
Baker, E. F., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 5 
Baker, J. M., Lowell 
Baker, J. T., Crumpler 
Baker, James E., Timberlake 
Baker, H. M., Southport 
Baker, Homer O., Charlotte, 

4910 Monroe Road 
Baker, Smoot A., Grover 
Baker, S. D., Thomasville 
Baker, Zeb D., China Grove, 

Box 436 
Ball, Kimsie R., Alexander, Rt. 2 
Ballard, W. H., Mars Hill, Rt. 2 



290 



Baptist State Convention 



Ballenger, Paul R., Horseshoe 
, Banister, M. L., Oxford 
Banks, Morris Z., Weaverville, 

Rt. 1 
Banning, Ralph, Horse Shoe, Rt. 1 
Barham, Howard L., Mt. Airy, 

Rt. 2 
Barker, Robert, Murphy 
Barker, W. H., High Point, 

415 South St. 
Barkley, W. C, Troutman 
Barnes, Clay R., Spencer, 

113 Charles St. 
Barnes, F. M., Penrose 
Barnes, J. H., Fayetteville, Rt. 3 
Barnes, Junie, Salisbury 
Barnes, M. L., Gastonia, Rt. 2 
Barnett, L. P., Union Mills 
Barr, V. Ward, Gastonia 
Bartlett, E. R., Asheville, 

Box 7042 
Barton, E. B., Piney Creek 
Basden, H. A., Durham, Rt. 3 
Bass, B. G., Fair Bluff 
Baucom, C. E., Wilson 
Baucom, W. T., Yancey ville, 

Box 96 
Bazemore, C. W., Scotland Neck 
Bean, Harry F., Belcross 
Bean, Leonard B., Collettsville 
Bearden, W. Clyde, Paw Creek 
Beasley, M. K., Lake Waccamaw 
Beck, O. C, Balsam 
Beckham, Lester, Statesville 
Beck, Gilmer, Warsaw 
Benfield, H. E., Candler, Rt. 3 
Benfield, H. S., Hudson 
Benfield, R. Knolan, Hickory 
Benfield, Paul, Conover 
Bennett, Edward P., Morganton, 

Rt. 3 
Bennett, H. B., Shallotte 
Bennett, Hubert, Greensboro, 

Rt. 1 
Bennett, I. L., Fort Meade 
Bennett, J. C, Albemarle, Rt. 1 
Bennett, R. O., Mayodan 
Benton, A. L., Kerr 
Bergen, E. D., Stantonsburg 
Bessinger, C. D., Asheville, 

34 Pinellas 
Biddle, J. T., Asheboro 
Biggerstaff, W. P., Shelby, Rt. 5 
Biles, T. H., Charlotte 
Billings, Ray, Dobson 
Binkley, J. N., Harmony, Rt. 1 
Bishop, Joe, Gay 
Bishop, V. W., Mayo, S. C. 
Bishop, J. E., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 



Black, J. H., Green Mountain, 

Rt. 1 
Black, L. H., Lenoir 
Black, W. W., Dallas 
Blackburn, Arthur F., Lincolnton 
Blackburn, F. H., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 7 
Blackburn, J. Glenn, Wake 

Forest 
Blackburn, M. D., Lenoir 
Blackmore, James, Wilmington, 

Rt. 2 
Blackwell, Hoyt, Mars Hill 
Blalock, Jesse, Shelby, Rt. 4 
Blalock, John N., Norwood 
Bland, Thos. A., Carrboro 
Blankenship, F. P., Rockwell, 

Rt. 2 
Blanton, M. D., Forest City 
Blanton, S. L., Wake Forest 
Blanton, W. L., Belwood, Rt. 1 
Blevins, Ernest, Hays 
Blevins, Fred, Wilkesboro 
Blevins, Hillery E., Hays 
Blevins, M. L., Springfield 
Blevins, S. L., Hays 
Blue, W. C, Bunn 
Blythe, C. E., Hendersonville, 

Rt. 4 
Blythe, J. E., Hendersonville, 

Rt. 3 
Blythe, Norman L., Rocky Mount, 

Rt. 3 
Boatwright, C. W., Monroe, Rt. 5 
Bobbitt, C. B., Kings Mountain, 

Box 208 
Bobbitt, David E., Charlotte, 

1812 Tippah Ave. 
Boggan, W. H., Rockingham 
Bolch, O. H., Albemarle, Rt. 4 
Bolick, W. P., Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Booker, E. B., Rockfish 
Bookout, L. E., Gastonia, West 

End, P. O. Box 2233 
Bond, W. G., Boone 
Bowers, H. C, Middlesex 
Bowers, B. A., Ridgecrest 
Bowman, J. N., Gastonia, Rt. 3 
Brady, H. E., Columbus, Box 132 
Bradley, Earle L., Raleigh, 

119 Hillsboro St. 
Bradley, Oren, Rutherfordton, 

Star Rt. 
Bradley, Ralph, Whittier, Rt. 1 
Bradley, Silas H., Tryon, Rt. 1 
Bradley, W. J., Albemarle 
Bradley, W. A., Alexander 
Branch, Douglas M., Kannapolis 

First Baptist Church 
Branch, H. S., Alamance 



of North Carolina 



291 



Bray, Tom W., Faith, Box 86 
Brazil, S. K., Greensboro, Rt. 8 
Brendle, J. G., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 3 
Brickhouse, R. E., Warrenton 
Bridges, Lawrence, Wake Forest 
Bridgers, Leo, Durham, 

1203 Park Ave. 
Bridges, Odell, Ellenboro 
Bright, Paul, Ellenboro, Rt. 2 
Brinkley, R. O., China Grove, 

Box 406 
Brisson, C. E., Wilmington, 

2118 Gibson Ave. 
Britt, R. A., Bladenboro 
Britt, Elliott, Lumberton, Rt. 2 
Britt, Ira, Lumberton, Rt. 5 
Britt, N. F., Salisbury, Box 572 
Brittain, Carson, Marion, Rt. 4 
^Broach, Claude U., Charlotte, 

2516 Sherwood Ave. 
Broadway, B. V., Thomasville 
Brock, J. A., Shelby, 

315 Gidney St. 
Brock, Paul T., Gastonia, 

810 Marietta St. 
Brooks, A. W., Pleasant Garden 
Brooks, B. B., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Brooks, D. P., Elizabeth City, 
..113 Pritchard St. 
(•Brooks, J. Boyce, Roxboro 
Brooks, J. C, Granite Falls, Rt. 2 
Brooks, C. E., Gastonia, 

417 Park Ave. 
Brooks, R. A., Mill Springs 
Brookshire, W. N., Wilkesboro 
Brookshire, Zeb, Hendersonville 
Broome, B. S., Monroe 
Broom, Lewey, Argura 
Brothers, A. R., Rockingham 
Brown, Denver T., Marshall, Rt. 1 
Brown, A. L., Beulaville 
Brown, C. V., Canton 
Brown, Clate, North Wilkesboro, 

Rt. 1 
Brown, Frank, Cranberry 
Brown, J. E., Tuckaseigee 
Brown, J. C, Cranberry 
Brown, Verge, Warne 
Brown, Walter, Elon College 
Brown, W. M., Blowing Rock, 

Rt. 1 
Brown, Walter V., Haw River 
Bruce, Paul E., Ellerbe 
Brunner, Paul, Rural Hall 
Bryan, Fulton B., Wake Forest, 

Box 855 
Bryant, J. S., North Wilkesboro, 
/- Rt. 2 
/Bryant, K. E., Pittsboro 



Bryant, Tim, Reidsville, Rt. 4 
Bryson, Jack D., Candler, Rt. 1 
Buchanan, Avery, Green Moun- 
tain, Rt. 1 
Buchanan, C. A., Toecane, Rt. 1 
Buchanan, Bruce, Clarrissa 
Buchanan, W. B., Toecane, Rt. 1 
Buckner, A. J., Asheville, Rt. 2 
Buckner, J. J., Marshall, Rt. 2 
Bullard, G. W., Raleigh, 

119 Hillsboro St. 
Bumgarner, D. D., Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Bumgarner, A. B., Talyorsville 
Bumgarner, E. V., Taylorsville 
Buchanan, Clarence, Toecane 
i^Buhn, J. H., Morehead City 
Burchette, Charles P., Jr., 

Bladenboro 
Burch, George W., Wingate 
Burcham, Marvin, Ronda 
Burgiss, L. Grady, Jacksonville 
Burke, L. S., Boiling Springs 
Burkett, G. C., Jefferson 
Burnett, O. F., Canton, Rt. 2 
Burnett, Grade, Needmore 
Burns, Rufus, Lumberton, Rt. 4 
Burns, M. L., Blairsville, Ga. 
Burris, C. C, Wingate 
Burrus, W. Edgar, Mt. Airy 
Byerly, E. W., Bear Creek, Rt. 2 
Byerly, J. R., Elizabeth City, 

Box 101 
Byerly, W. H., Lenoir 
u-Byrd, C. E., Apex, Rt. 3 
Byrd, Eugene, Black Mountain 
Byrd, R. D., Albemarle, 

114 Wilson 
Byrum, J. T., Belhaven 
Cable, J. E., Santeetlah 
Cadle, R. A., Apex 
Cain, Guy S., Graham 
Cain, L. W., Henrietta 
Caldwell, E. J., Belmont 
Caldwell, W. H., Sparta 
Call, R. Andrew, North Wilkes- 
boro, Rt. 2 
Callahan, Glenn, Asheville 
/\\%Vz Hudson St. 
Klammack, James C, Smithfield 
Camp, W. G., Mooresboro 
Campbell, A. L., Landis, Box 151 
KCampbell, A. Hartwell, Dunn 
Campbell, Roy D., Bakersville 
Campbell, W. Lester, Pilot 

Mountain 
Cannady, E. H., Richlands 
Canipe, J. C, Hendersonville 
Cannon, D. Boyd, Shelby, Rt. 3 
Cantrell, J. R., Boiling Springs 
Carnes, W. L., Lilesville 



292 



Baptist State Convention 



Carpenter, L. L., Raleigh, 
Recorder Building 
Carpenter, Ralph B., Belwood, 

Rt. 1 
Carr, W. B., Mooresville, 

201 W. Center Ave. 
kCarr, W. T., Durham, 

1105 Watts St." 
Carroll, W. Van, Lexington, Rt. 3 
Carroll, R. N., Edenton 
Carswell, I. I., Morganton, Rt. 4 
Carter, Burris, Loris, S. C. 
Carter, J. E., Icard 
Carter, J. R., Hammond, S. C. 
Carter, John, Wake Forest 
Carter, Thomas N., Highlands 
Carver, Earl, Heaton 
Case, J. V., Jr., Rose Hill 
Cashwell, T. L., Gastonia, 

321 S. Columbia St. 
Cassell, W. M., New Bern, Rt. 2 
Cates, W. F., Asheboro, Box 663 
Catlett, N. A., Clayton 
Caudle, E. P., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 7 
Caudle, W. S., Stovall 
Caudle, Zeb A., Aberdeen 
Caulder, G. C, Chesterfield, S. C. 
Chambers, Gay, Canton, Rt. 2 
Chamblee, E. C, Wilmington, 

100 Woodlawn 
Chandler, L. C, Davis 
Chapman, M. C, Charlotte 
Chapman, M. W., Fayetteville, 

Box 286 
Chapman, N. H., Rosman 
Chappell, J. D., Robbinsville 
Chastine, Grady, Culberson, Rt. 2 
Cheek, A. K., Marshall 
Chikelelee, Dewitt, Robbinsville 
Cherry, H. E., Raleigh, 3 S. 

Person 
Cheshire, A. C, Mocksville, Rt. 2 
Childers, W. Paul, Louisburg, 

Rt. 2 
Chilton, J. W., Pilot Mountain, 

Rt. 2 
Chilton, E. M., Tigersville, S. C, 

N. Greenville, Jr., College 
Christopher, Bruce, Lincolnton, 

Rt. 4 
Chronister, C. M., Icard, Box 84 
Church, Avery M, Winston- 
Salem, 2011 Waughtown 
Clark, Floyd B.. Brevard, Rt. 1 
Clark, J. H., High Point, 

327 Woodrow 
Clark, J. L., Currie 
Clark, L. S., Mount Holly 
Clark, L. F., Canton 



Cleary, D. O., North Wilkesboro 
Clemmons, Clifton W., U. S. 

Army 
| Clemmons, D. M., Fayetteville, 

Rt. 5 
Clifford, J. Roy, Lexington 
Clifton, J. B., Greensboro, 

619 Waugh Ave. 
Cline, Mack M., Concord, Rt. 1 
Cline, R. C, Kannapolis, Rt. 4 
Cloer, W. Andrew, Hayesville 
Cloer, G. A., Leatherman 
Coats, W. E., Reidsville 
Cobb, J. Sydney, Whaleyville, 

Va. 
Cockerham, C. C, Roaring River 
Coffey, Harley, Lenoir 
Coffey, Ham, Murphy 
Coffey, Willard, West Asheville 
Coggins, L. V., Semora 
Cohn, D. K., West Asheville 
Cohn, H. D., Candler, Rt. 1 
Colburn, Frank, Rhodhiss 
Cole, Edward G., Winterville 
Coleman, Kelly, Bladenboro 
Coley, J. L., Raleigh, 614 W. 

North St. 
Collins, Clyde, Brevard, Rt. 2 
Collins, Richard L., Sharpsburg 
Collins, T. D., Durham, 

1603 Lakewood Ave. 
Colvard, G. W., Burlington, 

105 Trail 11 
Comer, C. V., Steed 
Cone, W. B., Henderson, Rt. 1 
Condrey, G. A., Marion, Rt. 2 
Connell, J. H., Concord, Rt. 9 
Connell, L. V., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 6 
Connell, W. J., Wadesboro, Rt. 2 
Connor, W. T., Biltmore, 

115 y 2 Montana 
Conrad, M. A., Shelby, Rt. 2 
Cook, Ben, Canton 
Cook, Charlie, F., Hudson, Rt. 1 
Cook, J. M., Lilesville 
Cook, L. M., Elkin, Box 365 
Cook, M. L., Vale, Route 3 
Cook, R. C, Lenoir, Rt. 8 
Cook, R. R., Statesville, Rt. 2 
Cook, Tom, Mount Airy, Rt. 2 
Cook, W. A., Spindale, Box 95 
Cook, W. L., Copperhill, Tenn. 
Cook, W. J., Boone, Rt. 1 
Cook, W. N., Webster 
Cooper, Clifton, Valdese, Rt. 1 
Cooper, Thomas N., Rich Square 
Coppedge, Harvey L., 

Castalia 
Corey, A., Jamesville 



of North Carolina 



293 



Corn, J. V., Kanapolis, Rt. 2, 

Brantley Rd. 
Corn, Quay, Henderson ville, 

Rt. 2 
Corn, Riley P., Asheville, 

Box 629 
Costner, J. W., Newland 
Costner, Robert L., Knightdale 
Costner, W. A., Gastonia 
Cothren, Grant, Trahill 
Councilman, R. L., Windsor 
• Coward, S. H., Wilmington, 

403 Dock St. 
^Cox, Ben W., Swepsonville 
Cox, Floy W., Jr., Guilford 

College 
Cox, G. C, Asheville, 

285 Merrimon Ave. 
Cox, J. A., Asheville, 

30 Forsythe St. 
Cox, Truett, Durham, 

2818 Chapel Hill Rd. 
Craig, W. B., Union Mills 
Crain, William J., Cary 
Cranford, A. B., China Grove 
Crater, R. R., Ronda 
Crawford, C. E., Selma 
Crawford, Lee, Franklin, Rt. 4 
Crawford, L. H., Sylva, Rt. 1 
Crawford, R. L., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 1 
Creason, Claude, Bear Creek 
Creech, C. S., Kenly, Rt. 2 
Creech, Oscar, Ahoskie 
Crews, J. A., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 3 
Crisp, Guy, Brasstown 
Crisp, J. H., Lenoir, Rt. 3, Box 67 
Crisp, James, Wilmington, 

25 Lee Drive 
Cross, C. C, Marion 

East Marion Station 
Crouch, D. E., Lincolnton, Rt. 4 
Crouch, John P., Kannapolis, 

Rt. 4 
.Crouch, W. Perry, Asheville, 

First Baptist Church 

Rt. 4 
Crouse, W. M., 422 Wachovia St., 

Winston-Salem 3 

Crowe, J. Marvin, Charlotte, 

First Baptist Church 
Crow, C. C, Shelby, Rt. 5 
Crump, Gordon, Lenoir, Box 76 
Crump, J. E., Hudson 
Culler, W. J., Rockingham, Rt. 3 
Cummings, Collidge, Rowland, 

Rt. 1 
Cunningham, Carl, Murphy, Rt. 2 
Currin, J. B., Roxboro 



Cutshaw, Rush, Marble, Rt. 1 
Dabney, Fred E., Forest City, 

207 Broadway 
Dailey, J. B., Jackson 
Dalewhite, R. H., West Durham 
Dameron, W. Marvin, Marion, 

Rt. 2 
Daniels, Jeffie, Taylorsville 
Darnell, W. Clyde, Mebane 
Davenport, C. W., Winston- 
Salem, Rt. 7 
Davidson, W. W., Boiling Springs 
Davis, Boyce A., Kershaw, S. C. 
Davis, L. R., Granite Falls, Rt. 1 
Davis, B. L., Snow Hill 
Davis, George, Star 
Davis, Henry T., China Grove, 

Rt. 1 
Davis, Henry, Mineral Bluff, Ga. 
Davis, G. W., Steeds, Rt. 1 
Davis, J. P., Mocksville 
Davis, J. T., Kannapolis, 

Buick Ave. 
Davis, J. W., Four Oaks 
Davis, Norwood, Albemarle 
Davis, Winfrey, Beaufort 
Davis, J. Yoder, Clyde, Rt. 1 
^Dawkins, Howard G., Kinston 
Day, Richard, Elkin 
Day, D. W., Elkin, Rt. 1 
Deaton, T. Paul, Hillsboro 
Deaver, Cade F., Laurinburg, 

423 McNair Ave. 
Deese, T. B., Concord, 

17 Swink St., Rt. 9 
Delgado, M. E., Wake Forest 
Dellinger, O. C, Lenoir, Rt. 7 
Dellinger, Coy H., Cherryville 
Denny, Carl, Flats 
Denny, Gilmer, Pilot Mountain, 

Rt. 1 
Denny, T. D., Flats 
Denny, W. E., Silas Creek 
DeWeese, R. L., Salisbury, 

Box 121 
Dickens, J. W., Lexington, Rt. 6 
Digh, D. W., Lexington 
Digh, Julius W., Monroe, 

312 Walnut 
Dilday, Herman T., Goldsboro 
Dinwiddie, Frank, Manteo 
Dixon, L. M., Cameron 
Dixon, R. Love, East Gastonia 
Dobbins, Paul, Gaffney, S. C, 

Rt. 5 
Doogan, Robert, Erwin, Tenn., 

Rt. 2 
Dorsey, E. H., Bryson City 
Dosher, J. Bryan, Kelly 
Douthit, Earnest, New Bern 



294 



Baptist State Convention 



Dowd, G. W., Wilmington 
Dowe, J. B., St. Pauls 
Downs, P. E., Salemburg 
Downs, T. G., Boiling Springs 
Draughan, T. S., Crutchfield 
Drye, M. H., Charlotte, 

Rt. 9, Box 88A 
Dula, Walter, Lenoir, Rt. 5 
Duling, C. W., Hertford 
Duncan, J. M., Murfreesboro 
Dunevant, J. A., Reidsville 
Dunning, A. H., High Point, 

806 Tryon St. 
Dunn, J. V., Spencer, Box 955 
Eagle, E. F., Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Early, B. G., Cerro Gordo 
Early, J. Frank, Caroleen 
Early k Robert, Mill Springs 
Early, M. R., Saluda 
Early, Waldo, Roseboro, Rt. 2 
Earp, Ronda, Vilas 
,-Ea.sley, J. A., Wake Forest 
Eddinger, Clyde C, Southmont 
Edmisten, D. M., Boone 
Edmonds, O. S., Marshall, Rt. 2 
Edney, A. E., Flat Rock, Box 75 
Edwards, J. C, Liberty, Box 313 
Fdwards, John T., Durham, Rt. 5 
Edwards, Otto, Loris, S. C. 
Edwards, Vance, Kannapolis, 

Rt. 2 
Eggers, R. C, Zionville 
Elam, W. A., Franklinville 
Eller, A. W., Wilkesboro, Rt. 1 
Eller, J. Ben, Greensboro, 

709 Asheboro 
Elliott, E. S., Cherryville 
Elliott, P. L., Boiling Springs 
Elliott, L. G., Waynesville 
Elliott, Y. C, Sanford 
Ellis, C. J., Pembroke 
Ellis, J. T., Greensboro, 

101 Dockery St. 
Ellis, R. A., Salisbury, 

322 S. Church St. 
Elmore, S. E., Graham 
Entrekin, W. E., Kannapolis, 

Rt. 3 
Erwin, T. E., Canton, Rt. 3 
Estep, L. L., Whaley 
Everett, James R., Robersonville 
Evans, Lucius R., Charlotte, 

1023 Central Ave. 
Fair, Bertie, Newton, 

North College St. 
Farrington, Ben, Colfax 
Fulk, T. J., Harrellsville 
^ulk, A. Lincoln, Dunn, Box 602 
Ferguson, E. M., Monroe, Box 
210 



s 



Ferguson, H. L., Charlotte, 

216 Bradford Dr. 
Ferguson, W. Forest, Clyde, Rt. 1 
Featherston, J. R., Forest City, 

Rt. 2 
Ferguson, Ralph E., Corapeake 
Fields. Luby W, New London 
Field, W. A., Sunbury 
Finger, John, Waynesville, Rt. 2 
^Finlator, W. W., Elizabeth City 
Finley, Hubert L., Chesnee, 

South Carolina 
Fisher, Ben C, Boiling Springs 
Fisher, V. C, Marshall, Rt. 2 
Fleming, L. A., Mt. Airy 
Fletcher, Phillip D., Granite 

Falls 
Flovd, C. M., High Point, 

508 Carter St. 
Flowe, T. B., Lenoir, Rt. 5 
Flowers, W. H., Valdese, Rt. 1 
Flynn, Thomas D., Winston- 
Salem, Rt. 7 
Fogleman, T. W., Kings 

Mountain, 108 Fulton St. 
Folds, J. B., Spruce Pine 
Foushee, G. L., Wake Forest 
Ford, Fletcher, Severn 
Ford, Howard J., Elkin 
Forester, Fred, Drexel 
Foster, R. C, Leaksville 
Fox, J. W., Lenoir 
Fowler, Carol, Asheville, 

Box 2154 
Fox, Zollie W., Speedwell 
Francis, C. A., Nashville 
Francis, W. C, Tyner 
Francis, George, Kingsport, 

Tenn. 
Franklin, Charlie, Winston- 
Salem, Rt. 3 
Franklin, Roy W., Hays 
Fraser, Forrest L., Greensboro, 

921 Spring Garden 
Frazier, A. D., Elizabethtown 
Freeman, E. W., Selma 
Freeman, John, Wesser 
Freeman, J. Grady, Leicester, 

Rt. 2 
freeman, L. E. H., Raleigh, Rt. 3 
7 Freeman, Tom M., Burlington, 

708 W. Front St. 
Freeman, Z. Miller, Harmony 
Frye, Robert, Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Fryer, T. W,. New Bern, 

40 Johnson St. 
Fugate, B. C, Dellwood 
Fulmer, A. E., Conway, S. C. 



of North Carolina 



295 



Funderburke, Lawrence, 

Indian Trail, Rt. 1 
Funderburk, Guy, Oakboro 
Funderburk, O. W., Wake Forest, 

Box 29 
Funderburk, J. F., Roxboro, Rt. 2 
Furr, W. T., Kannapolis, Rt. 1 
yGaines, Louis S., Fayetteville, 

302 Sylvan Rd. 
Gainey, Houston, Rockingham 
Gales, Foby W., Kannapolis, 

214 Coach St. 
Gales, Paul, Kannapolis, Box 443 
Gambill, A. L., Moxley 
Gamble, John, Raleigh, Box 85 
Gantt, P. C, Tabor City 
XJardner, E. N., Henderson 
/ Garner, John U., Rolesville 
Garner, W. E., Randleman 
Gardner, R. A., Jonesboro 
Gardner, R. F., Concord, 

205 Young St. 
Barrett, F. B., Hayesville 
Garrison, Melvin C, Dacusville, 

S. C. 
Garver, Carme V., East Gastonia 
Gaskins, Eric D., Tabor City 
Gauldin, H. P., Greensboro, Rt. 5 
Gentry, W. F., Nashville, Rt. 2 
George, Esiah, Cherokee 
George, Goliath, Cherokee 
Gibson, E. M., Asheville, Rt. 4 
Gibson, Alfred F., Durham, 

2414 Guess Road 
Gibson, J. B., Leicester, Rt. 1 
Gillespie, J. C, Reidsville, Rt. 2 
Gilley, J. A., Jonesville 
Glass, G. Hubert, Minpro 
Glazier, Arthur H., Wilmington 
Glisson, B. M., White Oak 
Glosson, Clyde W., Kernersville 
Godwin, C. E., Rocky Mount, 

Rt. 1 
Godwin, L. E., Rocky Mount, 

Rt. 2 
Good, Homer L., Stony Point 
Goodwin, J. David, Hildebran 
Goodwin, H. F., Concord, 

194 Academy St. 
Gordon, R. R., Pittsboro 
Gordon, Billy M., Youngsville 
Gordon, W. B., Wake Forest 
Gore, E. O., Kings Mountain, 

Rt. 1 
Gore, Mack, Conway, S. C. 
Gosnell, W. Ray, West End 
Graham, George M., Goldston 
Grant, D. B., Chesterfield, S. C. 
Grant, Worth C, Weldon 
Gray, Charlie T., New Hill, Rt. 1 



Graybeal, S. S., Creston 
Green, Alvin, Gastonia, 

Victory Station 
Greene, C. H., Canton 
^fireene, C. Sylvester, Durham 
Greene, Edward W., Henderson, 
Rt. 5, Box 289 
* Greene, C. O., Cary 
Green, Elmer, Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Green, I. H., Hendersonville 
Green, John, Blairsville, Ga., 

Rt. 3 
Green, J. Levi, Purlear 
Green, N. M., Boone, Rt. 2 
Green, R. B., Tryon, Rt. 1 
Green, Roscoe, Deep Gap 
Greene, Robert, Warrenton 
Green, V. W., Pineola 
Gresham, N. E., Jacksonville 
Griffin, J. D., Charlotte, 

Box 2121 
Griffin, N. H., Marshall, Rt. 3 
Grigg, W. R., Winston-Salem, 

20 E. Sprague 
Grissom, Maurice W., Shiloh 
Griswald, L. B., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 3 
Groce, J. H., Cana 
Guffie, Raleigh, Prestiss, Star Rt. 
Guffey, John J., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 2 
Gunter, Wayne, Bryson City 
Gunter, Frank, Whittier 
Gupton, B. L., Greensboro, Rt. 5 
Guthrie, W. B., Fayetteville, 

122 y 2 Bryan Bldg. 
Guth, W. C, High Point, 

918 Redding 
Guy, T. Sloane, Sr., Gatesville 
,Guy, T. Sloane, Jr., Wadesboro 
Gwaltney, J. C, Elkin 
Gwaltney, Rogers C, Statesville, 

200 Tradd St. 
Hackney, J. Parks, Siler City, 

Rt. 1 
Hadaway, J. H., Glenville 
Hagaman, Lawrence, Beech 

Creek 
Hagaman, John, Zionville 
Hagler, Otis, Carthage 
Hagler, R. M., Caroleen 
Hall, E. J., Celo 
Hall, J. Howard, Canton 
Hall, Joe H., Mount Airy, Rt. 2 
Hall, M. F., Rutherfordton, 

Box 87 
Hallman, John A., Vale, Rt. 1 
Hamby, Grady A., Granite Falls, 

Rt. 2, Box 161B 
Hamilton, Wistar, Washington 



296 



Baptist State Convention 



Hammett, H. G., Durham, 

Temple Baptist Church 
Hammond, Chesley, Rowland, 

Rt. 1 
Hammonds, J. E., Shannon, Rt. 1 
Hampton, Otis, High Point 
Hancock, Ernest D., Star 
Hancock, C. C, Hamlet 
Hancock, W. F., Robbins 
Hankins, W. B., Patrick 
Hanner, Richard, Greensboro, 

Battleground Road 

ardaway, R. E., Greenville, 

Box 738 
Hardin, E. F., Morganton, 

500 S. Green St. 
Howard, A. T., Landrum, S. C, 

Rt. 1 
Hardin, N. S., Shelby, Rt. 4 
Hardwick, O. E., Conway, S. C. 
Hardy, Paul F., Wake Forest, 

Box 20 
Hargrove, B. H., Waynesville, 

Rt. 2 
Harrell, H. F., Shelby, Rt. 4 
Harrelson, A. D., Loris, S. C. 
Harrington, Ray W., Greensboro, 

705 Delancy St. 
Harrington, W. B., Williamston 
Harris, E. R., Virgilina, Va. 
Harris, Horace, Lenoir, 

120 Oil Ave. 
Harris, D. P., Raleigh, 

1203 Filmore 
Harris, C. W., Rutherfordton 
Harris, L. B., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Harris, M. I., Valdese 
Harris, Oscar J., Blowing Rock 
Harris, P. C, Red Oak 
Harris, Reid R., Robbins 
Harris, Robert, Asheville, Rt. 3 
Harris, W. W., Shelby, 

914 S. Lafayette St. 
Harron, C. D., Weaverville, Rt. 1 
Hart, M. D., West Jefferson 
Hartman, O. M., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 2 
Hartsell, W. Lee, Richfield 
Hartsell, P. P., Middlesex 
Hastings, M. L., Morganton, Rt. 2 
Hasty, W. W., Wallace 
Hatley, S. A., Monroe, Rt. 3 
Hathcock, A. A., Concord, 

Rt. 2, Box 250 
Hawkins, Leo F., Norwood 
Hawkins, W. L., Cherryville, 

Box 157 
Hawkins, Harold L., Spring Hope 
Hayes, A. B., Hays 
Hayes, A. C, Longhurst, Box 62 



Hayes, J. E., North Wilkesboro 
yHayes, James M., Winston- 
Salem, 812 Overbrook Ave. 
Hayes, W. Noah, North 

Wilkesboro 
Haynes, Clarence, Fletcher 
Haynes, Grady J., Hobgood 
Hearn, Henry O., Arden, Rt. 1 
Hearne, T. W., Valdese, Rt. 1 
Heath, R. E., Asheboro, Rt. 1 
Heaton, George D., Charlotte, 

1850 Sterling Road 
Heddon, W. A., Murphy 
Hedgepeth, I. P., Lumberton 
Helderman, L. F., Charlotte, 

Rt. 9, Box 295 
Helms, Carl, Concord, Rt. 9 
Helms, Floyd, Kannapolis, Rt. 1 
Helms, V. T., Charlotte, Rt. 4 
Helms, W. Guy, Charlotte, Rt. 2 
Helton, Ira, Culberson 
Hemphill, Carl, Morganton, Rt. 2 
Hemphill, F. D., Hickory, 

11th Ave. 
Henderson, C. H., Saxapahaw 
Henderson, T. S., Barnardsville 
Hendon, J. C. R., Mooresville 
.Hendricks, Garland A., Apex, 

Rt. 3 
Hendrix, Raymond, Boone 
Hendrix, J. T., Hays 
Henline, J. H., Bakersville 
Henry, B. G., Hendersonville, 

Box 449 
Hensley, B. S., Sylva, Rt. 1 
Hensley, William M., Candler, 

Rt. 2 
Herrin, J. C, Chapel Hill 
Herring, C. P., Fairmont 
/Herring, Owen F., Wake Forest 
Herring, Ralph A., Winston- 
Salem, 912 Linwood Ave. 
Hester, C. R., St. Pauls 
Hester, Gaston, Bladenboro, 

Rt. 1 
Hester, Paul, Hudson, Rt. 1 
Hester, W. R., Hendersonville 
Hice, Grover, Granite Falls 
Hicks, A. M., Lewisville 
Hicks, E. B., Concord, Rt. 1 
Hicks, H. P., Mars Hill, Rt. 2 
Hicks, P. A., Lincolnton, Rt. 4 
High, S. A., Garner 
Highfill, Lawrence, Mars Hill 
Hill, Bill, Troutman 
Hill, J. C, Kannapolis, 11th St. 
Hill, James E., Asheboro, 

General Delivery 
Hill, J. H, Salisbury, 
124 Klumac St. 



of North Carolina 



297 



Hill, W. C, Troutman 

Hill, W. E., Caroleen 

Hill, Woodrow W., Albemarle, 

933 Mills St. 
Hines, H. B., Oriental 
Hinson, Roy L., Burnsville, Rt. 2 
Hocutt, George L., Charlotte, 

609 E. 36th St. 
Hocutt, H. M., Asheville, 

112 Belmont 
Hodge, Dewey, Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 2 
Hodge, Mack, Elizabethtown, 

Tenn. 
Hodges, D. D., Mt. Airy 
Hodges, E. C, Hendrix 
Hodges, Ira, Banner Elk 
Hodges, J. L., New Bern 
Hoffman, W. Arthur, 

Gastonia, 1326 W. Franklin 
Hogan, Joseph R., Jonesville 
Hogsed, Boyd, Shooting Creek, 

Rt. 1 
Holbert, Josiah, Saluda 
Holbert, Lloyd, Eat Flat Rock 
Holcombe, Claude, Rosman 
Holden, N. E., Franklin, Rt. 3 
Holder, Gurney, Mt. Airy, Rt. 4 
Holland, C. C, Statesville, Rt. 6 
Holland, J. R., Longview, 

Rural Station 
Holland, Ronald, Robbinsville 
Holland, T. C, Cliffside 
Hollar, Floyd, Kings Mountain, 

Rt. 2 
Hollerfield, Waits, Marion, Rt. 2 
'Hollingsworth, L. H., Mebane 
Hollingsworth, W. E., Fayette- 

ville, 704 Greenland Dr. 
Holoway, J. F., Buies Creek 
Hollowell, W. H., Castalia 
Holmes, E. W., Farmville 
Holmes, W. B., Albemarle 
Holt, L. D., Bethel 
Holt, Robert L., Durham, Rt. 1 
Holton, W. S., Reidsville, 

103 Silver St. 
Honeycutt, E. J., Albemarle, 

Box 747 
Honeycutt, B. E., Cordova 
Huneycutt, Wilbur A., 

Black Mountain 
Honeycutt, C. C, Stanfield, Rt. 1 
Honeycutt, George, Concord, 

Rt. 4 
Hooper, D. C, Erastus 
Hooper, Wesley, Glenville 
Hopkins, Frank, Alexander, 

Rt. 1 
Hopkins, Fred H., Norwood, Rt. 1 



Hopkins, J. S., High Point, 

Box 1584 
Hopkins, Paul J., Mt. Gilead 
Hopkins, W. B., China Grove 
Horn, G. P., Dallas, Rt. 1 
Hough, J. C, Norwood 
Howard, A. T., Landrum, S. C, 

Rt. 1 
Howard, Charles B., Buies Creek 
Howard, J. W., Kannapolis, 

1103 N. Ridge Ave. 
Howard, Stanley, Wake Forest 
Howell, A. P., White Top, Va. 
Howell, W. H., Castalia 
Hoyle, J. E., Winterville 
Hudson, E. V., Cramerton 
Hudson, James A., Monroe, Rt. 4 
Hudson, S. F., Lillington 
Huffman, J. E., Vale, Rt. 3 
Huffman, J. G., North 

Wilkesboro, Rt. 1 
Huggins, F. M., Hendersonville, 

216 Whitted St. 
Huggins, George W., Marshville, 

Box 19 
Huggins, Robert, Dallas 
Huggins, H. B., Windsor, Rt. 2 
Hughes, Durham, Shelby, Rt. 2 
Hughes, Jesse, Burnsville 
Hughes, J. G., Valley 
Hughes, Ned, Spruce Pine 
Hughes, R. L., Asheboro, Box 203 
Huneycutt, L. A., Salisbury, 

Box 252 
Huneycutt, R. N., Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Hunt, H. T., Concord 
Hunt, T. R., Bostic, Rt. 2 
Huntley, David, Fairview 
Huntley, R. K., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 1 
Huntley, W. C, Fletcher 
Hurley, Frank C, Clinton, Rt. 1 
Hutchens, H. W., Mocksville 

Rt. 2 
Hutchinson, Philip N., Rocky 

Mount, Rt. 4 
Hyatt, J. L., Whittier, Rt. 1 
Icard, A. W., Henderson 
Ingle, George, Canton 
Ingle, M. H., Forest City 
Ingram, Ben, Hartsville, S. C. 
Icenhour, J. A., Hiddenite 
Isley, James A., Swannanoa, 

Box 161 
Ivester, Seth, Lawndale, Rt. 1 
Ives, D. H., Concord, 189 North 

Union 
Jackson, Charlie, Mt. Airy, Rt. 4 
Jackson, I. B., Rutherfordton, 

508 N. Main 



298 



Baptist State Convention 



Jackson, Ike, Robbinsville 
Jackson, R. R., Wake Forest, 

Box 609 
Jackson, J. Lamar, Southern 

Pines 
Jacobs, L. W., Pembroke 
Jacobs, R. B., Pembroke 
Jamerson, A. Z., Burnsville, 

Star Route 
Jamison, Ernest W., Sylva, Rt. 1 
James, R. C, Kannapolis, Rt. 3, 

Box 256 
James, Wade H., Kannapolis, 

310 Locust St. 
Jenkins, Clarence, Mt. Airy, 

Rt. 2 
Jenkins, J. L., Boiling Springs 
Jenkins, J. L., Fairview, Rt. 1 
Johnson, C. R., Fayetteville, 

115 Burns St. 
Johnson, C. J., Goldston 
Johnson. Guy E., Forest City 
Johnson, J. Jeter, Cherokee 
Johnson, J. McRay, Walnut Cove 
Johnson, J. C, Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 6 
Johnson, J. S., Fairmont, Box 337 
Johnson, J. Samuel, Durham, 

405 N. Hyde Park 
Johnson, Lester C, Hays 
Johnson, L. L., Magnolia 
Johnson, M. M., Raleigh, Rt. 2 
Johnson, Noah, Todd 
Johnson, Talmadge, Newton 
Johnson, T. F., Bolivia, Box 286 
Johnson, R. A., Conway, S. C. 
Johnson, W. I., Ayden 
Johnson, Walt N., Raleigh, 

417 N. Blount 
Johnson, W. O., Tavlorsville, 

Rt. 2 
Johnson, W. O., St. Pauls, Rt. 1 
Jolley, Charles, Swannanoa 
Jones, Broadus E., Raleigh, 

First Baptist Church 
Jones, Crate, Littleton, Rt. 1 
Jones, Dayton N., Heaton 
Jones, H. B., Boger City 
Jones. J. B., Forest City, Rt. 2 
Jones, J. Clarence. Newell 
Jones, J. L., Kenly 
Jones, Sam, White Plains 
Jones, Troy E., Carrboro 
Jones, W. L., Wake Forest 
Jones, W. S., Shelby, Rt. 4 
Jones, Woodrow, Mt. Airy, Rt. 4 
Jones, W. W., Lenoir, Rt. 9 
Jones, W. C, Wake Forest 
Jones, Virgil, Balfour 



K 



Jordan, E. G., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 3 
Jordan, L. R., Liberty 
Joyce, J. A., Sandy Ridge, Rt. 1 
Joyner, N. S., Waxhaw, Rt. 2 
Justice, Franklin, Marion, 

East Marion Station 
Justice, H. H., Marion, Rt. 3 
Jurney, Fred, Mount Airy 
Kanipe, L. M., Charlotte, Rt. 7, 

Box 160B 
Keaton, T. C, Winston-Salem, 

2522 Greenway Ct. 
Keller, E. C, Dunn, Rt. 1 
Keller, Roy D., Danville, Va., 

Rt. 4 
Keller, W. E., Hickory, Rt. 4 
Kellv, Fred L., Wilmington, East 
Kendall, M. H., Mars Hill 
Kerley, I. E., Greensboro, 

113 Robbins 
Key, Lee, Copperhill, Tenn. 
Kidd, J. C, Bennett 
Kilpatrick, G. W., Copperhill, 

Tenn. 
Kilstrom, E. A., Penrose 
Kincheloe, J. W., Rocky Mount 
King, Bascom K., Steeds 
King. L. M., Elon College, Rt. 1 
King, R. Von, Greensboro, 

1307 Summit Ave. 
King. Julian H., Littleton 
King, T. H., Wilmington, 

Winter Park, Rt. 2 
King, Early, Warren 
Kinlaw, B. J., Wake Forest 
Kirk, J. E., Reidsville, Rt. 2 
Kirk, T. Frank, Gold Hill 
Kirstein, M. L., Biltmore, 

32 Sayles Road 
Kiser, A. M., Waco 
Kiser, W. R., Salisbury, Rt. 1 
Kizer, M. A., Weaverville 
Kizer, John I., Boonville 
Knight. B. B., Roxboro 
Kizer, R. L., Thomasville 
Knight, Calvin S., Durham, 

205 Watts St. 
Knight, A. Frank. Hudson, Rt. 1, 

Box 120 
Knight, Eugene, Wadesboro 

night, John H., Durham, Rt. 4 
Knight, Ralph W., Durham, 

107 W. Club Blvd. 
Kreamer. C. W., Halifax 
Lail, James R., Tavlorsville, 

Rt. 2 
Lake, J. Tilman, Wadesboro, 

Box 125 



of North Carolina 



299 



Lale, Albert, Connelly Springs, 

Rt. 1 
Lamb, S. N., Whiteville 
Lambert, H. Fletcher, Leaksville, 

Box H, Branch Blvd. 
Lambert, John Wesley, Mt. Olive 
Lamm, Albert S., Pollocksville 
Lamm, S. L., Bryson City 
Landreth, Charlie, Greensboro, 

Rt. 8 
Laney, W. C, Brookford 
Lanier, C. P., Charlotte, 

425 McDonald Ave. 
Lanier, J. E., Winton 
Lanier, R. C., Rocky Mount, 

113 W. Ridge St. 
Lankford, Elijah, Brown 

Summit, Rt. 2 
Lanning, J. C, Norlina 
Lanning, Otis, Walkertown 
Larkins, Dennis M., Raleigh, 

3005 Mayview 
Larsen, Neils, Asheville, 

Box 2053 
Larrimore, A. C, Winston- 
Salem, Rt. 7 
Laudermilch, W. A., Spencer, 

213 Fifth St. 
Laughridge, B. H., Whiteville, 

R.F.D. 
Lawing, E. R., Glenwood, Rt. 1, 

Box 93A 
Lawrence, T. S., Cliffside 
Laws, Taft, Lenoir, Rt. 5 
Loy, J. W., Jr., Salisbury, Rt. 3 
Ledford, A. V., Gastonia, Rt. 2 
Ledford, A. B., Brasstown 
Ledford, Claude, Prentiss 
Ledford, Lester, Prentiss 
Ledford, Floyd, Bakersville, Rt. 
Leek, Chas. F., Thomasville 
Leonard, W. M., Bennett, Rt. 2 
Leppard, Leroy, Rutherfordton, 

Box 392 
Lewis, G. Carl, Wilmington 

206 Central Blvd. 
Lewis, W. H., Wake Forest 
Lewis, M. L., Hazelwood 
Lindner, Kenneth M., Fayette- 

ville, 708 Pilot Ave. 
Lindsey, J. Garfield, Luck 
Lineberger, T. A., Mount Holly 
Liner, G. T., Jacksonville 
Liner, Ray S., Charlotte, 
127 Woodlawn Ave. 
^Link, John R., Mars Hill 
' Linville, Ray, Morganton 
Lipe, G. F., Durham, 

802 Second St. 
Lippard, W. P., Lincolnton, Rt. 4 



Lister, W. F., Rutherfordton 
Littlejohn, F. W., Winston-Salem 
Littleton, B. B., Gastonia, 

Pinkney Station 
Lloyd, R. C, Statesville, Rt. 5 
Lockamy, E. P., Barnesville 
Lockee, A. A., Icard 
Locklear, C. E., Pembroke 
Locklear, Purcell, Fairmont 
London, J. Troy, Reidsville, Rt. 5 
Long, E. A., Germanton, Rt. 7 
Long, Joe Mack, Coats 
Long, O. S., Kings Mountain, 

Rt. 2 
Long, Raymond, Charlotte, 
2805 Ruckaseigee Road 
Long, Samuel, Monroe, Rt. 2 
Long, W. N., Belmont 
Lovingood, Paul, Fairview 
Lovell, A. B., Hiawassee, Ga. 
Lowder, D. H., Maysville 
Lowder, H. C, Rocky Mount, 

708 Arlington St. 
Luckadoo, W. T., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 1 
Luck, W. S., Wilkesboro, Rt. 1 
Ludlum, Lewis E., Shelby, 

Box 534 
Luffman, John, Ronda 
Luffman, T. M., Jonesville 
Luffman, W. B., North 

Wilkesboro, Rt. 2 
Lundy, W. M., Monroe, 

408 E. Huston St. 
Lunsford, Drew, Suit 
Lunsford, A. F., Suit 
Lunsford, Reid, Candler, Rt. 3 
Luther, Clyde E., Winston-Salem 
Lynch, Louis H., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 3 
Lynch, W. L., Durham 
McAlister, T. G., Caroleen, 

Box 180 
McBride, Charles J., High Point, 

Box 249 
McCauley, S. F., Brevard, 

Box 402 
McCall, A. C, Bunnlevel 
McCall, Ernest, Brevard 
McCall, S. B., Lake Toxaway, 

Rt. 1 
McClain, Howard, Buies Creek 
McLean, Ralph E., Raleigh, 

Meredith College 
McLeod, J. A., Mars Hill 
McCluney, J. L., Henrietta 
McClure, L. A., Alexis, Rt. 1 
McConnell, Charles B., 

Franklinton 
-McCready, John D., Morganton 



300 



Baptist State Convention 



McCrimmon, John H., Zebulon, 

Rt. 4 
McCullock, R. R., Clinton, Rt. 2 
McDaniel, E. L., Rt. 1, 

Mooresboro 
McElreath, Fate M., Leicester, 

Rt. 2 
McGee, W. K., Winston-Salem, 

Baptist Hospital 
McGinnis, H. M., Pineville 
McGinnis, O. L., Morganton, Rt. 3 
McGinnis, W. F., Ellenboro, Rt. 2 
McGuire, J. W., Brevard, Rt. 2 
Mclver, Ben J., Burnsville 
Mclntyre, Donald, Fayetteville, 

Rt. 5 
McKinney, Carl, Marion, Box 482 
McKneely, Thomas W., Durham, 

1211 Second St. 
McLain, M. S., Kannapolis, 

203 S. Walnut St. 
McLeod, Spencer, Cranberry 
McMahan, Birs, Micaville 
McMahan, P. L., Burnsville 
McMahan, W. F., Marion, Rt. 4 
McManus, O. W., Gibson 
McMurray, E. W., Yadkin ville 
McPhela, Cecil, Lenoir 
McQueen, J. C, Jr., Red Springs, 

General Delivery 
McSwain, W. L., Glen Alpine, 

Box 18 
Mabry, V. L., High Point, Rt. 3 
Mace, R. G., Catawba, Rt. 2 
Madaris, Ed, Asheboro 
^Maddry, Charles, Wilmington, 

Larkin St. 
Malone, Frank H., 1108 W. 

Franklin Ave., Gastonia 
Maness, B. L., Carthage, Rt. 1 
Mangum, O. R., Lenoir 
Mann, H. H., Canton, Rt. 1 
Manuel, J. F., Germanton, Rt. 2 
Manuel, M. E., Winston-Salem, 

816 W. 16th St. 
Marcus, Clyde, Clyde 
Marr, W. W., Hickory, 28% St. 
Marshall, F. H., Durham, 

313 Alexander Ave. 
Marsh, L. T., Wake Forest, 

Box 258 
Marshbanks, H. E., Highlands 
Marshburn, R. F., Salemburg 
Martin, A. C, Forest Cty, Rt. 1 
Martin, A. M., Ellenboro. Rt. 1 
Martin, Sim, Young Harris, Ga. 
Martin, V. C, Hickory, 

1424 Springs St. 
Mason, Joe, Asheville, 

248 Brevard Road 



Masteller, H. K., Asheboro, 

1006 Sunset Ave. 
Mason, L. A., Alexander 
Massie, Will, Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Massingale, J. C, Cowarts 
Matheny, H. G., Concord, 

735 Wil-Mar Drive 
Matheny, C. C, Erlanger 
Matthews, Levi, Smokemont 
Matheson, Ralph, Robbinsville 
Matthews, Luther J., Winston- 
Salem, 2328 Greenway Ave. 
Mauney, Carl G., Enka 
Mauney, J. Lloyd, Red Springs 
Maxwell, F. C, Erwin 
Mayberry, R. F., Morganton, 

Rt. 4 
Maynor, C. H., Red Springs, Rt. 2 
Maynor, Roy, Pembroke, Rt. 3 
Medlin, D. J., West Mills 
Medlin, J. M., Charlotte, 

2340 Laburnum Ave. 
Mehaffey, R. R., Leicester, Rt. 1 
Mehaffey, Ernest, Mars Hill 
Mehaffey, George, Waynesville 
Meigs, J. C, Polkton 
Meece, Jessie, Rosman 
Melton, E. L., Salisbury, 

1612 N. Lee St. 
Melton, N. A., Columbus 
Melton, R. G., Forest City, Rt. 1 
Melton, Robert C, Cerro Gordo 
^-Memory, J. I., Randleman 
Merrill, Hugh, Shelby, Rt. 4 
Merrill, Norman, Mars Hill 
Merritts, Paul, Holly Ridge 
Messer, Homer, Lenoir 
Middleton, H. K., Sherwood 
Middleton, John T., Fletcher 
Middleton, J. Leonard, 

Hendersonville 
Milburn, Boyd P., Charlotte 2, 

211*2 N. Tryon St. 
Miller, A. F., White Top, Va. 
Miller, Coy R., Gold Hill, Rt. 1 
Miller, J. Doyle, Canton, Rt. 1 
Miller, D. C, Hays 
Miller, E. O., Moravian Falls 
Miller, Finley, Treetop 
Miller, Grant R., Jr., Kings Creek 
Miller, H. P., Durham, Rt. 1 
Miller, H. O., High Point, 

2333 Edgewood Ave. 
Miller, Lawrence A., Connelly 

Springs 
Miller, Ralph, North Wilkesboro, 

Rt. 1 
Mills, Winfred T., Monroe, Rt. 6 
Mills, Matthew F., Fayetteville, 

Veterans Hospital 



of North Carolina 



301 



Milne, W. P., Aulander 
Minton, Grady, Vilas, Rt. 1 
Mingus, S. C, Murphy 
Minton, Vilas N., Salisbury, 

Rt. 5 
Mitchell, Carlton T., Zebulon 
Mitchell, B. A., Kernersville, 

Rt. 1 
Mixon, F. Orion, Raleigh, 

809 Person St. 
Moffitt, Clyde L., Ramseur, Rt. 1 
Monk, W. R., Roxboro, 

830 S. Main St. 
Monteith, Clyde, Bryson City, 

Rt. 1 
Monroe, W. F., Shelby, 

808 Kings Road 
Moore, R. Gene, 

Lake Toxaway, Rt. 1 
Moore, Ernest W., Rockingham 
Moore, Eugene, Greenville, 

Tenn., Rt. 5 
Moore, Harry, Currie 
Moore, Guy C, Wilmington 
Moore, J. L. W., Wake Forest 
Moore, M. M., Hendersonville 
Moore, O. D., Lincolnton 
Moore, Raymond E., Mamers 
Moore, W. H., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 1 
Moose, J. D., Charlotte, 

120 South Goff St. 
Moose, Walter A., Wake Forest 
Moose, J. L. W., Wake Forest 
Morgan, E. S., Kennedy Home, 

Kinston 
Morgan, Frank W., Mars Hill, 

Rt. 1 
Morgan, H. A., Wake Forest 
Morgan, S. Lewis, Jr., Dunn 
Morgan, Quinn, Watha 
Moretz, A. E., Boone, Rt. 2 
Morris, B. E., Durham, 

2601 Hillsboro Road 
Morris, J. Alton, Murphy 
Morris, L. J., Raleigh, 

2804 Anderson Dr. 
Morris, Roy A., Sanford, 

308 NoTth Ave. 
Morris, S. T., Concord 
Morris, W. D., Scotland Neck 
Morrisett, Stephen, Boiling 

Springs 
Moss, J. B., Unaka 
Moss, W. R., Lenoir, Rt. 3 
Motley, Julian, Wake Forest 
Mull, J. O., Vale, Route 3 
Mumford, H. S., Matthews 
Munn, Lonnie D., Badin 
Murray, Everette, Candler, Rt. 1 



Murray, J. Gray, Cary 
Mustian, A. P., Colerain, Rt. 1 
Myers, Donald G., Reidsville 
Myers, L. E., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 7 
Myrick, C. W., Fayetteville, 

Box 133 
Nail, L. A., Burlington, Rt. 6 
Nance, Henry E., Marshville 
Nash, H. E., Boone 
Naylor, Fernie, Salemburg 
Neilson, J. A., Greenville 
New, T. G., Jr., King 
Newton, Dewey, Lawndale, Rt. 2 
Newton, L. J., Jr., Raleigh, 

Biblical Recorder Bldg. 
Nichols, Elbert G., Murphy 
Nichols, C. B., East Bend 
Nickens, P. B., Plymouth 
Nichols, Homer I., Raleigh, 

919 W. South St. 
Nichols, H. L., Durham, Rt. 4 
Nix, J. O., Satalah, Ga. 
Nix, Ralph, Edneyville 
Norman, E. C, East Bend 
Norris, C. H., Wake Forest 
Nuckles, R. O., Colfax, Rt. 1 
Oates, C. M., Thomasville 
Odum, John, Santeetlah 
Ogg, T. Earl, Andrews 
Oldham, David, High Point, Rt. 2 
Olive, L. Bun, Raleigh, 

2820 Mayview 
Olive, Eugene, Wake Forest 
Oliver, W. D., Rhodhiss 
Orr, Otis, Robbinsville 
Osborne, George, Cricket 
Osborne, Gilbert, North 

Wilkesboro 
Osborne, Mark R., Jr., 

Cullowhee , 

Osborne, Iredell, 

North Wilkesboro 
Osteen, J. E., Hendersonville, 

Rt. 4 
Ostwalt, R. B., Charlotte, 

Browns Ave., Rt. 5 
Otey, C. E., Mt. Airy 
Ousley. Carl L., Tarboro 
Outlaw, A. H., Elizabeth City 
Overcash, Roy L., Concord, 

521 Bruton Ave. 
Owens, Julius, Lake Toxaway 
Owens, M. O., Jr., Marion 
Owens, Ranzie, Glenville 
Owens, Wiley, Wolf Mountain 
Owle, DeWitt, Bryson City 
Owle, Enoch, Cherokee 
Owle, William, Cherokee 



302 



Baptist State Convention 



Oxendine, J. E., Lumberton, 

Rt. 3 
Oxford, Earl, Morganton, 

105 Center St. 
Pace, Richard, Hendersonville 
Page, W. M., Fuquay Springs 
Painter, Roby L., Balm 
Palmer, Jack, Murphy, Rt. 2 
Pardue, Lloyd J., Elkin 
Pardue, R. J., Jonesville 
Parham, Clyde, Asheville, Rt. 1 
Parham, E. T., Madison 
Parham, Otto, Balfour 
Parham, J. W., Huntersville, 

Box 177 
Parker, B. H., Bostic, Rt. 2 
Parker, C. C, Marion, Rt. 1 
Parker, C. E., Franklin 
Parker, E. L., Goldsboro, Rt. 1 
Parkin, W. B., South Mills 
Parks, Pervis C, Cycle 
Parnell, E. J., Troy 
Parrish, A. D., Zebulon, Rt. 2 
Parrish, Gilmer, Zebulon, Rt. 2 
Parrish, Robert, Sylva, Rt. 1 
Parris, T. H., Clyde 
Parsons, Frank, Toecane 
Paschall, Floyd, Hillsboro 
Passmore, Charles W., 

Asheville, Rt. 1 
Pate, E. W., Wilmington, 

227 Kenwood Ave. 
Pate, R. A., Bostic 
Patrick, Clarence, Wake Forest 
Paul, E. A., Lumberton, Rt. 5 
Payne, W. C, Blowing Rock 
Peacock, C. B., Whitakers, 

Box 112 
Pearce, J. Winston, Durham, 

911 W. Markham Ave. 
Pearson, J. E., Dobson 
Peek, Avery, Canton, Rt. 2 
Peek, Wayne, Tuxedo 
Poole, Henry J., Pinetown 
Peeler, B. F., Patterson 
Pegram, C. M., Elizabeth City, 

Rt. 4 
Pegram, M. A., Zebulon, Rt. 2 
Pennell, George T., 

Hendersonville 
Penninger, W. H., Kannapolis, 

Rt. 2 
Perkinson, S. J., Asheville, 

YMCA 
Pernell, J. H., Wake Forest, 

Box 342 
Perry, Edwin F., Rockingham 
Pettit, W. E., Winston-Salem, 

Ardmore Baptist Church 
Pharr, Will, Canton, Rt. 2 



Phelps, W. G., Wilmington 
Phillips, C. E., Gastonia, Box 324 
Phillips, Lee A., Marshallburg 
Phillips, N. B., Rutherfordton 
Phillips, Ralph S., Winston- 
Salem, Rt. 7 
Phipps, Aaron C, Rolesville 
Phipps, Paul, Crumpler 
Pickler, J. M., Monroe, 

305 Lydia St. 
Pickler, C. L., Matthews, Rt. 3 
Pierce, Rommie, Wingate 
Pinnix, Lucius C, Kings 

Mountain 
Pipes, J. C, Asheville, Rt. 1 
Pipes, W. C, Franklin, Rt. 4 
Plemmons, E. V., 

Hendersonville, Rt. 5 
Poe, W. D., Oxford 
Poarch, Getter R., 

Connelly Springs 
Ponder, R. D., Buckner 
Ponder, Lloyd, Mars Hill, Rt. 1 
Poole, Charles J., Oakwoods 
Poole, W. H., Smithfield, Rt. 1 
Poole, William A., Burgaw 
Pope, Ellis, Sneads Ferry 
Pope, Clayton, Wingate 
Poplin, Fred, Fletcher 
Potter, James S., Statesville 
Powell, E. G., East Gastonia 
Powell, E. M., Henderson, 

Box 395 
Powers, Everette W., West 

Jefferson 
Powers, J. L., Benson, Rt. 2 
Powers, J. L., Elkin 
Powers, Oscar L., Scotland Neck 
Prevatte, Archie C, Chadbourn 
Privette, H. A., Shelby, Box 112 
Prince, Clyde, Loris, S. C. 
Price, B. H., Southport 
/Price, Gordon, L., Roanoke 

Rapids 
Price, J. Lewis, Hickory, 

41st St. 
Price, John B., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Prickett, Carlton, Burlington, 

First Baptist Church 
Price, W. S., Brevard 
Pridgen, Lee, Louisburg, 

Box 306 
Prince, C. C, Lewisville 
Proctor, T. G., Henderson, Rt. 4 
Propst, C. W., Charlotte, Rt. 4 
Pruitt, J. G., Elkin 
Puckett, Joe R., Smithfield 
Puette, J. R., Hickory, 11th Ave. 
Pulley, Odell W., Erwin 
Pyatt, J. Sam, Nebo, Rt. 1 



of North Carolina 



303 



Queen, Solomon, Cherokee 
Quick, H. A., Vale, Rt. 2 
Raby, M. H., Canton, Box 171 
Rainey, L. J., Fayetteville, 

1079 Southern Ave. 
Ramsey, J. W., Valdese 
Ratlifr, Will, Cherokee 
Ray, Ben Lee, Avondale 
Ray, Elzie, Burnsville, Rt. 1 
Ray, J. B., Roaring River 
Ray, J. C, Monroe, 

Box 331, Rt. 6 
Ray, James W., Raleigh, 

119 Hillsboro St. 
Ray, Z. G., Stedman, Box 57 
Reavis, M. F., Yadkinville 
Redding, Earl M., Gastonia, 

Rt. 2 
Redding, L. G., Old Fort, 

Box 345 
Redwine, Richard K., Mt. Airy 
Reece, W. Cecil, Marshall, Rt. 2 
Reese, Paul, Statesville, Rt. 1 
Reese, N. W., Morganton, Rt. 3 
Reed, Frank, Highlands 
Reed, W. C, Kinston, 

Kennedy Home 
Reel, O. B., Mt. Holly, Rt. 1 
Reep, Clyde R., Iron Station, 

Rt. 1 
Reeves, E. C, Roseboro, Rt. 1 
Reid, B. W., Tryon, Rt. 1 
Renegar, G. Elmo, Winston- 
Salem, P.O. Box 106 
Renegar, Lowell, Yadkinville 
Rhinehart, I. A., Clyde, Rt. 1 
Rhinehardt, W. G., Gastonia, 

Rt. 1 
Rhymer, R. Hugh, Alexander, 

Rt. 1 
Rhyne, C. A., Salisbury 

South Main 
Rhyne, P. M., Dallas 
Rhyne, S. A., Lumberton, 

Box 66 
Rice, Henry, Alexander, Rt. 1 
Rice, Claude, Fletcher 
Rice, R. E., Virgilina, Virginia 
Rich, Thomas L., Jr., Garland 
Richman, George, High Point, 

Rt. 1 
Richardson, J. A., High Shoals 
Richardson, Charlie, 

North Wilkesboro, Rt. 2 
Riddle, A. R., Greensboro, 

1530 Tucker St. 
Riddle, S. L., Greensboro, 

2218 Shober St. 
Riggan, J. W., Macon, Rt. 2 
Riggins, Reece D., Cordova 



Riley, C. J., Cheraw, S. C. 
Rimmer, W. W., Lincolnton, 

9 W. Church 
Rimmer, W. B., Troutman 
Rittenhouse, W. H., Jr., 

Hillsboro 
Roach, E. C, Denton 
Roach, J. F., Wendell, Rt. 2 
Roark, Keen C, Creston 
Robbins, Woodrow W., 

High Point, 914 Dayton 
Roberson, William T., Salisbury 
Roberts, David B., Marshall, 

Rt. 2 
Roberts, Eugene L., Pikeville 
Roberts, Fred C, Granite Falls 
Roberts, George A., 

Hendersonville, Rt. 1 
Roberts, Lawrence, Shelby, Rt. 5 
Roberts, Ray E., 

Winston-Salem, Rt. 3 
Roberts, S. H, Wilson, Rt. 1 
Roberts, W. A., Hendersonville, 

213 Fleming St. 
Robinson, J. P., Gilreath 
Robinson, Frank, Marion 
Robinson, W. Earl, St. Pauls 
Rogers, Clarence B., Mars Hill 

Rt. 1 
Rogers, C. F., Biltmore, 

227 Summit St. 
Rogers, Earle J., Seaboard 
Rogers, Hobart, Asheville, Rt. 2 
Rogers, L. J., Canton, Rt. 2 
Rogers, Odie G., Hayesville 
Rogers, W. S., Robbinsville 
Rogers, Wade, Taylorsville, Rt. 
Rose, Theodore, Brevard, 

Box 282 
Ross, M. J., Tryon 
Rotan, Z. W., Gastonia, 

Victory Station 
Roustio, Edward, Belmont 
Royal, C. N., Durham, 

Angier Ave. 
Royster, C. L., Cooleemee 
Ruff, Wade F., Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 1 
Ruffin, C. E., Broadway 
Russell, W. G., Mount Holly, 

Box 441 
Russell, W. J., Albemarle, Rt. 1 
Ruth, W. D., Asheville, 

183 Riverview 
Sailors, L. E., Mooresboro, Rt. 1 
Salmons, Thomas, Wilbar 
Sargeant, A. G., Charlotte, 

3100 Morson St. 
Sasser Lonnie, Murfreesboro 



304 



Baptist State Convention 



Sasser, T. L., Greensboro, 

Box 2249 
Sawyer, C. D., Canton, Rt. 1 
Sawyer, Emmett, Buies Creek 
Sawyer, W. K., Campobello, 

S. C. 
Scarborough, C. E., Tryon 
Scarlett, R. E., Hillsboro 
Scalf, John, High Point, Rt. 5 
Scott, I. W., Canton, Rt. 1 
Scott, W. L., Durham, 

1013 Hale St. 
Scofield, Fon H., Jr., 

Wake Forest 
Scruggs, Gordon E., 

Franklin, Rt. 3 
Sears, M. O., Cary 
wSearcy, Claude, Gerton 
Seigler, O. M., Hendersonville 
Settlemyre, G. F., Central Falls 
Sexton, E. C, Rocky Mount, 

Rt. 1 
Sexton, E. Z., Lansing 
Seymour, J. A., Albemarle 
Sharpe, Lauren, New Bern 
Shaw, W. K., Lenoir 
Shearin, R. C, Greensboro, Rt. 5 
Shelton, Bernie, Toast 
Shelton, David K., Wingate 
Shepherd, Grady, 

Weaverville, Rt. 1 
Sherrin, Troy M., 

Marshville, Box 507 
Shoe, E. C, Taylorsville 
Shumaker, A. Z., Stokesdale 
Shuford, Jess N., 

Hendersonville, Rt. 1 
Shope, B. F., Santeetlah 
Shore, R. H., 

Blowing Rock, Rt. 1 
Shores, W. H., Boone 
Short, R. G., Hickory, Rt. 3, 
Sides, H. L., Lincolnton, Rt. 5 
Silvers, J. Sam, Lenoir, Rt. 5 

Box 144B 
Simms, Stewart B., Williamston 
Simmons, C. A., Mount Airy, 

Rt. 2 
Simmons, C. W., Jonesville 
Simmons, W. V., Ash 
Simms, Stewart B., Williamston 
Simpson, Claude, Monroe, Rt. 2 
Simpson, John H., Concord, 

Rt. 2 
Simpson, J. Marvin, 

Kannapolis, Rt. 2 
Sims, E. T., Winston-Salem, 

123 S. Green St. 
Sinclair, W. F., Arden 



Singletary, G. M., 

Elizabeth City 
Sisk, Ernest, Lincolnton, Rt. 3 
Slagle, Claude, Toecane 
Slagle, J. J., Marshall, Rt. 2 
Slagle, T. A., Stiles 
Slade, Tom, Winston-Salem, 

880 Lockland Ave. 
Slaton, Wayne, Wake Forest 
Sledge, W. C, Lowell 
Smart, John H., 

Connelly Springs, Rt. 1 
Smith, Ard, Swannanoa, Rt. 1 
Smith, A. J., Goldsboro 
Smith, Anson, Ash 
Smith, M. Ernest, Shelby, Rt. 4 
Smith, Dock, Cherokee 
Smith, Henry H., Deep Gap 
Smith, Horace L., Canton 
Smith, J. Marvin, Rockingham 
Smith, J. T., Henderson, Rt. 1 
Smith, L. P., Hayesville 
Smith, J. H., Biltmore, 

56 Ridgecrest 
Smith, Malbert, Stoneville 
Smith, M. D., Candler, Rt. 1 
Smith, R. L., High Point, 

613 Woodbury St. 
Smith, R. L., Glenwood 
Smith, R. Talmage, 

Henderson, Rt. 1 
Smith, Richard, Draper 
Smith, Silas C, Mt. Airy, Rt. 4 
Smith, W. T., Murphy, Rt. 2 
Smith, Wiley, Boone 
Smith, W. L., High Point, 

116 Springfield 
Smith, W. R., Greensboro, Rt. 1 
Snipes, Luther E., Morganton, 

Rt. 1 

Snow, Brady, Low Gap 
Snow, O. E., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 6 
Snyder, Kenneth, Boiling 

Springs 
Snyder, Melvin, Whittier 
^Soderman, Lowell F., Clinton 
Sorrells, W. L., Franklin, 

Rt. 1, Box 52A 
Sothers, H. L., Pisgah Forest 
Southern, W. E., Winston-Salem, 

1815 E. 25th St. 
Sparks, L. E., Moxley 
Spivey, E. L., Charlotte, 

220 W. Kingston Ave. 
Splawn, J. W., Henrietta 
Sprinkle, A. P., Asheville, Rt. 4 
Sprinkle, E. F., Marion, Rt. 2 



of North Carolina 



305 



Sprinkle, W. B., Morganton, 

225 Hogan St. 
Spry, C. N., Cool'eemee 
Squirrel, Shepherd, Cherokee 
Stafford, I. K., Buies Creek 
Stafford, J. T., Lowell 
Staley, Alfred E., Albemarle 
Staley, T. E., Albemarle, Rt. 1 
Stallings, T. C, Concord, 

244 Liberty St. 
Stallings M. W., Lenoir, Rt. 2 
Stansberry, J. S., Murphy 
Stanberry, Thomas, Seymour 
-Stancil, J. N., Wendell 
Stanfield, C. H., Burlington, 

201 Highland Ave. 
Stankwytch, R. A., Lumberton, 

Rt. 2 
Starling, H. R., Roxboro 
Starnes, Nane, Asheville, 

40 Blue Ridge Ave. 
Starnes, Arlie, Albemarle 
Stegall, J. F., Clemmons, Rt. 1 
Steen, T. Harold, Louisburg, 

Rt. 4 
Stembridge, H. H., Forest City, 

301 W. Main St. 
Stephens, A. P., Lumberton, Rt. 5 
Stephens. Edgar G., 

21 Spruce St., Canton 
Stephens, G. Van, Warsaw 
Stephens, Nando L., Waynesville, 

Rt. 1 
Stephens, Charles, Wake Forest 
Stephens, W. R., Elizabeth City, 

704 Hunter St. 
Stephenson, W. J., Wilmington, 

1810 Market St. 
Stevens, Charles E., Mt. Gilead 
Stevens, Charles H., Winston- 
Salem, 432 S. Broad St. 
Stewart, E. R., Hamilton 
Stewart, G. W., Culberson 
Stiles, Fred, Murphy, Rt. 2 
Stiles, Noah, Suit 
Stillwell, Jason, Hickory, Rt. 4 
Stockton, Charles, Luck 
Stone, Thurman B., Benson 
Story, Richard, Lenoir, Rt. 5 
Stoudemire, A. T., Cleveland 
Street, J. L., Nebo, Rt. 2 
Strickland, B. M., Forest City, 

Rt. 1 
Strickland, C. M., Steeds 
Strickland, H. S., Wilmington, 

Rt. 1 
Strickland, R. W., Whiteville, 

Rt. 2 
Stringfield, P. C, Mars Hill 

20 



Stokes, Paul C, Marion, 

Clinchfield Station 
Stroud, I. T., Wake Forest 
Stroupe, S. M., Connelly Springs, 

Rt. 1 
Stroup, H. M., Kannapolis, Rt. 2, 

Box 330 
Stroup, S. A., Mt. Holly, Rt. 1 
Sturgeon, Earl, Asheville, Rt. 1 
Sullivan, C. E., Charlotte, Rt. 9 
Sullivan, E. F., Hickory, 

4040 E. Highland Ave. 
Sullivan, R. C, Charlotte, 

2904 Morson Ave. 
Summerlin. J. O., Morganton, 

Box 621 
Summers, E. S., Concord, 

39 N. Spring St. 
Summey, M. M., Valdese, Rt. 1 
Summey, M. E., Rosman 
Surreth, Everette, Candler, Rt. 2 
Suttle, J. W., Shelby, 

708 W. Marion 
Swafford, Arvil, Franklin, Rt. 3 
Swett, T. M., Rowland, Rt. 1 
Swinney, G. W., Burlington, 

102 N. Ave. 
Swinson, A. J., High Point, 

Box 507 
Swinson, J. T., Burlington, Rt. 1 
Talbert, C. V., Salisbury, Rt. 3 
Talley, C. A., Winston-Salem, 

1414 E. 21st St. 
Tarlton, W. V., Concord, 

342 Kerr St. 
Taylor, A. K., Independence, Va. 
Taylor, C. R., Burgaw 
Taylor, E. C, Red Springs 
Taylor, J. Ned, Bessemer City 
Taylor, L. Bland, Raleigh, Rt. 3 
Taylor, Thomas D., Cherry ville, 

Rt. 1 
Taylor, R. J., Charlotte, Rt. 8 
Taylor, Robert, Greensboro, Rt. 8 
Teague, A. E., Manchester 
Teague, C. W., Wendell 
Teague, E. N., Fayetteville, 

333 Hawley Lane 
Teague, E. R., Hudson 
Teague, Jarvis, Seaboard 
Teague, J. U., Powellsville 
Teague, N. C, Lexington, Rt. 3 
Teel, Z. B., Durham, 

2317 East Main St. 
Teeter, J. M., Rocky Mount, 

794 Nashville Road 
Templeton, R. R., Mooresville 
Temple, D. L., Jonesville 
Terrell, W. Isaac, Oxford 
Thomas, Harry, Wake Forest 



306 



Baptist State Convention 



Thomas, Leonard, Wake Forest, 

N. College St. 
Thomas, Arthur, Lunday 
Thomas, LeRoy A., Biltmore, 

24 Ridgecrest Road 
Thomason, B. W., Brevard, 

Jordan St. 
Thompson, Calvin, Murphy 
Thompson, Coy L., Burlington, 

Rt. 4 
Thompson, H. G., Columbia 
Thompson, James R., Greens- 
boro, 1110 Glenwood Ave. 
Thompson, N. A., Jr., Winston- 
Salem, Franklin St. 
Thompson, D. C, New Hope 
Thompson, Zeb, Troy 
Tiller, Johnnie, Asheville, 

147 Asheland 
Tilley, Grover, Elkin 
Todd, L. L., Bladenboro 
Tomlinson, A. S., Louisburg, 

Box 296 
Trammel, Charles B., Troy 
Trexler, Lawson, Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Triplett, Ben, Deep Gap 
Tritt, D. B., Bennettsville, S. C, 

Box 237 
Trivett, Bynum, Sugar Grove 
Trivett, J. R., Tree Top 
Trivett, Victor, Trade, Tenn. 
Trotter, J. Arthur, Pickens, S. C, 

Rt. 1 
Truett, James L., Andrews 
Truett, W. T., Culberson 
Tucker, Frank, Clifton 
Tucker George A., Pilot 

Mountain, Rt. 2 
Tucker, Clarence, Landrum, S. C. 
Tucker, J. M., Erastus 
Turbyfill, W. M., Clarrissa 
Turner, B. S., Winston-Salem, 

Rt. 7 
Turner, C. L., Huntersville 
Turner, E. W., Mocksville 
Turner, G. Scott, Chalybeate 

Springs 
Turner, James B., Laurinburg 
Turner, J. Clyde, Greensboro, 

2601 W. Market St. 
Turner, M. M., Hallsboro 
Turner, W. D., Reidsville, Rt. 4 
Turner, W. W., Princeton 
Turner, Warren, Buies Creek 
Tuttle, Clifton, Campobello, 

S. C, Rt. 1 
Tyson, Joel S., Kannapolis, 

Box 884 
Ulrich, Ed., Jr., Ash 



Ulrich, E. E., Sr., 

Lake Waccamaw, Box 66 
Upchurch, C. A., Raleigh, 

407 E. Jones 
Upchurch, H. C, Selma, Rt. 2 
Upton, C. R., Morganton, Rt. 4 
Usry, E. G., Oxford 
Ussery, Ben B., Carolina Beach 
Vance, Clarence O., Vilas 
Vaughan, L. B., Slater, S. C. 
Vaughan, R. B., Alexander, Rt. 1 
Vause, Charles B., 104 Ridgecrest 

Rd., Rutherfordton 
Vess, L. O., Swannanoa, Rt. 1 
Vestal, Clifford, Jonesville 
Vinson, J. I., Dillard, Ga., Rt. 1 
Vipperman, J. L., Dallas 
Wade, W. S., Turnhill, Ga. 
Wagner, Felix, Spindale 
Walden, Henry E., Jr., Old Fort 
Walker, Alvin A., Newton 
Walker, B. M., Fayetteville, 

207 B. St. 
Walker, C. W., Statesville, Rt. 1 
Walker, F. G., Sparta 
Walker, J. W., Stokesdale 
Walker, Ernest M., Buies Creek 
Walker, W. E., Asheville, Rt. 1 
Walker, Roy, Cherryville, 

Box 393 
Walker, S. Guy, Forest City, 

209 Carolina Ave. 
Wallace, George H., Lumberton 
Wallace, W. M., Crouse 
Wall, R. E., Elizabeth City 
Wall, Zeno, Thomasville 
Wallin, S. M., Weaverville, Rt. 1 
Walters, H. Lloyd, Monroe, 

Box 155 
Walters, T. E., Ridgecrest 
Walton, R. M., Wilmington 
Walton, J. O., Thomasville, 

Mills Home 
Walton, W. H., Salisbury, Rt. 4 
Ward, O. E., Mt. Airy 
Warfford, Walter L., Winston- 
Salem, 300 Lockland Ave. 
Warren, Casper C, Charlotte, 

800 Queens Road 
Warren, C. M., Sylva 
Waters, A. R., Catawba 
Waters, C. S., Spot 
Watson, Cecil, Youngsville, 

Box 75 
Watson, J. N., Marsh ville 
Watson, Tom, Lenoir, Rt. 5 
Watts, A. E., Taylorsville, Rt. 2 
Watts, Berry, Arden 
Watts, S. I., Boomer 



of North Carolina 



307 



Waugh, J. H., Jr., Burlington, 

1007 Morehead St. 
-Wayland, John T., 

North Wilkesboro 
Weatherman, John, Rt. 4, 

Mt. Airy 
Weaver, R. H., Valdese 
Weaver, W. C, Alexis 
Webb, Roy, Nebo, Rt. 1 
Welch, C. C, West Mills 
Welch, Grady, Gastonia, 

Victory Station 
Wells, John L., North Wilkesboro 
Wesson, D. C, McAdenville 
West, Algia, Marble 
West, Guy, Alexander, Rt. 1 
West, R. L., Fountain 
West, R. W., Andrews, Rt. 1 
Wheeler, C. C, Merry Oaks 
Whisenhunt, Eph, Clayton 
Whisnant, J. D., Raeford 
Whitaker, J. E., Biltmore, 

41 East 
White, G. D., Statesville, Rt. 5 
White, Harvey, Talorsville, Rt. 2 
White, George W., Atkinson 
White, E. P., Rutherfordton 
Whitehurst, B. Marshall, 

Roanoke Rapids 
Whittington, Walter, Faith 
Whitlock, W. H., Candler, Rt. 2, 

Box 36A 
Whitson, Park, Bakersville 
Wiggs, James E., 

Greensboro, Box 2769 
Wilde, Joe, Marshall, Rt. 2 
Wilder, Jack B., Wake Forest 
Wilke, E. Cleveland, 

Kinston, Rt. 2 
Williams, C. W., Mooresville, 

Rt. 2 
Williams, Berely, Spindale 
Williams, J. D., Spindale 
Williams, Lewis W., 

Wadesboro, Rt. 3 
Williams, L. R., Maiden 
Williams, Lester, Franklin 
Williams, Oscar S., Elizabeth 

City 
Williams, T. H., Raleigh, Rt. 2 
Williams, Wm. Harrison, 

Charlotte, 1623 Dilworth 
Williamson, G. E., Greensboro, 

Rt. 1 
Williamson, W. D., Swansboro 
Willis, J. B., Hamlet 
Willis, Jeff, Toecane 
Willix, Edgar, Tuckaseigee 



Wilmer, E. H., Spencer, Box "G" 
Wilson, David, Cashiers 
Wilson, Paul N., Morganton, 

Rt. 3 
Wilson, Ralph A., Burlington, 

Rt. 2 
Wilson, Robert L., Hickory, Rt. 1 
Wilson, S. B., Winston-Salem, 

1005 Franklin St. 
Winkler, H. M., Todd 
Wishon, Woodrow, State Road 
Wood, A. B., Charlotte, 

2215 Plaza Road 
Wood, L. R., Boone 
Wood, Dillard, Cowarts 
Wood, Harry D., Jr., Angier 
Wood, Wyman E., Hickory, 

Brown Memorial Church 
Woodall, W. F., Lenoir 
Woodard, J. M., Hazelwood 
Woodcock, Wilson W., 

Greensboro, 508 Forest Ave. 
Woodruff, Lee, Sparta 
Woodruff, Jesse F., Mt. Airy, 

Rt. 4 
Woodson, J. F., Ashley Heights 
Woody, T. K., Jr., Caypso 
Woolweaver, L. M, Knightdale, 

Rt. 1 
Worrell, P. T., Colerain 
Wright, Dennis, Parkersburg 
Wright, D. O., Central Falls 
Wright, J. H., Gastonia, Rt. 2 
Wright, J. M., Graham, Box 45 
Wright, O. A., Charlotte, 

408 Keswick Ave. 
Wright, Paul, Asheville, 

Star Route 
Wringer, Howard, Ivy 
Wyatt, Manuel C, Waynesville, 

Rt. 1 
Wyatt, A. M., Forest City, Rt. 2 
Wright, Dennis T., Parkersburg 
Wyatt, J. D., State Road 
Yarborough, A. F., Milton 
Yates, J. Clyde, Charlotte, 

1409 Allen St. 
York, H. C, Hayesville 
Younce, C. J., Patterson 
Young, C. S., Jr., Lexington 
Young, Richard, Winston-Salem, 

Baptist Hospital 
Young, E. D., Greensboro, 

Denim Station 
Young, F. L., Maxton 
Young, Roy V., Clyde, Rt. 1 
Young, S. R., Pomona, 23 Boren 
Young, W. S., Icard, Box 101 
Younger, L. T., New Hope 



308 



Baptist State Convention 



MINISTERS ORDAINED BUT NOT ACTIVE IN THE 

PASTORATE AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION 

OF THIS VOLUME 



Abernathy, Joseph, Wingate 
Absher, A. F., Monroe, Rt. 2 
Adams, Jesse, North Wilkesboro 
Adams, J. H., Asheville 
Adams, J. Z., Traphill 
Adkins, C. C, Ramseytown 
Alderman, J. O., Chapel Hill 
Algood, A. H., Winston-Salem 
Allen, C. L., Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Allen, T. H., Raleigh 
Alley, H. M., Asheville 
Almond, H. J., Mill Springs 
Almond, W. B., Albemarle, Rt. 4 
Anderson, Carlyle, 

Black Mountain 
Anderson, J. A., Wilkesboro 
Anderson, George, Marion, Rt. 3 
Anthony, W. W., Whittier 
Arbrogant, C. P., Bryson City 
Arrington, A. C, Waynesville 
Arrington, Ellis, Canton, Rt. 2 
Arrington, W. F., Julian 
Arrowwood, J. H., 
West Asheville 
Arrowwood, Robert, Asheville 

Star Route 
Austin, L. F., Oakboro 
Bagwell, W. L., China Grove 
Bain, G. A., Hickory 
Baker, F. H., Waynesville 
Baker, J. M., Asheville 
Bales, Shady, Smokemont 
Ball, R. L., Valdese 
Ball, Riley, Bryson City 
Barber, P. S., Gastonia, 
Pinkney Station 
Barker, B. H., Roaring River 
Barker, W. F., Grassy Creek 
Barnes, L. C, Whiteville, Rt. 1 
Barnes, R. L., Boone 
Barnwell, Odell, Fletcher 
Bass, R. F., Wake Forest 
Baucom, H. W., Gastonia 
Baucom, H. W., Jr., 

Black Mountain 
Beaver, W. A., Suit 
Beck, L. P., Wingate 
Bell, W. C, Winston-Salem 
Bell, W. A., Rowland, Rt. 1 
Belton, J. O., Mt. Airy 
Bennett, Richmond, Ramseytown 
Bentley, C. H., Lenoir, Rt. 8 
Benton, Bruce, Rockingham 
Berry, Ralph, Icard 
Biles, H. C, Ellerbe 



Birchfield, D. F.. Gastonia 
Binford, J. N., Ridgecrest 
Birchfield, Gardner, Tapoca 
Bishop, Gudger, Cullowhee 
Bishop, Paul, Kings Mountain 
Black, Lloyd, Lenoir 
Blackmon, J. F., Buie's Creek 
Blackwelder, H. T., Concord 
Blake, J. M., Raleigh 
Blanton, W. A., Shelby 
Blevins, J. A., Hays 
Blevins, J. C, Grassy Creek 
Blevins, Jewel, Grassy Creek 
Blevins, L. W., Newtown, Pa. 
Blevins, T. E., Abshers 
Blevins, W. M., Celo 
Boley, Earnest, Lake Toxaway 
Bolton, R. L., Chapel Hill 
Boney, L. B., Durham 
Boone, Arthur, 

Green Mountain, Rt. 1 
Bower, F. A., Morganton 
Bradford, Monroe, Bee Log 
Bradley, S. A., Asheville, Rt. 1 
Bragg, J. L., Hildebran 
Braswell, W. A., Montezuma 
Braun, M. L., Salisbury 
Bray, B. F., 

Marion, E. Court St. 
Brandon, S. O., Buie's Creek 
Brendle, C. M., Hayesville 
Brewer, Grady, Star 
Brewington, C. D., Pembroke 
Brewington, Joseph H., 

Clinton, Rt. 1 
Brewington, M. L., Clinton 
Bridges, Lawrence J., 

Wilmington 
Bridges, Morris, Harris, Rt. 1 
Bridges, Hoyle, Robbinsville 
Briggs, W. T. C, Greenville 
Bristol, Ira, Collettsville 
Brisson, W. M., Dublin 
Britt, D. C, Whiteville 
Brooks, J. C, Granite Falls, Rt. 2 
Brittain, Nat, Ridgecrest 
Brooks, Percy, Pembroke 
Brooks, Graham, Mooresboro, 

Rt. 1 
Brown, George M., Arden 
Brown, W. T., Charlotte 
Brown, James M., Burlington 
Brown, John W., Traphill 
Bryan, Ralph, Faust 
Brown. W. F., Argura 



of North Carolina 



309 



Brown, J. M., Glenwood 
Brown, Vivian, Frank 
Brown, W. H., Bryson City 
Bryant, R. J., Winston-Salem 
Bryant, Wade H., Hickory 
Bryant, Watson, North 

Wilkesboro, Rt. 1 
Bryant, Wilbur, Wadesboro 
Buckner, J. W., Concord 
Buchanan, J. Astor, Spruce Pine 
Buchanan, Melton, Spruce Pine 
Buchanan, W. L., Bryson City 
Bryson, A. C, Balsam 
Bullis, H. A., North Wilkesboro 
Bumgarner, Alphy, Granite Falls 
Bumgarner, Frank, Cashiers 
Bunn, J. T., Morehead City 
Burcham, John, Roaring River 
Burgyn, Mack, Boiling Springs 
Burkett, R. M., Jefferson 
Burrell, C. P., Tryon 
Burrell, Dock, Argura 
Burrus, G. E., Rockford 
Burrus, L. W., Boonville 
Bushyhead, Ben, Whittier 
Butler, A. L., Ewart 
Byers, J. H., Hayesville 
Byrd, Albert, North Wilkesboro 
Byrd, Fred, Black Mountain, 

Rt. 1 
Byrd, R. L., St. Pauls 
Byrd, Willis, North Wilkesboro 
Byrum, W. J., Asheboro, Rt. 1 
Cable, Martin, Waynesville 
Caison, J. A., Rocky Mount 
Calloway, J. W., State Road 
Call, C. M., Roaring River 
Campbell, J. A., Bina 
Campbell, W. T., Fuquay Springs, 

Rt. 2 
Canady, Carlos 
Canipe, E. S., Bakersville 
Carlton, Lonnie, Triplett 
Carpenter, C. A., Spruce Pine 
Cardwell, Jesse, 

North Wilkesboro 
Carringer, Charlie, Robbinsville 
Carroll, Charles, Clayton 
Carson, W. L., Weaverville 
Carter, A. D., Garland 
Carter, J. E., Selma 
Cates, K. T., Bryson City 
Caviness, Howard, Bennett 
Champion, R. C, Tryon 
Chandler, A. R., Madison 
Chandler, T. M., Kernersville 
Chance, Sam, Hayesville 
Chaney, R. L., Kings Mountain 
Chapman, Johnny, 

East Gastonia 



Chatham, David, Union Mills 
Chavis, B. C, Rowland, Rt. 1 
Chavis, G. J., Rowland 
Chavis, John D., Laurinburg 
Chavis, Z. R., Pembroke 
Cheek, L. B.. Chapel Hill 
Childress, S. T., Hillsville, Va. 
Christmas, T. P., Charlotte 
Christopher, S. B., Lincolnton 
Church, Bine, Purlear 
Church, Noah E., Millers Creek 
Church, A. B., Boone 
Church, J. S., Summit 
Clanton, D. A., Concord 
Clark, Ben F., Kannapolis 
Clark, L. E., Canton 
Cloninger, John, Kings Mountain 
Cloud, M. G., Alexis 
Cockerham, David, Elkin 
Cockerham, T. J., Crumplei 
Cochran, Ralph, Tryon 
Coble, Addison, Mebane 
Coe, C. G., Pomona 
Coffey, W. E., Asheville 
Cogburn, T. M., Canton 
Collins, E., Cameron 
Collins, A. S., Toast 
Collins, J. Bennett, Salisbury, 

Box 10 
Collins, J. L., Wananish 
Colvard, C. W., Kannoplis 
Comer, W. T., Stony Point 
Comer, C. S., Winston-Salem 
Connor, D. H., Hickory 
Connor, W. H., Central Falls 
Conrad, A. B., High Point 
Conrad, J. J., Pfafftown 
Cook, Otis, Hickory 
Cook, Jess, Minneapolis 
Cook, Reuben, Minneapolis 
Coone, C. M., Charlotte 
Cooper, W. F., Trap Hill 
Cook, T. C, Bakersville 
Cope, C. M., North Wilkesboro 
Copeland, J. E., Windsor 
Corbett, R. I., Marion 
Coren, J. A., Brevard, Rt. 1 
Corn, J. A., Asheville, Rt. 1 
Corn, T. P., Arden 
Corn, J. W., Mars Hill 
Cornwell, R. C, Grandview 
Cornwell, Oliver, Murphy 
Cowan, G. N., Rocky Mount 
Cox, T. P., Asheville 
Cox, W. H., Wilmington 
Cox, R. E., Durham 
Crawford, D. T., Harris, Rt. 1 
Creech, A. R., Princeton 
Creech, Carmel, Kenly, Rt. 2 



310 



Baptist State Convention 



Crisp, James A., Brevard, 
Whitmire Street 

Crowder, W. P., Forest City 

Culler, B. B., Boone 

Culler, E. M., Mt. Airy 

Cullom, W. R., Wake Forest 

Curry, G. W., Traphill 

Daniels, O. C. 

Danner, T. T., Valle Crucis 

Davis, J. O., Autryville 

Davis, L. M., Alexander 

Davis, R. Lee, Winston-Salem 

Davis, Theo. B., Zebulon 

Davis, Robert 

Davis, W. H., Hendersonville, 
Rt. 4 

Day, O. C, Nantahala 

Day, Fred N., Winston-Salem 

Deitz, T. F., Sylva 

Dellinger, O. G., Bryson City 

Denny, Gilmer, Grassy Creek 
Denny, Jesse, Apple Grove 

Denton, W. V., Rocky Mount 
Dezern, H. W., Pilot Mountain 
Dodd, W. H., Mocksville 
Dollinger, R. L., Sturgills 
Dorsett, H. G., Chapel Hill 
Douglas, E. E., McGrady 
Driver, J. E., Lenoir 
Dry, C. C, Mt. Pleasant 
Duffer, H. Y., Hendersonville 
Durham, C. H., Lumberton 
Durden, C. W., Charlotte, 

1620 Park Dr. 
Dyson, C. F., Nebo 
Eastin, Paul, Wilson 
Edwards, W. L., Barnardsville 
Edwards, Sam, Salisbury 
Edge, N. B., Erwin 
Edmonds, Oscar, Marshall, Rt. 2 
Eggers, Blain, Damascus, Va. 
Eggers, Carter, Creston 
Eldridge, E. M., Elkin 
Eller, E. A., Grassy Creek 
Eller, LeRoy, Moravian Falls 
Eller, Vernon, Purlear 
Ellington, R. P., Graham 
Elliott, W. P., Robbinsville 
Elrod, J. M., Granite Falls 
Embler, J. Mitchel, Alexander, 

Rt. 1 
Ensley, Herman, Cherokee 
Evans, C. R., Maggie 
Farr, James, Santeetlah 
Farthing, E. J., Sugar Grove 
Faw, Ed, Wilkesboro 
Felts, A. M., Amelia, Va. 
Ferguson, Ralph, Sunbury 
Ferguson, W. H., Albemarle 
Finch, A., Mt. Airy 



Fish, Odie, Cove Creek 
Fisher, Robert, Cove Creek 
Fitzgerald, W. H., Asheville 
Fisher, Robert G., Gastonia 
Fletcher, R. D., White Plains 
Foster, A. J., Boomer, Rt. 1 
Foster, J. H., Wilmington 
Foster, W. O., Dahlonega, Ga., 
Frady, E. R., Biltmore 
Franks, R. G., Kings Mountain 
Freeman, Chester, Leicester, 

Rt. 2 
Freeman, Ira, Weaverville 
Freeman, Lee, Wesser 
Friday, E. W., Dallas, Rt. 1 
Gaddis, Robert, Waynesville 
Galimore, A. R., Wake Forest 
Galloway, J. C, Copperhill, 

Tenn. 
Garner, S. E., Asheville 
Gardner, W. M., Marion, Rt. 1 
Gentry, Albert, Forest City 
Gentry, Glenn E,, Elk Park 
Gentry, J. H., West Jefferson 
Gill, Everett, Sr., Wake Forest 
Gillespie, W. N., Rosman 
Gilliam, C. E., Old Port 
Godwin, Billie, Micro 
Glosson, S. C, Moncure 
Goforth, J. W., Bryson City 
Goforth, C. J., Forest City 
Gold, W. M., Ellenboro 
Goode, W. E., Scotland Neck 
Goodman, Spencer H., 

West Jefferson 
Grant, J. H., Hickory 
Green, Clayton, Shulls Mills 
Green, Dave, Vilas 
Green, J. R., Hillsboro 
Green, N. R., Stecoah 
Green, J. Y., Asheville 
Green, Oliver B., Salisbury 
Greene, Tipton, Boone 
Green, W. C, Laxon 
Greer, Raymond, Lenoir, Rt. 8 
Greer,' J. W., Granite Falls 
Greer, Hilton, Marion, Va. 
Greenway, G. T., Icard 
Grice, J. B., Asheville 
Griffiin, J. W., Charlotte 
Griffin, W. M., Alexander 
Griffiin, J. L., Concord 
Griggs, W. L., Charlotte , 

Grindstaff, Roy, Spruce Pine 
Grubb, G. G., Wake Forest 
Gulley, W. H., Chapel Hill 
Guye, C. A., Whaley 
Guy, Troy 

Gwynn, R. H., East Bend 
Hagaman, Fred, Vilas 



of North Carolina 



ill 



Hager, L. B., Alexis 

Hall, E. W., Fayetteville, Rt. 7 

Hall, R. F., Lillington 

Hall, H. M., Benson 

Hall, M. L., Murphy 

Hammonds, S. A., Lumberton, 

Rt. 2 
Hancock, Colon, Hamlet 
Haney, Richard, East Gastonia 
Hanks, Uriah, Springfield 
Hannon, S. E., West End 
Hardin, D. C, Rutherfordton 
Hargett, S. M., Rutherfordton 
Harmon, Gaither 
Harper, J. H., Louisburg, Rt. 2 
Harrell, E. J., Charlotte 
Harrell, V. H., Winston-Salem 
Harris, E. M., Southern Pines 
Harris, Carl, Morganton 
Harris, F. A., Manchester 
Harris, C. L., Mt. Airy 
Harris, J. P., Bethel 
Harris, J. S., Concord 
Hart, Jess, Black Mountain 
Harwood, G. H., Chapel Hill 
Haskett, W. E., Sylva 
Hass, L. P. 

Hatcher, W. L., Ridgecrest 
Hauser, O. H., West Field 
Hawkins, D. C, Clyde 
Hawks, Hubert, Mt. Airy 
Hayes, T. M., Nathans Creek 
Hayes, C. C, Mt. Airy 
Hayes, Odus, Shelby 
Haynes, W. L., Forest City 
Heatherly, LeRoy, Candler, Rt. 2 
Heatherly, Ben, Candler, Rt. 2 
Hedrick, Leslie, Robbinsville 
Heilig, J. A., Concord 
Helms, W. M., Monroe 
Helms, Roy, Monroe 
Henderson, A. N., Forest City 
Henderson, J. K., Scotland Neck 
Henly, Don, Linville 
Herring, A. C, Bladenboro 
Herring, R. H., Zebulon 
Hester, J. M., Elizabethtown 
Hiatt, Grover, Mt. Airy 
Hice, W. H., Granite Falls 
Hicks, T. C, Elk Park 
Hickman, G. T., Winnabow 
Hickman, T. O., Enfield 
Higgins, John, Wilkesboro 
Hightower, Philip, Little 

Switzerland 
Hildebran, Julius, Hickory, Rt. 4 
Hill, M. D., Marshville 
Hobson, J. R., Bakersville 
Hodge, Dewey, Rutherfordton 



Hodges, J. M., Blowing Rock 
Hodge, J. L., Rutherfordton 
Hodson, R. R., West Jefferson 
Hogsed, Charlie, 'Shooting Creek 
Holcomb, W. E., Statesville, Rt. 1 
Holder, Thomas, Greensboro 
Holland, Clifford, Longview 

Station 
Hollingsworth, Bobo, Henderson- 

ville, Rt. 4 
Holtzclaw, Dewey 
Holtzclaw, W. P., Hendersonville 
Honeycutt, Robert, Boone 
Honeycutt, W. W., Forest City 
Hopson, Ham, Valley 
Home, Paul, Ashland 
Horton, W. J., Raleigh 
Hornbuckle, Clifford, Cherokee 
Houck, Wade, Reddies River 
Hough, J. C, Norwood 
Howell, B. D., Mocksville 
Howell, Foy, Rutherfordton 
Hudson, Albert, Casar 
Hudgins, James D., Alexander 
Hudspeth, J. Frank, Belmont 
Hughes, Huey, Murphy 
Humphrey, D. B., Lumberton, 

Rt. 2. 
Humphrey, H. B., Kannapolis 
Huntley, B. E., Bear Wallow 
Huntley, Roscoe, Rutherfordton, 

Rt. 1 
Hurst, W. T., Pittsboro 
Hutchens, C. C, Mt. Airy 
Hutchins, Mai, Forest City 
Hutchinson, J. E., Rockingham 
Hux, Daniel, Halifax 
Hyde, H. H., Andrews 
Hyde, Orbin, Stecoah 
Ivery, G. C, Fayetteville 
James, C. J., Winston-Salem 
James, W. C, Mt. Airy 
Jamison, Thad, Sylva 
Jarrett, J. F., Lexington, Rt. 5 
Jarvis, Guy, Stocksville 
Jarvis, N. T., Roaring River 
Jenkins, P. H., Stecoah 
Johnson, A. A., North 

Wilkesboro 
Johnson, E. O., St. Pauls 
Johnson, J. T., Montgomery, Ala. 
Johnson, J. H., Bryson City 
Johnson, T. Neil, Chapel Hill 
Johnson, W. A., Smithfield 
Johnson, W. L., Union Grove 
Jolly, J. R., Jonesville 
Jolly, S. W., Whiteville 
Jones, Forest T., Goldsboro 
Jones, Lee J., Marion 
Jones, Oscar M., Raleigh 



312 



Baptist State Convention 



Jones, Oscar, Marion, 

Clinchfield Station 
Jones, Randolph, Gastonia 
Jones, S. A., North Wilkesboro 
Jones, S. L., Raleigh, Rt. 2 
Jones, W. Elvin, Winston-Salem 
Jones, Walter L., Wake Forest 
Jones, W. J., Salemburg 
Jordan, Arnold, Robbinsville 
Jordan, Alphonso, Raleigh 
Jordan, B. C, Roaring River 
Joyner, E. B., Concord 
Jumper, Ute, Whittier 
Justice, William, Southside 
Keller, L. N., Fleetwood 
Keller, O. A., Sanford 
Kelly, W. M., Wilmington 
Kendrick, R. G., Durham 
Kilby, John, North Wilkesboro, 

Rt. 1 
Kilpatrick, J. B., Balsam Grove 
Kindley, Leon, Lexington, Rt. 8 
Kinderly, J. E., Concord 
King, Hilliard, Marshall, Rt. 3 
King, J. D., Cane River 
King, Leonard, Robbinsville 
Kinnamon, John P., Shelby 
King, Luther, Elon College, Rt. 1 
Kirk, J. L., Salisbury 
Knight, C. W., Charlotte 
Knott, J. L., Winston-Salem 
Lambert, Ed, Cherokee 
Lambert, Jess, Smokemont 
Lambert, Willard, Smokemont 
Lancaster, R. F., Shelby, Rt. 4 
Lanning, T. D., Leicester, Rt. 1 
Lanning, Conrad, Linwood, Rt. 1 
Larkins, J. D., Wilmington 
Lassiter, A. J., High Point 
Lawrence, W. F., Union Grove 
Lawson, Claude, Martinsville, 

Va. 
Lawson, A. C, Greensboro, 

1016 S. Aycock 
Lawson, H. O., Ararat 
Ledford, Elain, Brasstown 
Ledford, R. B., Hayesville 
Leatherwood, Frank, 

Waynesville 
Lee, L. C, Durham 
Lee, D. S., Lenoir 
Leftwich, C. L., Low Gap 
Leggett, G. D., Windsor 
Lemmons, Paul, Raleigh 
Lennon, R. S., Wake Forest 
Lindsay, H. F., Morehead City 
Lindsey, W. G., Hendersonville, 

Rt. 1 
Lineberger, C. A., Alexis 
Liner, J. R.. Charlotte 



Little, Luther, Charlotte 
Little, T. P., Marsh ville 
Livingston, E. A., Staley 
Locklear, Wade, Red Springs 
Locust, Arthur, Bryson City 
Long, Dwight, Candler 
Lovingood, Connely, Grandview 
Lowery, S. S., Pembroke 
Lova, Hoyle, Unionville 
Lovelace, A. C, Black Mountain 
Lucas, R. H., Plymouth 
Lynch, W. C, Rutherfordton 
Lynch, George, Mill Springs 
Lyon, J. F., Traphill 
McCall, Clyde, Lake Toxoway 
McCann, Levi, Roaring River 
McCarter, Jesse, Raleigh 
McCarter, P. W., King 
McClellan, W. M., Spruce Pine 
McClure, Leonard, Murphy 
McCrary, Willard, Hayesville 
McCurray, Arthur, Bryson City 
McDaniel, J. R., Raleigh 
McDaniel, T. C, Connelly 

Springs 
McDuffie, J. F., Chapel Hill 
McFalls, Arnold, Marion 
McFalls, W. T., Candler 
McGuire, J. T., Altapass 
McGuire, V. V., Asheville 
McHorn, S. L., West Asheville 
Mclntyre, S. L., Oakboro 
McKeithan, W. H., Southport 
McKinney, Paul, Toecane 
McKinney, Hubert, Nebo, Rt. 1 
McMillan, E. F., Lenoir 
McMillan, J. A., Thomasville 
Maddry, C. E., Chapel Hill, 

216 Wilson Court 
Mainwaring, C. W., Henderson- 
ville 
Maness, O. T., Robbins, Rt. 2 
Mann, Marvin, Canton, Rt. 2 
Mann, Lester G., Durham, Rt. 4 
Mann, W. H., Charlotte 
Mann, W. M., Mooresville, Rt. 1 
Mann, W. F., Charlotte 
Maier, F. A., Thomasville 
Marion, T. G., Dobson 
Marshall, O. N., Elizabeth City 
Martin, C. F., Andrews 
Martin, G. A., Thomasville 
Martin, L. M., Winston-Salem 
Martin, N. A., Candler 
Martin, Verlon, Hayesville 
Mason, Herbert, Topton 
Mason, B. K., Winston-Salem 
Mason, Dewitt, Topton 
Mason, J. P., Asheville 
Massengill, Willis Paul, Erwin 



of North Carolina 



313 



Mathis, Wayne, Whittier 
Mathis, Ben, Marion, 

Clinchfield Station 
Matthews, G. S., Canton, Rt. 1 
May, George W., Red Oak 
Matthews, N. J., Pilot Mountain 
Mayberry, O. B., North 

Wilkesboro 
Maynor, Dawley, Pembroke 
Medford, A. T., Canton 
Mehaffey, W. H., Canton, Rt. 2 
Melton, Sterling, Argura 
Mendenhall, Glenn, Jonesville 
Messer, Kennedy, Candler, Rt. 1 
Middleton, J. B., Saluda 
Midles, C. B., East Bend 
Miller, A. L., Wallace 
Miller, Broadus, Andrews 
Miller, C. A., Marion 
Miller, Fate, Hudson 
Miller, J. E., Graham 
Miller, Lee, Purlear 
Miller, Smith, Jefferson 
Mills, Adam, Marion 
Minton, B. L., Buck 
Minton, J. C, Cricket 
Mintz, M. L., Shallotte 
Mintz, S. I., Leland 
Monteith, Odell, Whittier 
Moore, J. W., Gilreath 
Moore, H. C, Ridgecrest 
Moore, S. F.,Fairview 
Moore, Richard, Brevard 
Morehead, W. R., Concord 
Morgan, Lewis, Rosman, Rt. 1 
Morgan, C. R., Norton 
Morgan, S. L., Wake Forest 
Morgan, W. B., Zirconia 
Morris, D. P., Norwood 
Morrison, W. M., Roaring River 
Morton, Joe, Bristol, Va. 
Mott, Marshall, Black Mountain 
Mull, George, Morganton, Rt. 3 
Mulkey, J. L., Murphy 
Mull, Jo, Vale, Rt. 3 
Mullin, H. K., Wilmington 
Mull, George, Jonas Ridge 
Mullis, W. O., Jefferson 
Mull, R. W., Landis 
Mumford, E. F., Spring Hope 
Murray, Howard, Asheville, Rt. 4 
Murray, L. B., State Road 
Myers, A. E., Winston-Salem 
Myers, Guy, Cycle 
Myers, Moses, Winston-Salem 
Nelson, J. H., Lenoir, Rt. 5 
New, C. H., Newland 
Newsome, J. C. Mt. Airy 
Nichols, James T., Wilkesboro, 

Rt. 1 



Nichols, Hugh L., Durham 
Neilson, A. J., Hendersonville 
Nix, J. J., Rutherfordton, Rt. 3 
Noah, Jesse L., Thomasville, Rt. 1 
Norville, J. M., Boiling Springs 
Nunnally, M. A., Marion 
Odem, W. C, Clinton 
L'Flaherty, J. C, Wake Forest 
Oldham, S. W., Star 
Ollis, Jake, Plumtree 
Ollis, Dorris 
O'Hara, J. W.,Candler 
L'Neill, G. G., Rutherfordton 
L'Neal, J. L., Mt. Airy 
Orr, Oliver, Santeetlah 
Orr, Finley, Hendersonville 
Osborne, Ray, Fig 
Otter, Andrew, Whittier 
Owens, D. C, Lake Toxaway 
Owen, Dillard, Balsam Grove 
Owenby, J. W., Hendersonville 
Owens, Robert, Rutherfordton 
Owen, C. F., Canton 
Oxendine, C. F., Pembroke 
Pace, Edmund, Zirconia 
Padgett, Rush, Shelby, Rt. 4 
Page, B. R., Wake Forest 
Page, J. M., Raleigh 
Paige, Roy, Hickory 
Parham, A. H., Candler 
Parker, Earl, Scotland 
Parker, Harry, Hildebran 
Parker, Lonas, Candler, Rt. 1 
Parker, W. B., Canton, Rt. 1 
Parsons, J. A., Purlear 
Patterson, J. J., Whittier 
Payne, W. A., Boomer 
Peacock, A. T., Bladenboro 
Pearson, Sherman, Cedar Moun- 
tain 
Pegg, Fred, Candler, Rt. 1 
Pegram, J. E., Walkertown 
Pelphrey, J. G., Asheville 
Pendleton, E. R., Brevard 
Pendry, O. R., Siloam 
Perry, H. J., Raleigh 
Phillips, A. W., Concord 
Phillips, Eugene, Tolivar 
Phillips, Fred, Hayesville 
Phillips, G. C, Bennett 
Phillips, Hiram, Trout 
Phillips, Joe, Pineola 
Phillips, J. H., Andrews 
Phillips, B. M., Toast 
Phillips, M. S., Lenoir 
Phillips, W. C, Warsaw 
Philyaw, Roy, Glove 
Philpott, Harry, Gainesville, Ga. 
Phipps, Roy, Asheville 
Plemmons, B. B., Luck 



314 



Baptist State Convention 



Powlman, K. L., Richfield, Rt. 1 
Ponder, N. L., Brevard, Rt. 2 
Porch, Baine, Granite Falls 
Potter, F. P., Supply 
Poteat, W. H., Chapel Hill 
Powers, Arthur, Lansing 
Preslar, Clyde, Marshville, Rt. 3 
Pressley, Harvey, Skyland 
Price, A. O., Hayesville 
Price, John E., Waynesville, Rt. 2 
Pruitt, A. C, North Wilkesboro 
Pruitt, J. C, North Wilkesboro 
Pruitt, W. M., Waynesville 
Pruett, Gar, Elkin 
Pruett, Rowland S., Durham, 

Duke University 
Pugh, R. L., New Bern 
Pyatte, Jeff, Minneapolis 
Quinn, R. P., Hendersonville 
Raines, F. A., Rosman 
Raley, Truman, Army 
Ray, Barnette, Celo 
Ray, Roy, Lenoir, Rt. 9 
Redmon, W. H., Kings Mountain 
Reese, B. B., Marion, Clinchfield 

Station 
Reece, A. V., Hendersonville 
Reese, D. G., Jonesville 
Reed, Green, Toliver 
Reece, Tom, Boiling Springs 
Revels, J. A., Hickory 
Rhymer, O. S., Waynesville 
Riddle, Edd, Burnsville, Rt. 1 
Riddle, Ray, Burnsville, Rt. 1 
Riddle, J. L., Advance 
Rice, LeRoy, Marshall, Rt. 3 
Risner, H. C, Winston-Salem 
Roach, T. H., Lincolnton 
Robbins, J. W., Sharpsburg 
Robbins, T. S., Deep Gap 
Robertson, Edward, Fletcher 
Robertson, C. H., Leaksville 
Robertson, James, Mooresville 
Roberson, Jesse, Murphy 
Roberts, C. C, Mount Holly 
Roberts, H. M., Gastonia 
Roberts, J. W., Asheville 
Roberts, Richard, Alexander 
Robinson, Elzie, Bee Log 
Robinson, Roland, Lake Toxa- 

way, Rt. 1 
Rogers, A. T., Tabor City 
Rogers, J. E., Cheoah 
Rogers, W. T., Cullowhee 
Rawland, Lloyd, Bryson City 
Ruppe, J. L., Rutherfordton, Rt. 1 
Rushing, Glenn, Monroe, Rt. 2 
Russell, C. C, Clinchfield 
Russell, D. D., Clyde, Rt. 1 
Sampson, W. J., Lumberton, Rt. 4 



Sawyer, Clint, Bryson City 
Sawyer, J. E., Sanford 
Scott, A. R., Winston-Salem 
Scott, J. D., Mt. Airy 
Sears, H. C, Apex 
Sebastian, G. W., North Wilkes- 
boro 
Secrest, Eugene, Drexel 
Sentell, R. E., Waynesville, Rt. 3 
Sexton, C. A., Murphy 
Shaver, J. M., Granite Falls 
Shepherd, D. L. Smethport 
Shepherd, Grady, Weaverville 
Shepherd, G. M., Bale 
Shepherd, N. H., Greensboro, 802 

Pearson St. 
Shew, Tom, Lenoir 
Shoclette, D. M., Durham 
Shufford, M. A., Hamrick 
Shufford, S. W., Hamrick 
Simmons, F. L., Old Fort 
Simpson, J. S., Monroe, Rt. 2 
Sisk, C. T., Asheville 
Sisk, Frank, Nebo, Rt. 1 
Sitton, F. J., Bryson City 
Slaydon, George, Draper 
Smart, Chessie, Connelly Springs 
Smith, Burl, Jefferson 
Smith, Charles C, Durham 
Smith, C. L., Central Falls 
Smith, J. Daniel, Mt. Holly 
Smith, Daniel S., Canton, Rt. 1 
Smith, Graham, Cricket 
Smith, Lee, Hazelwood 
Smith, Martin, Cherokee 
Smith, L. C, Winston-Salem 
Smith, R. A., Norwood, Rt. 1 
Smith, Robert, Cherokee 
Smith, Sibbald, Whittier 
Smith, W. E., Rutherfordton 
Snow, J. B., Harmony 
Snuggs, E. A., Durham 
Snyder, George C, Sylva 
Snypes, M. V., Nebo 
Solesbee, Charles, Topton 
Solomon, F. D., Cameron, Rt. 1 
Soots, L. P., Goldston 
Sparks, A. F., Toecane, Rt. 1 
Sparks, J. Y., Toecane, Rt. 1 
Spilman, B. W., Kinston 
Spira, R. H., Washington, D. C. 
Sprinkle, Mike, Marshall, Rt. 2 
Spurling, Edward, Granite Falls 
Staley, A. A., Reddies River 
Stallings, H. W., Albemarle 
Stamey, Sanford, Lawndale 
Stancil, W. D., Kenly, Rt. 2 
Stanley, Frank, Ash 
Stanly, D. M., Pilot Mountain 



of North Carolina 



315 



Stepp, C. N., Canton 
Stanton, J. S., Charlotte 
Stevens, S. G., Buies Creek 
Stephens, A. L., Black Mountain 
Stewart, Gurley, Robbinsville 
Stinson, E. A., Boonville 
Stoney, C. L., Asheville 
Stone, A. W., Durham 
Street, John L., Nebo 
Strickland, L. P., Luck 
Strickland, J. H., Charlotte 
Strickland, M. W., Tabor City 
Sullivan, J. A., Wilmington 
Styers, J. C, Lewisville 
Sudderth, L. W., Montezuma 
Suther, M. E., Wilmington 
Swain, D. C, Jonesville 
Swann, George, Buies Creek 
Swann, S. G., Statesville, Rt. 1 
Swanson, Luther, Culberson 
Swayngin, Ed, Waynesville 
Tally, Robert, Copperhill, Tenn. 
Tanner, M. T., Wake Forest 
Tate, L. R., Statesville 
Taylor, C. T., Waynesville, Rt. 1 
Taylor, E. C, Red Springs 
Teague, J. L., Hickory, Rt. 2 
Teague, Sherill, Cove Creek 
Teeter, E. D., Stanfield 
Tedder, D. A., Shelby 
Testerman, Luther, Amy 
Thomas, J. C, Micaville 
Thomas, Lester, Kings Mountain 
Thomas, W. R., Clinchfield 
Thomas, W. R., Winston-Salem 
Thomason, J. A., Hamptonville 
Thompson, E. C, Matthews 
Thompson, T. R., Hendersonville 
Thompson, T. M., Whiteville 
Thompson, N. A., Ill, Winston- 
Salem 
Thornburg, Edward, Mt. Airy 
Thorne, J. L., Rutherfordton 
Toney, M. S., Mooresboro 
Tomblin, C. C, Spindale 
Totherow, Glenn, Marble 
Totherow, S. A., Andrews 
Towery, E. L., Lawndale 
Treadway, Eli, Smokemont 
Treadway, Walter, Wadesboro 
Tribble, T. J., Burlington 
Tripp, R. E., Kannapolis 
Trivett, D. C, Zionville 
Trull, Crawford, Robbinsville 
Tucker, Oscar, Lincolnton 
Turner, L. B., Kings Mountain 
Turner, L. S., Concord 
Turner, Wiley, Hamptonville 
Turpen, G. L., Yellow Creek 
Underwood, A. G., Monroe, Rt. 6 



Underwood, J. L., Asheville, 

80 Allen St. 
Vance, Harry, Franklin 
Vannoy, F., Gaither, Toliver 
Vannoy, J. F., Meadow View, Va. 
Wacaster, Lee, Cherryville 
Waddell, Lee, Grassy Creek 
Wagner, W. J., Winston-Salem 
Waldrop, H. E., Shelby, 409 N. 

Washington 
Waldrop, J. J., Vale, Rt. 2 
Walker, E. W., Jonesville 
Walker, Oscar, Hickory 
Wall, J. O., Gerton 
Wallace, Jesse, Lumberton 
Wallin, J. C, Marshall, Rt. 3 
Walsh, Grover C, Valdese 
Walsh, T. J., Parsonville 
Walters, J. D., Charlotte 
Watkins, Charles, Bryson City 
Watson, G. M., Boone 
Weaver, J., Marshall, Winston- 
Salem 
Weeks, H. L., Chapel Hill 
Weeks, J. J., Whiteville 
Welborn, Seldon, Mt. Airy 
Welborn, C. S., North Wilkesboro 
Welch, John, Belmont 
Welch, William, Cherokee 
Welch, Bird, Whittier 
Wentz, M. A., China Grove 
West, E., Paul, Raleigh 
West, Dauphus, Brevard 
West, Guy, Leicester 
Weston, W. A., Garner 
Wheeler, Fred, Celo 
White, J. P., Maggie 
White, Wade Z., Mars Hill 
Whitley, Julius W., Albemarle 
Wilde, Patterson, Marshall, Rt. 3 
Wilcoxin. J. H., Summit 
Wilkie, Woodrow W., Fletcher 
Williams, Alex, Yellow Creek 
Williams, C. A., Warrenton 
Williams, Gardner, Yellow Creek 
Williams, George, Cerro Gordo 
Williams, R. I., Trinity, Rt. 1 
Williams, O. B., Spindale 
Williams, J. J., Jackson Springs 
Williams, W. A., Brevard 
Williams, W. W., Oteen 
Willis, B. J., Wilmington 
Willis, John, Bee Log 
Willis, John Ralph, Canton 
Willis, Garland, Bryson City 
Willis, R. T., Jr., Morehead City 
Wilson, Grady, Charlotte 
Wilson, George, Murphy 
Wilson, Hubert, Candler, Rt. 1 
Wilson, J. H., Bryson City 



316 Baptist State Convention 

Wilson, Garrison, Marion Worley, Anglas, Canton, Rt. 1 

Winkler, Oscar, Andrews Worley, Garlin, Mayesville 
Wise, Walten B., Asheville, Rt. 4 Wyatt, Banner, North Wilkesboro 

Womack, R. M., Marion Wright, W. J., Asheville 

Woodruff, W. E., Mt. Airy Wright, Bryce, Asheville 

Woodruff, C. E., Globe Wright, J. G., Mountain Park 

Woodie, Hosea, Lewner, Ga. Yale, J. W., North Wilkesboro 

Woods, L. R., Lenoir, Rt. 7 Yarborough, H. N., Winston- 
Woody, Charlie, Spruce Pine Salem 

Woody, E. S., Spruce Pine Younce, G. H., Andrews 

Wooten, E. K., Yadkinville Young, G. P., Hickory 

Woodard, G. H., Gay Young, W. S., Burlington 



NORTH CAROL! 

BAPTIST 

ANNUAL 





ONE-HUNDRED 
EIGHTEENTH YEAR 



FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
CHARLOTTE 



1948 



Annual 

of the 

Baptist State Convention 

of 

North Carolina 

One Hundred Eighteenth Annual Session 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

Charlotte 
November, 1948 



Edited by 
Charles B. Deane 

Recording Secretary 
Rockingham, N. C. 



The Next Session will be held 



November 15-17, 1949 
Tabernacle Baptist Church, Raleigh 




WILLIAM DOWD POE 

To Whom This Volume of the Annual is Dedicated 

Jointly with Leonard Rowland Pruette 

by Order of the Convention 

Born near Pittsboro. Chatham County North Carolina, April 20, 1880. A 
graduate of Campbell College, Wake Forest College and the Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. During 1911 he served as City Missionary in Raleigh, 
North Carolina. In 1912 he became pastor of the South Hill, Virginia, Baptist 
Church, along with three rural churches, which field he served for fifteen years. 
In 1926 he became pastor of a group of rural Baptist churches in Granville 
County, some of which he served until his sudden death in November 1948. 

He was married to Douglas Thornton of Blackstone, Virginia, who together 
with two daughters, Mrs. Henry Ward, Lumberton, and Mrs. Nelson Thomas, 
of Oxford, and one son William Edward Poe, a student of the Harvard Law 
School, survive. 

Throughout his ministry, he worked most unselfishly to promote and magnify 
the rural Baptist Church life of North Carolina. As a Vice President of the 
Convention, Trustee of Wake Forest and Meredith College. Member of the 
General Board and its Executive Committee, he served with great fidelity. 

Indeed "He was great in heart and wisdom." 




LEONARD ROWLAND PRUETTE 



To Whom This Volume of the Annual is Dedicated 

Jointly with William Dowd Poe 

by Order of the Convention 

Born at Boiling Springs, North Carolina, October 2, 1859; Graduated Wake 
Forest College with A.B. Degree and ordained to ministry in 1887. The first 
two years of his ministry were with the Harrellsville, Bethlehem and Buck- 
horn BanMst churches in Hertford County. Frcm 1889 to 1894 he served as 
pastor First Baptist Church, Mount Airy. Coming to Charlotte in 1894, he 
was pastor of Olivet Church. In 1896 he organized and became pastor of the 
Ninth Avenue Baptist Church, where he served for 30 years. In 1926 he retired 
from the active ministry but for twenty-one years thereafter he was active 
in the work of the ministry as supply pastor, adviser and promoter of many 
Christian achievements. 

In 1888 he married Dora Dunn Shaw. Their children being Rowland Shaw, 
Mrs. John D Carroll and Mrs. Harry P. Carter. 

At times he served as Vice President of the Convention, Trustee of Wake 
Forest and Wingate Junior College, Member General Board and many times 
Moderator of the Mecklenburg-Cabarrus Association. 

His death on December 6, 1947, closed a remarkably successful Ministry of 
sixty years. 



CONTENTS 

SECTION PAGE 

Auditor's Report and Financial Statements, Institutions 165 

Baptist Book Store, executives of 5 

Baptist Foundation, directors of 6 

Baptist Hospital, trustees of , 6 

Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina, trustees of 7 

Baptist Training Union, executives of 5 

Baptist World Alliance, executives of 12 

Biblical Recorder, directors of 7 

Calendar of Denominational Activities S. B. C, 1949 10 

Campbell College, trustees of 8 

Charity and Children, directory of •-... 7 

Chowan College, trustees of 8 

Council on Christian Education, members of 10 

Committees: 

Allied Church League (17) 33 

Committee on Committees (5) 25 

Displaced Persons (96) 69 

Enrollment (4) 25 

Evangelism (17) 34 

General Board, to report on report of (17) 31 

Historical Commission (17) 33 

Memorials (17) 33 

Music (17) 33 

Order of Business (1949) (17) 32 

Place and Preacher (17) 31 

Publicity (17) 32 

Radio, advisory (17) 33 

Resolutions (17) 32 

Social Service and Civic Righteousness (17) 32 

Student Center, Chapel Hill (17) 33 

Trustees and Members General Board, to nominate (17) 32 

Constitution 13-22 

Convention: 

Dedication of Annual to William Dowd Poe and Leonard Rowland 

Pruette _ (103) 71 

Directory 5 

Associational 272 

Historical Table 274 

Income (109) 91 

Institutions 6-10 

Officers, executive and administrative 5 

Officers elected: 

General Secretary (64) 57 

President :.(61) 57 

Vice-Presidents (62) 57 

Recording Secretary (63) 57 

Statistical Secretary (65) 57 

Trustees (66) 58 

Proceedings of (1) 25 

Sermon — E. V. Hudson, Cramerton (20) 36 

General Board: 

By-Laws 14 

Officers and organizations , 6 

Report 87 

Greetings (10) (11) 30 

Kennedy Home, Superintendent of 7 

Mars Hill College, trustees of 9 

Meredith College, trustees of 9 

Messengers 74 

Ministers: 

Charlotte area Ministers recognized (7) , 29 

New ministers recognized (8) 30 

Ordained, active in pastorate 291 

Ordained, not active in pastorate 312 

Ministerial Students in colleges and seminaries 281 

Missionaries, North Carolina, on foreign field 280 

Motions and /or Resolutions: 

Re: Displaced Persons (75) 59 

Re: Pari-mutual Horse Race Gambling (22) (40) 36-52 

Re: Trustees of Boards and Institutions (41) 53 

Re: Labor Management Relations (77) 59 

Re: World Relief (82) (97) 61-70 

"Our Home Goers" 72 

Pastors' Conference: 

Officers 1948 73 

Program 1949 73 



SECTION PAGE 

Reports: 

Associational Missions (48) 53-100 

Baptist Book Store (148) 162 

Baptist Brotherhood Meeting (129) 117 

Baptist Colleges: 

General Statistics 153, 154 

Baptist Foundation (95) (145) 68,155 

Baptist Hospital (68) (88) (147)58,62,159 

Audit Summary 172 

Baptist Training Union (47) (132) 53, 123 

Biblical Recorder (24) 36 

Amendment Charter (25) (39) 40,52 

Campbell College (57) (137) 55, 143 

Chapel Hill Property (74) 58 

Chowan College (57) (138) 55, 144 

Committee on Committee (17) 31 

Cooperative Program (116) 97 

Council on Christian Education (55) (56) (134) 54,137 

Enrollment (18) (73) (104) 36,58,71 

Evangelism (33) 49 

Field Secretaries (116) 98 

Foreign Mission (82) 61 

Gardner-Webb College (57) (139) 55, 146 

Standards Attained (56) 54 

General Board: 

Advance Report (16) (108) 31,89 

Committee to report on report of (90) 63 

Recommendations (150) 163 

Historical Commission (144) 155 

Home For Aged (91) 65 

Home Missions (99) 70 

Mars Hill College (57) (140) 55, 146 

Memorial Committee (102) 71 

Meredith College (57) (135) 55, 141 

Music Committee (100) 70 ■ 

North Carolina Baptist Orphanage (98) (148) 70, 161 

Audit Summary 171 

Order of Business 1948 (6) 26 

Place and Preacher (67) 58 

Publicity Committee (93) 67 

Radio Committee (15) (122) 31, 108 

Resolutions Committee (96) 68 

Relief and Annuity (146) 158 

Social Service and Civil Righteousness (29) 40, 102 

State Missions (35) (117) 51 

Student Work (133) 129 

Sunday Schools (46) (130) 53, 117 

Sunday School Board (78) 59 

Trustees and Members General Board to nominate (92) 65 

Trustees of Convention (89) 62 

Wake Forest College (55) (59) (136)54,55,142 

Enlargement Program and Plans (59) (142) 55, 148 

Horace Easom on Convention's Program (59) 55 

Wingate Junior College (55) (141) 147 

Woman's Missionary Union (81) 60 

Committee of 15 For Disposal Wake Forest (60) 56 

Ridgecrest, directory of 10 

Southern Baptist Convention, directory of 11 

Statistical Data: 

Associational 176-267 

Recapitulation 269 

General Church Activities 270 

Statistical Summary 277 

Visitors Recognized (12) 30 

Wake Forest College, trustees of 9 

Woman's Missionary Union: 

Directory 5 



DIRECTORY OF THE CONVENTION 

I. OFFICERS 

F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh President 

Thomas P. Pruitt, Hickory First Vice-President 

Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville Second Vice-President 

W. Perry Crouch, Asheville Third Vice-President 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh.. General Secretary and Treasurer 

Charles B. Deane, Rockingham Recording Secretary 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Statistical Secretary 

R. L. McMillan, Raleigh Trustee 

P. H. Wilson, Raleigh Trustee 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield Trustee 

II. ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Headquarters: 119 Hillsboro Street and Biblical Recorder Building, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh General Secretary and Treasurer 

E. Lowell Spivey, Charlotte Field Secretary 

J. C. Pipes, 33 Carter St., W. P., Asheville Field Secretary 

Earle L. Bradley, Raleigh Field Secretary 

Miss Margie Murchison, Raleigh Office Secretary 

Miss Esther Ivey, Raleigh Bookkeeper 

Miss Lottie Tucker, Raleigh Bookkeeper Ministers' Retirement Fund 

DEPARTMENT OF MISSIONS 

J. C. Canipe, Hendersonville Secretary of Evangelism 

G. W. Bullard, Raleigh Superintendent of Associational Missions 

DIVISION OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh Secretary 

Mrs. Myra Motley, Raleigh Associate 

D. P. Brooks, Lexington Associational Man 

DIVISION OF TRAINING UNION 

Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Martha Jane Mitchell, Raleigh Junior Leader 

L. J. Newton, Jr., Raleigh Young People's Leader 

Miss Ruth Miller, Raleigh Intermediate Leader 

DIVISION OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

James W. Ray, Raleigh Secretary 

Miss Carolyn Moseley, Greensboro Campus Secretary 

Miss Gloria Blanton, Greenville Campus Secretary 

Miss Marjorie Toole, Boone Campus Secretary 

Miss Billie Ruth Currin, Meredith College, Raleigh Campus Secretary 

R. C. Lasater, N. C, State College, Raleigh Campus Secretary 

Klein E. Parks, Duke University, Durham Campus Secretary 

J. C. Herrin, Chapel Hill Campus Secretary 

Eli Galloway, Wake Forest, Wake Forest College Campus Secretary 

Miss Texie Sowers, Campbell College, Buies Creek Campus Secretary 

BAPTIST BOOK STORE 

Miss Mary Ayscue, Raleigh Manager 

Miss Evelyn Hampton, Charlotte Manager 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION, AUXILIARY TO 
BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION 

Miss Ruth Provence, Raleigh Executive Secretary 

Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh President 

Mrs. W. I. Powell, Raleigh Treasurer 

Miss Hilda Mayo, Raleigh Young People's Leader 

W. B. Jackson, Raleigh Royal Ambassador Secretary 



6 Baptist State Convention 

III. THE GENERAL BOARD AND ORGANIZATION 

R. Archie Ellis, President, Salisbury 

Ralph A. Herring, Vice President, Winston-Salem 

L. L. Morgan, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1949: J. Boyce Brooks, Roxboro; E. S. Elliott, Cherryville; 
Chester Morris, Currituck; R. A. Ellis, Salisbury; Mrs. I. A. Ward, Hertford; 
Lonnie D. Munn, Badin; John W. Lambert, Mount Olive; George D. Heaton, 
Charlotte; Mrs. Paul P. Davis, Yadkinville; I. B. Hudson, Andrews; H. H. 
Stembridge, Forest City. 

Term Expiring 1950: W. W. Jones, Kannapolis; V. Ward Barr, Gastonia; T. E. 
Story, Wilkesboro; Howard G. Dawkins, Kinston; Charles A. Maddry, Wil- 
mington; J. D. Williams, Spindale; James R. Thompson, Greensboro; G. Van 
Stephens, Warsaw; Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; W. Perry Crouch, Ashe- 
ville; H. Fletcher Lambert, Leaksville; W. B. Carr, Mooresville. 

Term Expiring 1951: Elbert F. Hardin, Morganton; Charles P. Burchette, Jr., 
Bla'denboro; Isaac Terrell, Oxford; M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion; John A. Bivens, 
Wingate; J. Alton Morris, Murphy; Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro; F. Orion 
Mixon, Raleigh; Avery M. Church, Winston-Salem; Chas. F. Leek, Thomasville; 
Yates Arledge, Raleigh; R. C. Foster, Whiteville. 

Term Expiring 1952: Carlton S. Prickett, Burlington; Everett White, Franklin; 
Hubert M. Craig, Lincolnton; Mrs. E. B. Beasley, Fountain; W. C. Lucas, Ashe- 
boro; E. W. Holmes, Farmville; John H. Knight, Durham; W. C. Downing, 
Fayetteville; W. M. Morgan, Angier; W. G. Bond, Boone; L. Grady Burgess, 
Jacksonville; Worth C. Grant, Weldon. 

Executive Commmittee: F. Orion Mixon, Chairman; Howard G. Dawkins, Vice 
Chairman: John W. Lambert, Secretary; J. Boyce Brooks, Ralph A. Herring, 
W. Isaac Terrell, W. M. Morgan, Carlton Prickett. 

Committee on Missions: J. D. Williams, Chairman; John W. Lambert, Secre- 
tary; E. S. Elliott, Lonnie D. Munn, W. Isaac Terrell, James R. Thompson, W. W. 
Jones, A. M. Church, H. F. Lambert, R. C. Foster, John H. Knight, H. H. Stem- 
bridge, L. Grady Burgiss, W. G. Bond, Mrs. E. B. Beasley. 

Committee on Benevolence: Chas. F. Leek, Chairman; G. Van Stephens, Sec- 
retary; Mrs. I. A. Ward, Chester Morris, F. Orion Mixon, T. E. Storv, W. B. Carr, 
Chas. P. Burchette, Jr., J. Alton Morris. Elbert F. Hardin, Worth Grant, W. M. 
Morgan, E. W. Holmes, Hubert Craig, W. C. Downing, Everett White. 

Committee on Education: W. Perry Crouch, Chairman; J. Boyce Brooks, 
Secretary; M. O. Owens, Jr.. R. A. Ellis, George D. Heaton, Mrs. Paul P. Davis, 
Charles A. Maddry, Ralph A. Herring, V. Ward Barr, I. B. Hudson, Howard G. 
Dawkins. Harry B. Caldwell, Yates Arledge, John A. Bivens, Carlton S. 
Prickett, W. C. Lucas. 

IV. THE INSTITUTIONS OF THE CONVENTION 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention, November 12, 1919 

Organized December 15, 1919 

First meeting of Directors, November 17, 1920 

R. D. Beam, Secretary, Raleigh 

Term Expiring 1949: J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; W. L. Bennett, Wadesboro; 
E. M. Johnson, Lumberton. 

Term Expiring 1950: R. D. Beam, Raleigh; John F. Danielson, Raleigh; E. R. 
Tilly, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1951: N. A. Dunn, Raleigh; M. K. Rand, Durham; J. C. Joyner, 
Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1952: T. S. Johnson, Raleigh; C. E. Hamilton, Winston-Salem; 
W. C. Bandy, Lincolnton. 

Term Expiring 1953: Swade Barbour, Clayton; F. L. Paschal, Greensboro; 
Robert Holleman, Durham. 

BAPTIST HOSPITAL 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention of N. C, November 17, 1920 
♦ Chartered December 27, 1922 

Begin Operations, May 28, 1923 
Reid T. Holmes, Administrator, Winston-Salem 

Board of Trustees 
William J. Conrad, Jr., President, Winston-Salem 
Term Expiring 1949: William J. Conrad, Winston-Salem; Ronald E. Finch, 
Black Mountain; Brantley Booe, Winston-Salem; C. Rush Hamrick, Shelby; 
Norman O. Spikes, Durham; William Harrison Williams, Charlotte. 

Term Expiring 1950: J. E. Broyhill, Lenoir; B. B. Daugherty, Boone; J. B. 
Efird. Charlotte; S. D. Gibson, High Point; Santford Martin, Winston-Salem; 
T. W. Fryer, New Bern. 



of North Carolina 7 

Term Expiring 1951: Homer Andrews, Burlington; J. G. Raby, Tarboro; 
Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; J. Roy Clifford, Lexington; D. R. Perry, Durham; E. B. 
Denny, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1952: E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; W. J. Stephenson, Wilmington; 
John R. Knott, Charlotte; H. C. Warrick, Greensboro; Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkes- 
boro; Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh. 

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

General Managership began January 12, 1885 

Zeno Wall, General Superintendent, Thomasville 

J. D. Fraley, Treasurer, Thomasville 

MILLS HOME 

Miss Sarah E. Elmore, Superintendent, Thomasville 

KENNEDY HOME 

Transfer of property, April 26, 1912 
First group admitted, June 5, 1914 
W. C. Reed, Superintendent, Kinston 

CHARITY AND CHILDREN 

John Arch McMillan, Editor, Thomasville 

James H. Honeycutt, Plant Superintendent, Thomasville 

Published every Thursday by the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina 

Orphanage Journal of the Baptists of North Carolina 

Founded in 1887 by John H. Mills 

Former Editors 

John H. Mills, July 14, 1887 to July 27, 1888; J. W. Oliver, August 3, 1888 to 

August 24, 1888; John H. Mills. August 31, 1888 to August 30, 1895; Vacant, 

September 6, 1895 to October 4, 1895; Archibald Johnson, October 

11, 1895 to January 10, 1935; John Arch McMillan Associate 

Editor, October 31, 1929 to January 10, 1935. Acting 

Editor January 17, 1935 to May 9, 1935; 

Editor May 16, 1935 — 
Circulation, 36,000 — Price, $1.00 per year 

Board of Trustees 
I. G. Greer, Chairman, Chapel Hill 

Term Expiring 1949: Howard Penton, Wilmington; Waldo Cheek, Asheboro; 
C. M. Abernathy, Lenoir; H. Cloyd Philpot, Jr., Lexington; S. F. Teague, Raleigh. 

Term Expiring 1950: W. A. Bulluck, Rocky Mount; Jesse A. Jones, Kinston; 
R. B. Culler, High Point; E. E. Wheeler, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1951: Miss Addie Mae Cook, Murphy; Mrs. Bess D. Scott, Char- 
lotte; Mrs. L. C. Holloway, Elkin; Edwin Lanier, Chapel Hill; John M. Elliott, 
Edenton. 

Term Expiring 1952: I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill; J. B. Willis, Hamlet; W. E. 
Stanley, Durham; J. E. Conrad, Winston-Salem. 

BIBLICAL RECORDER 

L. L. Carpenter, Editor, Raleigh 

Published every Wednesday in Raleigh, as the Journal of the Baptist State 

Convention of North Carolina 

Founded in 1833 by Thomas Meredith in Edenton. Moved to New Bern in 1835, 

then to Raleigh in 1838. Publication suspended in 1841, but resumed in 1843. 

Originally incorporated 1901 and owned by the Biblical Recorder 

Publishing Company until purchased by The Baptist State 

Convention of North Carolina in 1938 

On January 4, 1939 the first issue was published by the Convention. 

Former Editors 

Thomas Meredith, 1833-51; T. W. Tobey, 1851-53; J. J. James, 1854-61; J. D. 

Hufham, 1861-67; J. H. Mills, 1867-73; A. F. Redd and J. D. Hufham, 1873-74; 

C. T. Bailey. 1875-95; Josiah W. Bailey, 1895-1907; C. W. Blanchard, 

1907; Hight C. Moore, 1907-17; Livingston Johnson, 1917-31; J. S. 

Farmer, 1931-38; George W. Paschal, Contributing Editor, 

1938-39; and Acting Editor, 1939; John Calvin Slemp, 

1939-41; Eugene I. Olive, 1941-42; L. L. 

Carpenter, 1942. 
Circulation, 41,261 — Price, $2.00 a year 

Board of Directors 
Wilson Woodcock, Chairman, Greensboro 
Term Expiring 1949: E. N. Gardner, Henderson; Lowell F. Sodeman, Clinton; 
Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro; W- W. Finlator, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1950: I. B. Jackson, Rutherfordton; S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn; 
Yancey C. Elliott, Sanford; Tom Freeman, Burlington. 



8 Baptist State Convention 

Term Expiring 1951: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest; J. M. Hayes, Winston-Salem; 
L. L. Hatfield. Hickory; T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia. 

Term Expiring 1952: Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville; T. W. Brewer, Raleigh; 
T. S. Lawrence, Cliffside; Charles B. McConnell, Cullowhee. 

V. TRUSTEES OF COLLEGES 

CAMPBELL COLLEGE 

Opened as Buie's Creek Academy, January 5, 1887 

Became Buie's Creek Junior College, August 31, 1926 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell College 

December 17, 1926 

New Charter Campbell College Adopted by Trustees April 7, 1927 

Leslie H. Campbell, President, Buie's Creek 

Board of Trustees 
Dan E. Stewart, Chairman, Raleigh 
Term Expiring 1949: W. E. Nichols, Coats; LeRoy Townsend, Lumberton; J. 
Winston Pearce, Durham; Dan E. Stewart, Raleigh; W. M. Page, Fuquay Springs. 
Term Expiring 1950: W. L. McLoud, Norwood; W. D. Barbee, Seaboard; Blanton 
Hartness, Sanford; Herbert B. Taylor, Dunn; Elmer L. Hedgepeth, Fairmont. 

Term Expiring 1951: John T. Coley, Rocky Mount; J. H. Highsmith, Raleigh; 
B. F. McLeod, Buie's Creek; Harry Carter, Greensboro; Percy H. Wilson, Raleigh. 
Term Expiring 1952: LeRoy Martin, Raleigh; Spurgeon Boyce, Durham; R. W 
Boling, Fayetteville; Willis E. Kivett, Southern Pines; Charlie Andrews, Chalyb- 
eate Springs. 

CHOWAN COLLEGE* 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female Institute 

October 11, 1848 

First called Chowan Female College Institute in 1851 

First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868 

Became Chowan College, May 17, 1910 

Changed to a Junior College, September 1937 

Board of Trustees 
W. R. Parker, Chairman, Woodland 

Term Expiring 1949: W. D. Boone, Winton; E. W. Parker, Murfreesboro; E. R. 
Stewart, Windsor; L. M. Futrell, Murfreesboro; W. R. Parker, Woodland; W. T. 
Love, Elizabeth City. 

Term Expiring 1950: Charlie Brinkley, Colerain; Hugh Lee, Ahoskie; C. L. 
Revelle, Murfreesboro; Bob F. Hill, Murfreesboro; Grady Davis, Conway; Mrs. 
Grady Bridges, Jackson. 

Term Expiring 1951: C. W. Duling, Hertford; R. N. Carroll, Edenton; G. M. 
Singletary, Elizabeth City; G. B. Story, Murfreesboro; Mrs. T. J. Benthall, Mur- 
freesboro; H. O. Raynor, Powellsville. 

Term Expiring 1952: Lonnie Sasser, Murfreesboro; W. D. Morris, Scotland 
Neck; Jarvis Teague, Seaboard; Raynor Woodard, Conway; Marion Revelle, 
Conway; E. B. Lassiter, Potecasi; W. H. Evans, Harrellsville. 

'Suspended operations and not operated since 1943. 

GARDNER-WEBB COLLEGE 

Chartered first as Boiling Springs High School, Incorporated, December 2, 1905 

Opened as Boiling Springs Junior College, September 3, 1928 

The name was changed and a new charter granted to Gardner-Webb 

Junior College, Incorporated, June 1942 

Charter amended in conformity to the Constitution of the North Carolina 

Baptist State Convention, November 1946 

Amitted to the North Carolina Baptist State Convention at the Convention 

held in Asheville, November 21, 1946 

Phil L. Elliott, President, Boiling Springs 

Board of Trustees 
J. R. Dover, President, Shelby 

Term Expiring 1949: Earle Hamrick, Shelby; Selma Webb, Shelby; Wyan W. 
Washburn, Boiling Springs; W. E. Pettit, Forest City; W. B. Hair, Gastonia; 
A. W. McMurray, Shelby; Aaron B. Quinn, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1950: Walter Hicks, Mooresboro; Mrs. O. Max Gardner, Sr., 
Shelby; Margaret Young, Forest City; J. R. Dover, Shelby; J. E. Owens, Hickory; 
Guy Carswell, Charlotte; G. H. Roberts, Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1951: Claude Henson, Belmont; J. G. Vann, Raleigh; Horace 
Hammett, Durham; Ed Harrell, Newton; S. L. Lamm, Bryson City; Fred Caldwell, 
Maiden; James Potter, Statesville. 

Term Expiring 1952: Mrs. Rush Stroup, Shelby; J. Herbert Bridges, Char- 
lotte; R. S. Dickson, Charlotte; W. W. Harris, Shelby; C. D. Forney, Lawndale. 



or North Carolina 9 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First Commencement or Exhibition as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1857 

Chartered Mars Hill College, February 16, 1859 

Opened as Mars Hill Junior College, August 14, 1922 

Hoyt Blackwell, President, Mars Hill 

Board of Trustees 
Grover H. Jones, President, High Point 

Term Expiring 1949: Oscar R. Mangum, Lenoir; Grover H. Jones, High Point; 
Burette Myers, Statesville; Bruce Sams, Mars Hill; F. W. Jarvis, Spindale; L. M. 
Caldwell, Newton; J. R. Morgan, Waynesville. 

Term Expiring 1950: John A. Bailey, Burlington; J. T. Joyner, Jr., Winston- 
Salem; Charles E. Parker, Franklin; E. C. McCall, Lenoir; W. Locke, Robinson, 
Mars Hill; T. N. Stanback, Salisbury. 

Term Expiring 1951: R. O. Huffman, Morganton; Mrs. C. M. Palmer, Albe- 
marle; A. W. Whitehurst, Marshall; J. E. Gibson, High Point; C. G. Mumford, 
Raleigh; Mrs. George Pennell, Asheville. 

Term Expiring 1952: Clyde Jarrett, Andrews; Grady B. Yelton, Rutherford- 
ton; Myron Gordon, Marion; W. F. Woodall, Lenoir; C. C. Holland, Statesville; 
J. B. Ellen, Greensboro. 

MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of North Carolina, February 27, 1891 

Opened for Students, September 27, 1899 

By Legislative enactment became Baptist University for Women, January 20, 1905 

Became Meredith College by Legislative enactment January 24, 1911 

Carlyle Campbell, President, Raleigh 

Board of Trustees 
H. Pat Taylor, President, Wadesboro 

Term Expiring 1949: Edwin W. Yates, Raleigh; Mrs. Walter Clark, Asheville; 
Carroll Abbott, Elizabeth City; Robert G. Deyton, Raleigh; W. R. Chambers, 
Marion; W. H. Plemmons, Chapel Hill. 

Term Expiring 1950: Mrs. H. M. Baker, Lumberton; Mrs. F. D. Lethco, Char- 
lotte; Robert L. Humber, Greenville; Broadus E. Jones, Raleigh; L. E. Spikes 
Burlington; O. Max Gardner, Jr., Shelby. 

Term Expiring 1951: Rufus Hunter, Raleigh; J. M. Kesler, Winston-Salem; 
Mrs. Cooper E. Taylor, Charlotte; T. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Howard J. Ford, Elkin; 
H. Pat Taylor, Wadesboro; Mrs. J. Winston Pearce, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1952: Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton; J. B. Turner, Laurinburg; 
W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh; Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn, Raleigh; H. M. Rowland, 
Wilmington; Claude U. Broach, Charlotte. 

WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute, February 3, 1834 

Chartered as Wake Forest College, December 28, 1838 

Bowman Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College 

Officially opened July 1, 1941 

The first class of students began work September 10, 1941 

Thitrman D. Kitchin, President, Wake Forest 

Board of Trustees 

Irving Carlyle, President, Winston-Salem 

Term Expiring 1949: Irving Carlyle, Winston-Salem; G. B. Barefoot, Wilming- 
ton; O. M. Mull, Shelby; Nane Starnes, Asheville, C. W. Weathers, Raleigh; Erick 
Bell, Wilson; C. C. Warren, Charlotte; C. C. Wall, Lexington; Ronald E. Wall, 
Elizabeth City; D. H. Bridger. Bladenboro. 

Term Expiring 1950: C. B. Deane, Rockingham; Horace Easom, Shelby; Carey 
Herring, Fairmont; W. Reid Martin, Raleigh; J. A. McLeod, Dunn; S. A. Burts, 
Gastonia; C. N. Peeler, Charlotte; R. K. Redwine, Mt. Airy; J. Clyde Turner, 
Greensboro. 

Term Expiring 1951: L. R. Varser, Lumberton; J. M. Broughton, Raleigh; 
E. C Shoe, Taylorsville; J. J. Tarlton, Rutherfordton; Charles H. Jenkins, 
Aulander; John H. Vernon, Burlington; Peyton Ivey, Murphy; M. L. Banister, 
Oxford; 0. J. Sikes, Albemarle. 

Term Expiring 1952: C. E. Baucom, Wilson; B. E. Morris, Durham; R. K. 
Benfield, Hickory; Claude B. Bowen, Greensboro; E. L. Davis, Winston-Salem; 
Carl V. Tyner, Leaksville; A. B. Wood, Charlotte; Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro; 
Hubert E. Olive, Lexington; H. L. Bridges, Raleigh. 



10 Baptist State Convention 



VI. COUNCIL ON CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

Authorized by Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, 1944 

Claude F. Gaddy, Executive Secretary, Raleigh 

W. Perry Crouch, Chairman, Asheville 

Term Expiring 1949: L. M. Massey, Zebulon; J. Glenn Blackburn, Wake Forest. 
Term Expiring 1950: Mrs. Gordon Maddrey, Ahoskie; M. D. Teague, Greens- 
boro. 

Term Expiring 1951: Winfield Blackwell, Winston-Salem; Lloyd Griffin, Raleigh. 
Term Expiring 1952: William A. Poole, Burgaw; C. Sylvester Green, Durham. 

VII. OFFICERS BAPTIST PASTOR'S CONFERENCE 

Officers for 1949 

John H. Knight, President, Route 6, Durham 

Thomas S. Lawrence, Vice President, Cliffside 

W. Isaac Terrell, Secretary, Oxford 

VIII. NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST BROTHERHOOD 

Don C. Young, President, Asheville 
M. O. Thornburg, First Vice-President, Gastonia 

C. B. Reavis, Second Vice-President, Harmony 
Fuller Parham, Third Vice-President, Henderson 

O. Max Gardner, Secretary, Shelby 

John D. Holmes, Chorister, Raleigh 

IX. RIDGECREST 

Chartered March 1907 

Southern Baptist Convention Summer Assembly Grounds 

Ridgecrest, North Carolina 

Owned and Operated by 

The Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 

T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tennessee 

Robert Guy, Manager, Ridgecrest 

X. DENOMINATIONAL CALENDAR 

THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION CALENDAR 

CO-ORDINATED DENOMINATIONAL ACTIVITIES FOR 1949 

First Quarter 
January — 

(1) Cooperative Program Emphasis 

(2) Church Schools of Missions 

(3) The Theological Seminaries 

(4) W.M.U. Training School 

(5) Student Life-Commitment Day, January 16 
February — 

(1) Baptist World Alliance Sunday and Offering, February 6* 

(2) G. A. Focus Week, February 6-12 

(3) Stewardship Sunday, February 13 

(4) Student Evangelistic Week, February 13-19 
March — 

(1) Home Missions 

(2) W.M.U. Week of Prayer for Home Missions and Annie Armstrong 

Offering, February 28-March 4* 

(3) Home and Foreign Missions Day in Sunday School and Offering, 

March 27 s 

Second Quarter 

April — 

(1) Relief and Annuity Board (and Offering for the Relief of Aged Min- 

isters)* 

(2) Christian Literature and Church Libraries 

(3) Training Union Study Courses 

(4) Training Union Youth Week in the Churches, April 3-10 
May — 

(1) Christian Home Week, May 1-8 

(2) Hospital Day on Mother's Day, May 8 

(3) Sunbeam Focus Week, May 8-14 

(4) W.M.U. Annual Meeting, May 15-17 

(5) Southern Baptist Convention, May 18-22 



of North Carolina 11 



June — 

(1) Christian Education 

(2) Vacation Bible School 

(3) Ridgecrest, State Assemblies, and Camps 

(4) Radio — The Baptist Hour 

Third Quarter 

(1) Ridgecrest, State Assemblies, and Camps 

July— 

(2) Volunteer Summer Service by Students 

(3) Summer Revivals 

August — 

(1) W.M.U. Young People's Organizations 

(2) Ridgecrest, State Assemblies, and Camps 

(3) Summer Revivals 

(4) Y.W.A. Focus Week, August 6-12 

September — 

(1) Southern Baptist and State Foundations 

(2) W.M.U. Season of Prayer for State Missions and Offering (as promoted 

by the state W.M.U.) 

(3) Intermediate Emphasis Week 

(4) Student Join-the Church Day (Sunday following college opening) 

Fourth Quarter 
October — 

(1) Sunday School Training Courses 

(2) State Papers and Missionary Magazines 

(3) Stewardship and Tithing 

(4) Every-Member Canvass 

(5) Layman's Day, October 9 

(6) Enlistment Day in the Churches, October 16 (or nearest convenient 

Sunday) 

(7) State Mission Day in Sunday School and Offering October 23 (as pro- 

moted by the states) 

November — 

(1) Stewardship and Tithing (continued) 

(2) Every-Member Canvass (continued) 

(3) Orphanage Day and Offering (as promoted by the states) 

(4) R. A. Focus Week, November 6-12 

December — 

(1) Foreign Missions 

(2) Every-Member Canvass (completed) 

(3) Southwide Simultaneous Associational Training Union Meetings, Decem- 

ber 5 

(4) W.M.U. Week of Prayer for Foreign Missions and Lottie Moon Christ- 

mas Offering, December 5-9* 

(5) Student Night at Christmas, December 25 

NOTE. — At some time during the year, emphasize the service to all types of 
Southern Baptist work, at home and abroad, which the American Bible Society 
renders by supplying the Scriptures, without profit and often below cost, 
and explain its need for contributions from the churches. 

"These offerings have been approved by the Southern Baptist Convention. 

XL DIRECTORY OF THE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 

The Convention was organized May 8, 1845, and held its first meeting in 
Augusta Ga. 

The 1942 Convention was held in San Antonio, Texas. 

The 1943 and 1945 Conventions were deferred by the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention Executive Committee in view of war restrictions on travel. 

The 1944 Convention was held in Atlanta, Ga. 

The 1946 Convention was held in Miami, Fla. 

The 1947 Convention was held in St. Louis, Mo., May 7-11, 1947. 

The 1948 Convention was held in Memphis, Tenn., May 19-23, 1948. 

The 1949 Convention will be held in Oklahoma City, Okla., May 18-22, 1949. 

Officers of the Convention: 

President: Robert G. Lee, Memphis, Tenn. 

First Vice-President: Porter M. Bailes, Tyler, Texas. 

Second Vice-President: W. Maxey Jarman, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary: Porter Rough, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary: Joe W. Burton, Nashville, Tenn. 

Treasurer: Duke K. McCall, Nashville, Tenn. 



12 Baptist State Convention 

Executive Committee: 

Duke K. McCall, Executive Secretary, Nashville, Tenn. North Carolina 
Members: C. C. Warren, Charlotte; W. Perry Crouch, Asheville. 

Boards of the Convention: 

Foreign Mission Board, Richmond, Va., M. T. Rankin, Executive Secretary. 

North Carolina members: Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; R. K. 

Benfield, Hickory. 
Home Mission Board, Atlanta, Ga., J. B. Lawrence, Executive Secretary- 
Treasurer, North Carolina members: J. B. Turner, Laurinburg; J. Roy 

Clifford, Lexington. 
Sunday School Board, Nashville, Tenn., T. L. Holcomb, Executive Secretary. 

North Carolina members: Zeno Wall, Thomasville; J. S. Hopkins, High 

Point. 
Relief and Annuity Board, Dallas, Texas, Walter R. Alexander, Executive 

Secretary, North Carolina members: F. O. Mixon, Raleigh; L. S. Gaines, 

Fayetteville. 

Institutions of the Convention: 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Ellis A. Fuller, President, Louis- 
ville, Ky. North Carolina members of Board of Trustees: J. Clyde 
Turner, Greensboro; William Harrison Williams, Charlotte; F. Orion 
Mixon, Raleigh. 

Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, E. D. Head, President, Semi- 
nary Hill, Texas. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: 
A. P. Stephens, Lumberton. 

New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, Roland Q. Leavell, President, 
New Orleans, La. North Carolina member of Board of Trustees: 
Wilson W. Woodcock, Greensboro. 

American Baptist Theological Seminary, E. P. Alldredge, Business Manager 
and Financial Secretary. 

Southern Baptist Hospital, Frank Tripp, Superintendent, New Orleans, 
La., North Carolina director: Eugene Olive, Wake Forest. 

Southern Baptist Foundation, Duke K. McCall, Executive Secretary. North 
Carolina member, J. Clyde Turner, Greensboro. 

Commissions of the Convention: 

Education Commission — Chas. D. Johnson, Chairman, Waco, Texas. North 

Carolina Member: C. Sylvester Green, Durham. 
Social Service Commission — J. B. Weatherspoon, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. 

North Carolina member: I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill. 
Radio Commission — S. F. Lowe, Director, Atlanta, Ga. North Carolina 

member, L. J. Morriss, Raleigh. 
Historical Society — W. O. Carver, Chairman, Louisville, Ky. North Carolina 

member, G. W. Paschal, Wake Forest. 

Standing Committees of the Convention: 

Baptist Brotherhood of the South, Lawson H. Cooke, Executive Secretary, 

Memphis, Tenn. North Carolina Member: Don C. Young, Asheville. 
Order of Business next Session, E. H. Westmoreland, chairman, Houston, 

Texas. 
Public Relations, Walter P. Binns, Chairman, Liberty, Mo.; J. M. Brough- 

ton, Raleigh. 
W.M.U. Work, Mrs. George R. Martin, Chairman, Norfolk, Va.; Mrs. Foy J. 

Farmer, Raleigh. 
Committee on Boards, Harold W. Seever, Chairman, Florence, S. C; 

T. S. Lawrence, Cliffside. 

Special Committees of the Convention to Report in 1949: 

(North Carolina Member.) 

Baptist Papers: L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh. 

Calendar of Coordinated Denominational Activities: 

Church Organizations: Claude Gaddy, Raleigh. 

Inter-Convention Committee on Negro Ministerial Education. 

Western Assembly. 

To Discuss "Common Problems" with Northern Baptists. 

To Study Field of Theological Education. 

To Investigate Oregon Petition: C. C. Warren, Charlotte. 

To Study Hospital Policy: Perry Crouch, Asheville. 

To Study By-Law 17. 

Officers of the Woman's Missionary Union: 

Organized May 14, 1888, as auxiliary to the Southern Baptist Convention. 
Headquarters, Birmingham, Ala., Miss Alma Hunt, Executive Secre- 
tary. North Carolina President, Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh. 

XII. BAPTIST WORLD ALLIANCE 

Heaquarters: Washington, D. C. Organized in London, England, July 11-19, 
1905. 

Last Session, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 29-August 3, 1947. 
Next Session, Cleveland, Ohio, July 22-27, 1950. 



CONSTITUTION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the permanent 
guidance and control of its activities, this body does adopt the fol- 
lowing as its Constitution, to wit: 

ARTICLE I. Name 

The name of this bady is the Baptist State Convention of North 
Carolina. 

ARTICLE II. Purposes 

The object of this Convention shall be to promote missions, educa- 
tion, social service, the distribution of the Bible and sound religious 
literature, and to cooperate with the work of the Southern Baptist 
Convention. 

ARTICLE III. Composition 

The Convention shall be composed of (1) two messengers from 
each cooperating church, and one additional messenger from each 
church for every hundred members or major fraction thereof, be- 
yond the first one hundred members; provided, that no church shall 
be entitled to more than ten messengers. No one shall be a mes- 
senger who is not a member of a church cooperating with the Con- 
vention, and messengers must be duly elected by their churches, 
a cooperating church shall be one that supports any object of the 
Convention; and (2) the officers of the Convention, the members 
of the General Board, the editor of the Biblical Recorder, and the 
President of the Woman's Missionary Union. 

ARTICLE IV. Meetings 

The Convention shall convene annually on Tuesday after the 
second Sunday in November. In case of emergency the General 
Board is empowered to change the time or place of meeting, cancel 
the sessions of the Convention, or call a special meeting by a vote 
of two-thirds of the members present when the vote is taken. 

ARTICLE V. Officers 

The officers of the Convention shall be a President, a First Vice 
President a Second Vice President, a Third Vice President, a Record- 
ing Secretary, a Statistical Secretary, a General Secretary, a Treas- 
urer, who at the discretion of the Convention may be the General 
Secretary and three Trustees. The terms of all officers shall com- 
mence at the conclusion of the annual session at which they are 
elected and continue until the close of the next Convention. The 
President or Vice Presidents may not be elected for more than two 
consecutive terms. All officers shall be elected on the second day 



14 Baptist State Convention 

of the annual Convention. A vacancy in any office occurring between 
sessions of the Convention may be filled by the General Board. 

ARTICLE VI. Trustees of the Convention 

The Convention shall have three trustees who shall serve for one 
year and shall hold title to the property of the Convention and con- 
vey and use the same as directed by the Convention or its General 
Board. They shall execute obligations only in behalf of and as 
ordered by the Convention. They shall have the powers granted to 
trustees of religious societies by the laws of the State of North 
Carolina, but subject always to the limitations imposed by this Con- 
stitution and by action of the Convention or its General Board. 
They shall require the Treasurer of the Convention to give suit- 
able bond, with corporate security and in adequate amount as 
determined by the General Board, and they shall cause such bonds 
to be safely kept. Failure on the part of the Treasurer to main- 
tain such a bond in force for as long a period as ten days shall 
authorize the Trustees to remove him from office and fill the vacancy 
at once. The Trustees shall make full, detailed reports to the 
annual sessions of the Convention and at other times if requested 
by the General Board. They shall safely keep the seal of the Con- 
vention and affix it only as authorized by the Convention or its 
General Board. The seal shall be circular in form and shall bear 
the words: 

"Trustees of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, In- 
corporated 1893. 

SEAL." 

The Trustees shall keep full minutes of all their meetings and 
preserve the same in permanent forms. They shall elect their own 
Chairman and Secretary. Any vacancy occuring in their member- 
ship between sessions of the Convention shall be filled by the General 
Board. 

ARTICLE VII. The General Board of the Convention 

The General Board shall consist of the President and the Record- 
ing Secretary of the Convention, ex officio, and forty-eight members 
from the State at large. One-fourth of the members shall be elected 
each year. The members of the Board shall be elected by the Con- 
vention for terms of four years. The retiring members of the 
Board shall be ineligible for reelection until the following meeting 
of the Convention. No one in the employment for pay of any in- 
stitution of the Convention shall be eligible for membership on the 
Board except as an ex officio member. The General Board shall have 
the power of the Convention in the interim between sessions of the 
Convention, and it shall have general supervision of all agencies and 
institutions fostered and supported by the Convention. The Board 
shall have power to fill vacancies in its own membership, occurring 
between sessions of the Convention. 



of North Carolina 15 

ARTICLE VIII. Agencies of the Convention 

Section A. Trustees of the Convention's Institutions. 
The charter of every institution owned or supported in whole 
or in part by the Convention shall contain the following provisions: 

Subsection 1. The Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 
shall elect the trustees and directors of said corporation for terms 
of four years except that the Directors of the Baptist Foundation 
shall be elected for terms of five years. At the first election by 
the Convention one-fourth of the board of trustees shall be elected 
to serve for one year, one-fourth for two years, one-fourth for three 
years, and the remaining one-fourth for four years. At each sub- 
sequent regular annual session of the Convention one-fourth of the 
Board of Trustees of said corporation shall be elected by the 
Convention to succeed the members of said Board retiring, the re- 
tiring members being ineligible for reelection until one year has 
elapsed. 

Any person who has served not longer than one year of any 
unexpired term is eligible to succeed himself. 

Subsec 2. The trustees shall be responsible to the Convention 
for the operation of its institutions in accordance with Baptist prin- 
ciples; full report of all work done and undertaken shall be reported 
to the Convention; no change of policy shall be made without secur- 
ing the prior approval of the Convention or its General Board; 
no program shall be inaugurated which might involve the Conven- 
tion directly or indirectly, in a debt, without securing the prior ap- 
proval of the Convention. 

Subsec 3. The members of the Board of Trustees of said corpora- 
tion shall be residents of the State of North Carolina and members 
of churches cooperating with the Convention. 

Subsec 4. Removal of a member of a Board of Trustees. If for 
any reason a member of a Board shall cease to be a member of a 
church cooperating with the Convention or shall remove his resi- 
dence from the State, his membership on any Board shall be 
thereby terminated. Any vacancy on the Board shall be filled by 
the remaining members until the next regular annual session of the 
Convention, and the Convention shall at its next regular annual 
session fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. The Board of 
Trustees of said corporation by affirmative vote of three-fourths of 
the entire membership given in regular annual meeting or in a 
special meeting called for the purpose, shall have the power to re- 
move from office any trustee of such corporation for cause con- 
sidered sufficient by such Board, but only after reasonable notice 
to such trustee and opportunity to be heard by the Board. The Con- 
vention shall have the right to remove any trustee for cause con- 
sidered sufficient by the Convention, but only after reasonable notice 
to such trustee and opportunity for him to be heard by the Con- 



16 Baptist State Convention 

vention. Notice of such contemplated action and hearing by the 
Convention may be given by the Executive Committee of the 
General Board of the Convention. 

Subsec. 5. The trustees of the institutions and agencies of the 
Convention shall be nominated by the Committee to Nominate 
Trustees of the Convention, its institutions and General Board. The 
trustees of all institutions owned and supported by the Convention 
shall make an annual report to the above committee of all vacancies 
to be filled. 

Sec. B. Council on Christian Education. 

The Council shall be composed of the following : ( 1 ) The members 
of the Education Committee of the General Board; (2) eight mem- 
bers at large, to be elected by the Convention, one-fourth annually; 
(3) the President and the Chairman of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees and the President and Dean of each of 
the educational institutions which may at the time be receiving 
funds from the Convention; (4) the President of the State Con- 
vention, the President of the Woman's Missionary Union, the Pres- 
ident of the General Board, the General Secretary of the Conven- 
tion. The Chairman of the Committee on Education of the General 
Board shall be Chairman of the Council, and the President of the 
Woman's Missionary Union shall be Vice Chairman. 

No member of the Council who occupies a salaried position with 
the Convention or its institutions or its auxiliary shall have a vote 
on appropriations that may be made to the institutions; and all 
appropriations agreed upon shall be subject to the approval of the 
General Board. The duties and powers of the Council shall be 
fixed by the By-Laws of the Convention. 

Sec C. Baptist Foundation. 

This agency of the Convention was authorized and organized in 
1919, and is incorporated under the Laws of the State of North 
Carolina. Its directors are elected for five-year terms, one-fifth of 
the number annually by the Convention. It was organized and is 
maintained for the purpose of receiving and holding and administer- 
ing donations of money and property which charitable-minded per- 
sons may desire to leave to it from time to time. 

ARTICLE IX. Concerning Debts 

Section A. The General Board shall have authority to borrow 
money in anticipation of current revenue, provided that any unpaid 
balance of such borrowing at the end of the current fiscal year shall 
be provided for in and made a part of the budget for the subsequent 
fiscal year. 

Sec. B. No institution or agency of the Convention shall en- 
cumber its property or change its status with respect to the Con- 
vention without authority from the Convention. Institutions and 



of North Carolina 17 

agencies of the Convention, subject to the approval of the General 
Board, shall have authority to borrow money in anticipation of 
current revenue, provided that any unpaid balance of such bor- 
rowing at the end of the current fiscal year shall be provided for 
in and made a part of the budget for the subsequent current year. 

Sec. C. All borrowing by the Convention for its own use, or for 
its institutions or agencies, or borrowings by any institution or 
agency of the Convention, the payment of which would require an 
extension of time beyond the close of the subsequent fiscal year, 
shall be authorized only on the following terms and conditions: 

( 1 ) Notice of any and all contemplated borrowings shall appear 
in the Biblical Recorder in three separate issues in advance of the 
meeting of the Convention during which it is proposed that action 
be taken. 

(2) Any and all resolutions which propose the borrowing of money 
shall set forth all pertinent facts and a definite schedule for repay- 
ment. They shall be considered by the Committee on Resolutions, 
or by a special committee, and shall be voted on by the Convention 
on two separate days while the Convention is in session; and on 
each day they must receive the votes of at least three-fifths of the 
messengers present when the vote is taken, and such vote shall be 
recorded in the minutes of the Convention. 

ARTICLE X. Miscellaneous 

Section A. The Convention's fiscal year shall close on Decem- 
ber 31. 

Sec B. The members of the Boards of the Convention and its 
institutions and agencies shall be distributed as widely as practicable. 
The term of office of a trustee who has not resigned, died, become 
disqualified, or been removed shall not expire until his successor 
shall have been duly elected and qualified. No individual shall 
serve on any Board, or institution, who is at the same time holding 
membership on any other Board or institution. Not more than three 
members of any Board of any institution or agency supported wholly 
or in part by the Convention shall be members of the same church. 

Sec. C. Individuals, churches and associations, or others desiring 
the assistance and cooperation of the Baptists of the Convention 
in any work not already fostered by the Convention shall present 
such project to the agency under which it should be properly placed. 
If the agency fails or refuses to approve it, it may be presented to 
the Convention under miscellaneous business or as a special order. 

Sec. D. Neither the Convention, nor any institution or agency, 
owned or supported in whole or in part by the Convention, shall 
accept or receive, directly or indirectly, any gift, grant, or aid from 
the Federal or State governments or any governmental agency, 



18 Baptist State Convention 

except for definite and full services rendered by the institution or 
agency and by and with the approval of the Convention or its 
General Board. 

ARTICLE XL Woman's Missionary Union 

The Woman's Missionary Union of North Carolina is recognized 
as an auxiliary of this Convention whose accomplishments and poten- 
tialities in good works are appreciated as being of immeasurable 
power to our Christian cause. 

ARTICLE XII. Amendments 

This Constitution may be changed or amended on the second day 
of any annual session of the Convention by a two-thirds vote of the 
registered messengers present when the vote is taken provided, 
that notice of the contemplated change shall have been announced 
on or before the first day of the Convention. 

ARTICLE XIII. Validate 

The adoption of this new Constitution shall not invalidate any 
action validly taken by or in behalf of the Convention or any of its 
institutions or agencies prior to the date this new Constitution be- 
comes effective. 

BY-LAWS 

The work of the Convention shall be governed by the following 
by-laws: 

ARTICLE I. Duties of Officers of the Convention 

Section A. The President shall preside over the deliberations 
of the Convention and discharge such other duties as are imposed 
upon him by the Convention or as are incumbent on the presiding 
officer of a deliberative body. He shall in advance of the meeting 
of the Convention appoint a Committee on Enrollement consisting 
of nine members, and a Committee on Committees consisting of 
fifteen members. He may appoint other committees when so directed 
by the body. In case of his death or incapacity to serve the Vice 
Presidents shall succeed him in the order of their rank. 

Sec. B. The Recording Secretary shall record and preserve 
the proceedings of the Convention and shall have the same printed 
and distributed. 

Sec C. The General Secretary of the Convention shall promote 
the whole program of the Convention, including Missions, Education 
and Social Service, and may serve as adviser to all the institutions, 
agencies and committees of the Convention. He shall work under 
the direction of and be subject to the authority of the General 
Board; and shall have administrative supervision of such work as 
shall be assigned to him by the Convention or its General Board. 



of North Carolina 19 

Sec. D. The Treasurer shall receive all funds sent him for the 
objects of the Convention, make acknowledgment of the same once 
a month in the Biblical Recorder, give bond to the Trustees of the 
Convention in such amount as the General Board may determine 
for the faithful performance of his duties. The Treasurer shall sign 
all checks, which shall be countersigned by the General Secretary, 
or in case the offices of Secretary and Treasurer shall be filled by 
the same person, then all checks shall be signed by the bonded 
bookkeeper, or by any other bonded officer or employee at the 
discretion of the Board, which shall indicate its decision and will 
by filing formal resolutions with the depository bank; and such 
checks shall be countersigned by the General Secretary. 

He shall forward at least once a month all contributions to their 
destinations. He shall make an annual report of his receipts and 
disbursements which shall be published in the minutes of the 
Convention, and upon retiring from his office, he shall deliver to his 
successor all money, papers, books and other property belonging 
thereto. 

ARTICLE II. Duties of Committees 

The committees of the Convention shall be divided into three 
categories : 

Section A. Those appointed by the President in advance of the 
Convention : 

Subsection 1. A Committee on Enrollment consisting of nine 
members whose duties it shall be to provide registration cards for 
messengers and visitors and have them in a suitable place several 
hours before the meeting of the Convention. This committee shall 
make a report to the assembled messengers upon the call of the 
President, and shall serve as a committee on credentials. 

Subsec 2. A Committee on Committees whose duty it shall be to 
name the following committees, and such other committees as may 
be assigned to it. 

Sec B. Those named to report at the session of the Convention 
by which they are appointed: 

Subsec. 1. Committee on Resolutions, consisting of thirteen. 

Subsec 2. Committee to report on the General Board's report, 
consisting of twenty-three. 

Subsec 3. Committee on Place and Preacher for the next Con- 
vention, consisting of nine. 

Sec C. Those named to report at a subsequent session of the 
Convention: 

Subsec 1. Committee on Order of Business, consisting of nine. 

Subsec 2. Committee to nominate the members of the General 
Board and trustees and directors of the institutions and agencies of 
the Convention, consisting of fifteen. 



20 Baptist State Convention 

Subsec. 3. Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness, 
consisting of fifteen. 

Subsec. 4. Historical Commission, consisting of thirteen. 
Subsec 5. Committee on Publicity, consisting of five. 
Subsec. 6. Committee on Memorials, consisting of five. 

ARTICLE III. The General Board 

Section A. Its Organization. 

Subsection 1. Meetings. The General Board shall meet in regular 
sessions in January and June of each year, and in cases of emergency, 
at the call of the General Secretary and the President of the Board, 
or of any five members. 

Subsec 2. Officers and Department Heads. At the January meet- 
ing of the Board, there shall be elected the following officers who 
shall serve for one year, and until their successors are elected and 
qualified; a President, a Vice President, and a Recording Secretary. 
At the same time, the Board shall elect all department heads, and 
such other assistants as may from time to time be deemed neces- 
sary, and shall fix the compensation of its secretaries and other 
employees, and all salaried officers of the Convention. 

Subsec 3. Committees at the January meeting of the Board 
an Executive Committee of eight members shall be elected and the 
membership of the Board shall be divided into three committees: 
(1) Committee on Missions; (2) Committee on Education; (3) Com- 
mittee on Beneficences. 

Sec B. Powers and Duties of General Board. 

Subsec 1. Charge of Work. The General Board shall have 
charge and control of all work of the Convention, including Missions, 
Education, Beneficences, and all other general activities, in the 
iterim between sessions of the Convention, except those activities 
committed specifically by charter to the Boards of Trustees of its 
institutions and agencies. It shall have the power to act for the 
Convention in the interim between sessions of the Convention; and 
any action taken during the interim shall be binding on the Con- 
vention and reported fully to the Convention at its next session. 
It shall make and approve all appropriations. It shall have no 
power to contravene any action of the Convention nor to launch 
any new institution. It may provide for the expansion of any phase 
of work which its income and resources may make possible. It 
shall have the responsibility of bringing to the Convention for its 
Consideration recommendations concerning any phase of the work 
that is being done or that should be undertaken in order that the 
Convention may have an over-all picture of the total program of 
North Carolina Missionary Baptists. 

Subsec 2. Reports. The General Board shall make a full report 
to the Convention of its activities during the year, including the 
work done by the departments of Missions, Education, and Benefi- 






of North Carolina 21 

cencies and all other general activities. The Board shall have its 
report printed and ready for distribution at the first session of the 
Convention, including reports from Educational Institutions, Hos- 
pitals, Orphanages, Baptist Foundation, Educational Council, and 
all other agencies of the Convention. 

Subsec. 3. Allocation of Funds. The General Board shall recom- 
mend to the Convention the percentage of undesignated gifts which 
each object of the Convention shall receive, both State and South- 
ern Baptist Convention objects. 

Subsec. 4. Audits. The General Board shall employ a certified 
public accountant each year to make a complete audit of the books 
and accounts of the treasurer and bookkeeping departments and re- 
port to the General Board and shall have it published in the Minutes 
of the Convention. 

ARTICLE IV. Council on Christian Education 

Section A. Powers. 

In the interim between the meetings of the General Board the 
Council shall have oversight of the entire program of education in 
the colleges and schools of the Convention. 

Sec. B. Duties. The duties of the Council shall be as follows: 

( 1 ) It shall devise ways and means for the proper correlation 
of the work and programs in the several educational institutions , 
supported by the Convention. 

(2) It shall study the needs of the institutions and their ability 
to meet these needs, and upon the basis of its findings shall recom- 
mend to the General Board allocations to the institutions of such 
funds as may be made available by the Convention or the General 
Board for Christian education. 

(3) It shall formulate and promote plans for increasing the interest 
in and the support of these institutions and shall make reports in 
detail to the General Board upon all its work and findings. 

Sec C. Executive Secretary. 

The Council may in its discretion and out of funds provided by 
the Convention or its General Board for Christian education, em- 
ploy an Executive Secretary and such other assistance as may be 
deemed necessary. 

Sec D. Meetings. 

The Council shall meet at the call of the Chairman, at least three 
times during the Convention year; it may meet in special session 
at the call of the Chairman and Executive Secretary, or any five 
members. 



22 Baptist State Convention 

ARTICLE V. Convention Procedure 

Section A. Rules. 

The Rules of Order for the Convention shall be those laid down 
in Kerfoot's "Parliamentary Law," but in cases where the meaning 
may not be clear the President shall exercise his discretion, subject 
to appeal to the Convention. 

Sec. B. Resolutions. 

All resolutions presented to the Convention shall be referred to 
the Committee on Resolutions, except that by a two-thirds vote of 
the messengers present on the first or second day of the Convention, 
the rules may be suspended and a resolution be taken up for im- 
mediate consideration. 

Sec C. Recommendations in Reports. 

Nothing contained in reports to the Convention shall be construed 
as an action of the Convention except the recommendations which 
are definitely listed and adopted by the Convention. 

ARTICLE VI. Amendments to By-Laws 

The By-Laws may be altered by a majority vote of the messengers 
present on the first or second day of the Convention. 



PROCEEDINGS 



PROCEEDINGS j 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 16, 1948 

1. Responding to the call of President John W. Suttle, Shelby, 
the One Hundred Eighteenth Annual Session of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina convened in the First Baptist Church 
of Charlotte at 9:30 in the morning on November 16, 1948. At this 
first session many messengers were present, scores of whom arrived 
the evening before for the annual North Carolina Baptist Pastors' 
Conference. The service of the morning opened with John D. 
Holmes, Raleigh, Director of Music for this Convention, and Robert 
Rodwell, Charlotte, Organist of the host church, accompanying, 
leading the singing of "Blessed Assurance" and "We Are Marching 
to Zion." 

2. The song service continued with the male chorus of Wingate 
Junior College under the direction of Rommie Pierce singing "More 
Love To Thee" and "Shout All Over God's Heaven." 

3. In keeping with the general theme of the Convention, "Christ 
Is The Answer," based upon the Scripture, Col. 3:11, "But Christ Is 
All and In All," James S. Potter, Statesville, led in the opening de- 
votional service. 

4. President Suttle having previously named a Committee on 
Enrollment composed of the following: H. O. Baker, Chairman, 
Charlotte; Claude U. Broach, Charlotte; W. V. Tarlton, Concord; 
J. N. Watson, Marshville; J. Marvin Crowe, Charlotte; L. R. Evans, 
Charlotte; Raymond Long, Charlotte; J. D. Moose, Charlotte; Mrs. 
Guy Carswell, Charlotte; and, J. Ned Taylor, Bessemer City, recog- 
nized the Chairman of the Committee who announced that as of the 
opening hour of the Convention 600 messengers had registered. His 
motion carried that the present enrolled messengers and all other 
messengers duly registered during the remaining session constitute 
the Convention for the transaction of business. 

5. The Committee on Committees to function during this session 
as released at this time by the President consisted of the following : 

R. A. Ellis, Chairman, Salisbury; William Harrison Williams, 
Charlotte; S. Lewis Morgan, Dunn; W. P. Biggerstaff, Shelby; W. W. 
Finlator, Elizabeth City; Gordon L. Price, Roanoke Rapids; W. S. 
Caudle, Stovall; Garland A. Hendricks, Apex; Mrs. Gordon Maddrey, 
Ahoskie; Mrs. B. Y. Tyner, Raleigh; R. C. Foster, Whiteville; Donald 
G. Myers, Reidsville; B. S. Hensley, Sylva; Mrs. David Bobbitt, 
Charlotte; and Mrs. W. Perry Crouch, Asheville. 

6. In behalf of the Committee on Order of Business, Chairman 
F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh, offered the following Order of Business 
which upon his motion was accepted. 



26 Baptist State Convention 

ORDER OF BUSINESS 

BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, CHARLOTTE 

November 16-18, 1948 

John W. Suttle, President 

F. Orion Mixon, Vice-President 

M. L. Banister, Vice-President 

W. C. Reed, Vice-President 

Charles B. Deane, Recording Secretary 

John D. Holmes, Director of Music 

Robert Rodwell, Organist 

General Theme: Christ Is The Answer 

Scripture: Col. 3:11 "But Christ is all, and in all." 

TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 16 

9:30 Special Music 

Wingate College Male Chorus, Rommie Pierce, Director 

9:45 Praise and Prayer James S. Potter, Statesville 

9:55 Enrollment and Organization 

Report of Committee on Enrollment 
Report of Committee on Order of Business 

F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh, Chairman 
Committee on Committees Announced 
10:10 Recognition of Charlotte Pastors, New Pastors, and Visitors 
Special Music 

Wingate College Male Chorus, Rommie Pierce, Director 
10:20 "Christ is the Answer for the Individual" 

Casper C. Warren, Charlotte 

10:35 Report of Radio Committee L. J. Morriss, Raleigh 

10:50 Presentation of General Board's Report 

Clyde E. Baucom, President, Wilson 

11:50 Miscellaneous 

Special Music... Campbell College Choir, Mr. Strick, Director 

12:00 Convention Sermon E. V. Hudson, Cramerton 

Alternate C. C. Holland, Statesville 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

2:30 Praise and Prayer G. Van Stephens, Warsaw 

2:40 Miscellaneous 

Special Music, Meredith College Group of Nine 

Miss Beatrice Donley, Director 
2:50 Biblical Recorder 

Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro, Chairman, Board of Direc- 
tors 



of North Carolina 27 

3:10 Christ is the Answer in the Case of the Aged: 

Ministers' Relief and Retirement Louis S. Gaines, 

Fayetteville 

Message Mrs. Francis Hayes, Charlotte 

3:30 Home for the Aged Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh 

3:40 Christ is the Answer in Our Homes 

W. Perry Crouch, Asheville 
4:00 Christ is the Answer in Human Relationships 

R. M. Lee, Mars Hill, Chairman of Committee on Social 
Service and Civic Righteousness, Presiding 
Message J. B. Weatherspoon, Louisville, Ky. 

TUESDAY EVENING 
Session Theme: Christ is the Answer in Our State 
7:15 Special Music. ...Campbell College Choir, Mr. Strick, Director 

7:30 Praise and Prayer Lowell F. Sodeman, Clinton 

7:40 Report of Committee on Committees 

Miscellaneous 
7:45 Christ is the Answer in Evangelism 

H. G. Hammett, Chairman of Committee on Evangelism 
J. C. Canipe, Secretary of Evangelism 
8:15 Christ is the Answer in State Missions 

E. L. Spivey, Presiding 
Special Music, Meredith College Group of Nine 

Miss Beatrice Donley, Director 
9:00 Christ is the Answer in Stewardship 

Duke K. McCall, Nashville, Tenn. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 17 
Session Theme: Christ is the Answer in our Education 

9:30 Praise and Prayer W. Isaac Terrell, Oxford 

9:40 Report of Committees 
9 : 50 Miscellaneous 

Special Music Mars Hill College 

10:00 Christ is the Answer in Our Seminaries 
J. Clyde Turner, Raleigh, Presiding 
Recognition of Seminary Representatives 

Message J. B. Weatherspoon, Louisville, Ky. 

10:20 Christ is the Answer in Our Baptist Student Union 

James W. Ray, Raleigh 
10:35 Christ is the Answer in Our Sunday Schools 

L. L. Morgan, Raleigh 

Message W. L. Howse, Fort Worth, Texas 

10:55 Christ is the Answer in Our Training Union 

Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh 
Message Jerry E. Lambdin, Nashville, Tenn. 



28 Baptist State Convention 

11:15 Christ is the Answer in Associational Missions 

G. W. BULLARD 

11:25 Announcements 

Special Music Mars Hill College 

11:30 Christ is the Answer: In the Home 

George W. Heaton, Charlotte 
11:55 Christ is the Answer: In the Church 

W. L. Howse, Fort Worth, Texas 
12:20 Christ is the Answer: In Our Colleges 

Solon B. Cousins, Richmond, Va. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 
Session Theme: Christ is the Answer in Our Citizenship 

2:30 Praise and Prayer W. P. Biggerstaff, Shelby 

2:40 Report of Council on Christian Education 

C. Sylvester Green, Durham, Chairman 
Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, Executive Secretary 
Recognition of Colleges 
2:50 Report of Enlargement Program for Wake Forest College 

Casper C. Warren, Presiding 
3:30 Election of Officers 
3:40 North Carolina Baptist Hospital 

W. J. Conrad, Jr., Winston-Salem 
Special Music, Wake Forest A Cappella Choir 

Thane McDonald, Director 
4:00 Christ is the Answer in Our Citizenship 

J. M. Dawson, Washington, D. C. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING 

7:15 Special Music, First Baptist Church, Charlotte 

Gertrude Gower, Director 

7:30 Praise and Prayer Jack R. Bagwell, Asheville 

7 : 40 Report of Committees 

7 : 50 American Bible Society 

8:00 Report from the Sunday School Board 

J. S. Hopkins, High Point, Presiding 

Message Jerry E. Lambdin, Nashville, Tenn. 

8:20 Christ is the Answer in Woman's Missionary Union 

Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh, President 

Message. Mrs. G. R. Martin, Norfolk, Va. 

8 : 50 Christ is the Answer in World Missions 

Ralph Herring, Winston-Salem, Presiding 
Southern Baptist Relief. ...Eugene Howard, New Orleans, La. 
Special Music, Wake Forest A Capella Choir 

Thane McDonald, Director 
9:00 Message John Abernathy, China 



of North Carolina 29 

THURSDAY MORNING 

9:30 Praise and Prayer W. P. Milne, Aulander 

9:40 Report of Committees 

Trustees of the Convention 

Committee to Report on General Board's Report 
Historical Commission 
Music Committee 
10:00 Baptist Foundation 
10:15 Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina 

I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill, Chmn. of Board of Trustees, Pre- 
siding 
10:35 Christ is the Answer in Home Missions 

J. Roy Clifford, Lexington, Presiding 

Message John Caylor, Atlanta, Ga. 

11:05 Committee Reports 

11:20 Reading of Journal 

11:25 Memorials 

11:30 Special Music, Myers Park Church, Charlotte 

Alice Berman, Director 
11:35 Christ is the Answer in Our Preaching 

J. Clyde Turner, Raleigh 

F. Orion Mixon, Chairman J. Marvin Crowe 

Perry Crouch S. Lewis Morgan, Jr. 

J. Samuel Johnson Avery M. Church 

Earl J. Rogers J. C. Meigs 

W. Walter Jones 

7. All pastors living in the host city were invited and they came 
forward at the call of William Harrison Williams, Pastor at Pritchard 
Memorial Baptist Church, and were introduced as follows: 

Casper C. Warren A. B. Wood 

J. Clyde Yates H. O. Baker 

T. H. Biles R. J. Taylor 

J. D. Moose Claude U. Broach 

Raymond Long G. P. Lanier 

R. S. Liner W. Guy Helms 

R. B. Ostwalt J. D. Griffin 

David E. Bobbitt H. L. Ferguson 

James P. Blackwelder M. G. Chapman 

O. A. Wright Vern T. Helms 

George D. Heaton M. H. Drye 

C. E. Sullivan C. W. Propst 

8. Thirty-three new pastors who had entered into pastorates 
within the State since the last Convention came forward and were 
introduced by General Secretary M. A. Huggins and extended 
cordial welcome by President Suttle, these ministers being: 



30 Baptist State Convention 

R. G. Bennett, Cornelius; James P. Blackwelder, Charlotte; B. V. 
Broadway, Thomasville; Rex Campbell, West Jefferson; F. A. Cuth- 
riell, Elizabeth City; Wendell G. Davis, Statesville; Ernest W. Glass, 
Chadbourn; A. M. Glisson, Whiteville; Caleb W. Goodwin, Jr, Spot; 
T. Sloane Guy, Jr., Wadesboro; Samuel T. Habel, Jr., Chapel Hill; 
Virgil M. Hailey, Kannapolis; A. S. Hale, High Point; Harlan Harris, 
Shelby; W. T. Hendrix, Salisbury; John W. Kincheloe, Jr., Raleigh; 
J. W. Levan, Statesville; William L. Lynch, Siler City, Roy R. Mc- 
Culloch, Clinton; P. J. McLean, Lumberton; W. D. Morris, Scotland 
Neck; R. Carrington Paulette, Mount Airy; C. W. Pope, Wadesboro; 
Carlton S. Prickett, Burlington; George E. Reynolds, Aulander; O. W. 
Rhodenhiser, Winston-Salem; Lewis E. Rhodes, Greensboro; Herman 
T. Stevens, Buie's Creek; Warren F. Taylor, Murfreesboro; Ernest C. 
Upchurch, Lewiston; S. Guy Walker, Gastonia; T. C. Williams, Jr., 
Gibsonville; Ralph H. Yarborough, Monroe. 

9. Regular Order was momentarily interrupted when J. A. 
Morris of Murphy presented to President Suttle a gavel made from 
a plum tree growing on the grounds of the home place of Dr. George 
W. Truitt. 

10. Upon the motion of M. A. Huggins, Raleigh, a message of 
bereavement was forwarded to Mrs. W. D. Poe, Oxford, as the Con- 
vention recalled the many years of faithful service of her husband. 
His motion also included the suggestion that Secretary Charles B. 
Deane, Rockingham, extend greeting to the following friends of the 
Convention prevented from attending the sessions: 

Charles E. Maddry W. R. Cullom 

Charles H. Durham L. R. Evans 

I. P. Hedgepeth John Arch McMillan 

Walt N. Johnson T. F. Deitz 

Hight C. Moore R. E. Heath 

B. W. Spilman E. V. Plemmons 

A. Paul Bagby W. W. Williams 

11. In keeping with this spirit of greetings the Secretary dis- 
patched a telegram to the Baptist State Conventions of Alabama, 
Arkansas, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi and 
South Carolina, which states were holding their annual conventions. 

12. President Suttle cordially welcomed the many visitors present 
for this opening session of the Convention and all others who may 
join in the fellowship of this One Hundred Eighteenth Annual 
Session. 

13. The Wingate College Male Chorus with Rommie Pierce di- 
recting sang, "More Love to Thee," "Some O' These Days," and 
"Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken." 

14. In keeping with the theme of the Convention Casper C. 
Warren, host pastor, brought the opening message using as his topic, 
"Christ Is the Answer for the Individual." 



of North Carolina 



31 



15. Proceeding with the regular order, special emphasis was 
placed upon the report of the Radio Committee presented by L. J. 
Morriss, Raleigh, Chairman, this report in detail being included in 
the advanced report of the General Board, Section 122, page 108. 
The report was received with appreciation as a matter of informa- 
tion at this time to be acted upon in the consideration of the full 
report of the General Board. 

16. President Suttle recognized Vice-President F. Orion Mixon, 
Raleigh, who with Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson, President of the Gen- 
eral Board, presided during the next order, as General Secretary 
M. A. Huggins presented the advanced report of the General Board 
covering all phases of the Convention's program. Secretary Huggins 
characterized the report as "a good report from a great people." The 
many phases of the Convention's program were well presented 
during this hour and are recorded in full, beginning section 108, 
page 89. 

Song: "Draw Me Nearer." 

17. The Committee on Committees through the Chairman R. 
Archie Ellis, Salisbury, announced at this time and at other periods 
during the sessions of the Convention the following Committees, 
who upon his motion were elected: 



COMMITTEES TO REPORT DURING THE 1948 
CONVENTION 

Committee to Report on General Board's Report 



Cloude U. Broach, Chairman, 

Charlotte 
H. H. Stembridge, Forest City 
S. F. Hudson, Lillington 
Ernest W. Glass, Chadbourn 
C. M. Warren, Sylva 
R. N. Carroll, Edenton 
Don C. Young, Asheville 
J. Clyde Turner, Raleigh 
Mrs. W. Walter Jones, Lenoir 
W. A. Elam, Franklinville 
E. F. Baker, Winston-Salem 



R. O. Brinkley, China Grove 

Mrs. J. R. Everett, Maiden 

R. Knolan Benfield 

J. Clyde Yates, Charlotte 

R. A. Cadle, Apex 

W. G. Russell, Mount Holly 

C. D. Bain, Dunn 

J. B. Currin, Roxboro 

Mrs. G. Carl Lewis, Wilmington 

Mrs. D. H. Craver, Boonville 

A. J. Whitley, Jr., Smithfield 

John T. Coley, Rocky Mount 



L. C. Pinnix, Chairman, Kings 

Mountain 
Forest Maxwell, Erwin 
Miss Edith Mauldin, Albemarle 
M. G. Cox, Asheville 



Committee on Place and Preacher 

Broadus Jones, Raleigh 



Mrs. W. W. Finlator, Elizabeth 

City 
Horace Smith, Canton 
Mrs. Howard Dawkins, Kinston 



Herbert N. Jenkins, Sr., Aulander 



32 



Baptist State Convention 



Committee on Resolutions 

Robert Lee Humber, Chairman, 

Greenville 
W. P. Milne, Aulander 
Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville 
Roy McCullock, Clinton 
Oscar Creech, Ahoskie 
Robert Costner Knightdale 



S. L. Lamm, Bryson City 
Troy Jones, Carrboro 
Mrs. George Pennell, Asheville 
T. Sloane Guy, Jr., Wadesboro 
John W. Kincheloe, Jr., Raleigh 
W. W. Hamilton, Jr., Washington 
Mrs. Ed Perry, Rockingham 



COMMITTEES TO REPORT DURING THE 1949 
CONVENTION 

Committee on Order of Business 



J. Glenn Blackburn, Chairman, 

Wake Forest 
Miss Ruth Provence, Raleigh 
Lee Pridgen, Louisburg 
Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, Clayton 



N. C. Teague, Lexington 
Nane Starnes, Asheville 
Warren T. Carr, Durham 
J. H. Moore, Elizabeth City 
Mrs. J. Wilbur Bunn, Raleigh 



Committee on Publicity 

L. L. Carpenter, Chairman, Robert Williams, Raleigh 

Raleigh R. E. Price, Rutherfordton 

J. A. McMillan, Thomasville Herbert Peele, Elizabeth City 

Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness 



B. Y. Tyner, Chairman, Raleigh 
W. J. Bradley, Albemarle 
Harlan Harris, Shelby 
Clarence H. Patrick, Wake Forest 
Thomas J. Lassiter, Smithfield 
Dover Fouts, Burnsville 
Charles B. McConnell, Cullowhee 



Frank Malone, Gastonia 



Sam T. Habel, Jr., Chapel Hill 
Mrs. Titus Harrison, Whiteville 
Gordon Maddrey, Ahoskie 
H. P. Taylor, Wadesboro 
T. Paul Deaton, Hillsboro 
George Heaton, Charlotte 
C. W. Duling, Hertford 



Comittee to Nominate Members of 
Directors of Institutions and 

E. Norfleet Gardner, Chairman, 

Henderson 
Wm. Harrison Williams, Char- 
lotte 
Mrs. J. Winston Pearce, Durham 
Mrs. J. S. Farmer, Raleigh 
T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia 
W. Perry Crouch, Asheville 
A. P. Stephens, Lumberton 
Mrs. Harry B. Caldwell, Greens- 
boro 



the General Board, Trustees and 
Agencies of the Convention 

S. L. Morgan, Sr., Wake Forest 
Wyman Washburn, Boiling 

Springs 
Hugh Monteith, Sylva 
Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton 
S. B. Hagler, Leaksville 
John T. Wayland, North Wilkes- 

boro 
Lee Weathers, Shelby 



of North Carolina 



33 



Radio Advisory Committee 

L. J. Morriss, Chairman, Raleigh S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn 
Thane McDonald, Wake Forest Claude B. Bowen, Greensboro 

Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City 



Committee on Memorials 



Phil L. Elliott, Chairman, 

Boiling Springs 
Owen Odom, Coats 
George N. Cowan, Rocky Mount 



J. B. Willis, Hamlet 
C. F. Rogers, Biltmore Station, 
Asheville 



Historical Commission 



George W. Paschal, Chairman, 

Wake Forest 
W. N. Cook, Webster 
Charles M. Heck, Raleigh 
J. G. Lane, Raleigh, Route 2 
J. Clyde Turner, Raleigh 
Willis G. Briggs, Raleigh 
Mrs. E. T. Crittenden, Wake 

Forest 



J. W. Whitley, Albemarle 
J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs 
L. E. M. Freeman, Raleigh 
Miss Mary Lynch Johnson, 

Raleigh 
Miss Addie Mae Cooke, Murphy 
John A. Oates, Fayetteville 



Music Committee 



Horace Easom, Chairman, Shelby 
Harry Cooper, Raleigh 
Stephen Morrisett, Boiling 

Springs 
Robert Guy, Ridgecrest 
Mrs. A. E. Lynch, Buies's Creek 



John Holmes, Raleigh 
J. Grady Miller, Winston-Salem 
Earl Robinson, St. Pauls 
Miss Martha Ellen Barr, 
Elizabeth City 



Committee to Secure Student Center Property at Chapel Hill 



Grover H. Jones, Chairman, 

High Point 
J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro 
Maurice Hill, Morganton 
Julian Allsbrook, Roanoke 

Rapids 



Winfield Blackwell, Winston- 
Salem 
I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill 
J. M. Phipps, Chapel Hill 
Rush S. Dickson, Charlotte 
J. Ed Broyhill, Lenoir 



J. B. Efird, Charlotte 



Nominations for Allied Church League 



R. E. Price, Rutherfordton 

T. P. Pruitt, Hickory 

A. W. Kincaid, Kings Mountain 

L. L. Hatfield, Hickory 

T. L. Gardner, Reidsville 

Grover H. Jones, High Point 

L. E. Andrews, Lexington 



J. H. Early, Winston-Salem 
Merrill J. Evans, Ahoskie 
T. E. Story, North Wilkesboro 
Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro 
LeRoy Martin, Raleigh 
Walter E. Crissman High Point 
Santford Martin, Winston-Salem 



34 



Baptist State Convention 



H. L. Stewart, Clinton 
E. Yates Webb, Shelby 

E. C. Roach, Denton 

F. H. Brooks, Smithfield 

B. A. Bowers, Ridgecrest 
M. Leslie Davis, Beaufort 
L. A. Martin, Lexington 
Harry B. Caldwell, Greensboro 

C. H. Durham, Lumberton 
Mrs. T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia 
C. E. Brady, Salisbury 

J. Marvin Crowe, Charlotte 
W. J. Berryman, Edenton 
C. C. Wrenn, Siler City 
E. Knox Proctor, Whiteville 
John A. Oates, Fayetteville 
Clarence Poe, Raleigh 
I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill 
J. A. McMillan, Thomasville 
L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh 
M. A. Huggins, Raleigh 



J. O. Bowman, Wadesboro 
Mrs. Irene Avent Mills, Louis- 
burg 
O. L. Moore, Laurinburg 
M. L. Banister, Oxford 
E. F. Sullivan, Hickory 
James M. Hayes, Winston-Salem 
J. Y. Joyner, LaGrange 
T. E. Walters, Ridgecrest 
W. H. Weatherspoon, Raleigh 
J. Clyde Turner, Raleigh 
M. M. Jernigan, Dunn 
H. B. Anderson, Durham 
Theo B. Davis, Zebulon 
L. R. Varser, Lumberton 
Roger E. Williams, Oxford 
Mrs. T. H. Plemmons, Charlotte 
Lee Weathers, Shelby 
H. L. Ferguson, Charlotte 
H. K. Masteller, Asheboro 
E. W. Pate, Wilmington 



A. J. Smith, Goldsboro 



Committee on Evangelism 

H. G. Hammett, Chairman, Durham 

Alexander — E. V. Bumgarner, Taylorsville 

Alleghany — F. G. Walker, Sparta 

Anson — J. C. Meigs, Polkton 

Ashe — R. C. Ashley, Bina 

Atlantic — J. L. Hodges, New Bern 

Avery — J. W. Costner, Newland 

Beulah — J. F. Funderburk, Roxboro 

Bladen — A. D. Frazier, Elizabethtown 

Blue Ridge — M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion 

Brunswick — -Herbert M. Baker, Southport 

Brier Creek — G. D. White, Route 5, Statesville 

Brushy Mountain — A. W. Eller, Route 1, Wilkesboro 

Buncombe — M. D. Smith, Candler 

Cabarrus — W. V. Tarlton, Concord 

Caldwell — W. F. Woodall, Lenoir 

Carolina — Fred Poplin, Fletcher 

Catawba River — Fred Forester, Drexel 

Chowan — F. A. Cuthriell, Elizabeth City 

Columbus — S. N. Lamb, Cerro Gordo 

Dan Valley — H. Fletcher Lambert, Leaksville 

Dock — Gaston Hester, Bladenboro 

Eastern — J. B. Case, Rose Hill 

Elkin — Howard J. Ford, Elkin 

Flat River — W. S. Caudle, Stovall 



or North Carolina 35 



French Broad— M. H. Kendall, Mars Hill 

Gaston — T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia 

Green River — R. B. Greene, Route 1, Try on 

Haywood — M. C. Wyatt, Route 1, Waynesville 

Johnston — J. C. Cammack, Jr., Smithfield 

Kings Mountain — Boyd Cannon, Shelby 

Liberty — E. F. Baker, Route 5, Winston-Salem 

Little River — G. Scott Turner, Chalybeate Springs 

Macon — Charles E. Parker, Franklin 

Mecklenburg — J. Clyde Yates, Charlotte 

Mitchell — Roy Campbell, Bakersville 

Montgomery — Joe C. Hough, Star 

Mount Zion — L. A. Nail, Burlington 

New Found — R. B. Vaughn, Marshall 

Neuse — Howard G. Dawkins, Kinston 

New South River — G. N. Ashley, Salemburg 

Pee Dee — Ernest W. Moore, Rockingham 

Piedmont — J. S. Hopkins, High Point 

Pilot Mountain — R. E. Adams, Winston-Salem 

Raleigh — Joe F. Roach, Route 2, Wendell 

Randolph — Chas. J. McBride, High Point 

Roanoke — Paul Nickens, Plymouth 

Roberson — J. L. Mouney, Red Springs 

Rowan — O. D. Moore, Salisbury 

Sandy Creek — Roy A. Morris, Sanford 

Sandy Run — Tom S. Lawrence, Cliffside 

South Fork — J. Louis Price, Hickory 

South Mountain — A. V. Ledford, Icard 

South Yadkin — H. Paul Reese, Statesville 

Stanly— W. W. Hill, Albemarle 

Stone Mountain— -S. L. Blevins, Hays 

Stony Fork — W. J. Cook, Boone 

Surry — Lonnie Fleming, Mount Airy 

Tar River — M. A. Pegram, Route 2, Zebulon 

Three Forks — C. O. Vance, Vilas 

Tennessee River — S. L. Lamm, Bryson City 

Transylvania — Clyde Collins, Brevard 

Tuckaseigee — B. S. Hensley, Sylva 

Union — J. N. Watson, Marshville 

West Chowan- — Jarvis W. Teague, Seaboard 

West Liberty — W. T. Truett, Culberson 

Western North Carolina — T. Earl Ogg, Andrews 

Wilmington — Ben B. Ussery, Carolina Beach 

Yadkin — D. L. Temple, Jonesville 

Yancey — A. Z. Jamerson, Burnsville 

Yates — H. B. Anderson, Durham 

Burnt Swamp — L. W. Jacobs, Pembroke 

Cherokee— William Welch, Cherokee 



36 Baptist State Convention 

18. A report on registration was received from H. O. Baker, 
Charlotte, who announced a total registration of messengers of 822 
and visitors 167. 

19. A feature of the Convention program was the appearance 
of choral groups from the different Baptist colleges. The Camp- 
bell College Chorus under the direction of Alfred Strick accompanied 
by Mrs. A. C. Lynch at this time presented two numbers: "Ave 
Verim" and "Steal Away." 

20. The morning session ended with the Convention sermon. The 
scripture read by C. C. Holland, Statesville, was taken from 
the 13th Chapter of Hebrews. The sermon was preached by E. V. 
Hudson, Cramerton, on "The Unchanging Christ," using as his text, 
"Jesus Christ, the same yesterday, and today, and forever." 

TUESDAY— Afternoon Session 

21. With President Suttle presiding, the second session convened 
at 2:30 in the afternoon and G. Van Stephens, Warsaw, led the praise 
and prayer service. 

22. Under miscellaneous the Secretary read the following tele- 
gram from the Atlantic Baptist Association which was received and 
referred to the Committee on Resolutions: 

Morehead City, N. C. 
Rev. J. W. Suttle, President, October 30, 1948 

North Carolina Baptist State Convention, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

The Atlantic Baptist Association, in the 65th annual session, 
passed a unanimous resolution to be presented to the Baptist State 
Convention, petitioning the Convention, convening November 16, 17 
and 18, to demand the repeal of the North Carolina para mutual 
gambling law in the coming General Assembly. The committee is 
asking to be granted eight minutes during the Convention. 

John H. Bunn, Clerk. 

23. The Meredith College choral group was the third group of 
young people from the Baptist college campuses to sing for the 
Convention. This group was under the direction of Miss Beatrice 
Donley, assisted at the piano by Miss Betty Compton. The num- 
bers they used were "O, Lord Most Holy" and "Lift Thine Eyes." 

24. Wilson Woodcock, Greensboro, Chairman of the Board of 
Directors of the Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, read the following 
report from the Directors and prior to its adoption, upon his motion 
the Biblical Recorder Editor, L. L. Carpenter, addressed the Con- 
vention. 

Report of Directors of Biblical Recorder, Inc. 

The Directors of Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, submit herewith 
to the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina their report for 
the year ended September 30, 1948. 

Two meetings of the Directors have been held. The first was on 
January 20, 1948, for the purpose of organization and making plans 



of North Carolina 37 

for the year. The second meeting was on October 19, 1948, for the 
purpose of reviewing the year's record, receiving and examining 
reports of the Business Manager and of the Auditors, and adopting 
this report to the Convention. The Executive Committee met two 
times in between the meetings of the Directors for counsel with 
the Editor and to consider necessary matters of business. 

During the past year the circulation of the Recorder has remained 
practically stationary, the total net gain for the year being between 
three and four hundred. However, during the last six years the 
circulation has increased from approximately 11,000 to 44,354. 
Breakdown of Circulation as of October 1, 1948: 

Clubs ($1.50 rate) 14,707 

Every-Family ($1.20 rate) 26,953 

Pastors ($1.50 rate) 1,268 

Individual ($2.00 rate) 800 

Hospitals, Libraries, Students, Y.M. and Y.W.C.A.'s 

($1.50 rate) 450 

Exchanges, Missionaries, Advertising (Com.) 176 



Total Circulation October 1, 1948 44,354 

Statement of Profit and Loss 
October 1, 1947 — September 30, 1948 
Revenue 

From Circulation $68,737.95 

LESS: Returned 

Checks 6.00 $68,731.95 



From Advertising.. 13,385.85 

From Sale of Cuts.. 521.91 

From Miscellaneous 26.07 



Total Revenue $82,665.78 

Expenses 

Advertising Department $ 785.07 

Insurance 104.04 

Miscellaneous 548.90 

Office 744.15 

Printing Contract 40,864.07 

Print Paper 23,713.44 

Postage 3,448.79 

Rent 960.00 

Retirement Annuity 458.79 

Salary 18,855.52 

Telephone 247.46 

Travel 829.85 

Depreciation 182.56 



Total Expense 91,742.64 



Net Loss for Fiscal Year Ending September 

30, 1948 $ 9,076.86 



38 Baptist State Convention 

The following statement is taken from the audit made by A. T. 
Allen & Company, Certified Public Accountants: 

"We found the books in balance and excellently kept. Trial 
balances and financial and operating statements are being 
regularly prepared. 

"Our examination did not disclase any evidence of irregu- 
larities and we believe the funds have been carefully and 
honestly handled and all accounted for. 

"We hereby certify that, we have audited the books and 
records of the Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, Raleigh, North 
Carolina, as of September 30, 1948, and prepared the within 
statements. In our opinion the correct financial condition of 
the business is shown, together with the result of operations 
for the twelve months ended at that time." 

Our total revenue for the past fiscal year ending September 30, 
1948, amounted to $82,665.78; but the total expenses for the same 
period were $91,742.64. This gives us a net loss for the period of 
$9,076.86. This, along with an accumulated deficit of $1,823.40 
during the last several years since the Convention bought the Re- 
corder, makes a total deficit as of September 30, 1948, of $10,900.26. 
According to the action of the Convention last year, the General 
Board was authorized to set up a plan of support for the Recorder 
to meet our needs. However, we could not anticipate the big in- 
creases in costs and therefore we have had to face this deficit. At 
the request of the directors of the Biblical Recorder the General 
Board has authorized the treasurer of the Convention to pay us 
the $10,900.26 accumulated deficit out of the Cooperative Program 
funds before distribution to south-wide causes, since the Recorder 
promotes both state and south-wide causes. 

With this deficit wiped out this year, we figure that we can come 
out free of debt in 1949, with the Convention continuing to pay 
for advertising and promotional pages at a slight increase in ad- 
vertising rates and with the Recorder itself increasing its subscrip- 
tion rates from $1.20, $1.50, and $2.00 to $1.50, $2.00, and $2.50 
per week for the Every-Family, club, and individual subscriptions 
respectively, beginning January 1, 1949. 

We regret very much to increase our subscription prices, but 
this policy is absolutely necessary unless we get a much larger 
grant from the Convention. During the last ten years, for instance, 
costs of publishing the Biblical Recorder have practically doubled 
and yet the subscription price of the Recorder has not been increased 
during that time; but actually the subscription prices have been 
lower for thousands of our subscribers because of the Every-Family 
Plan. At the present time every subscription which we have costs 
us $2.22 per year to publish and mail to the subscriber. Also, the 
cost for every page of advertising is $101.55. We have been charging 
the State Convention and all our state institutions only $60.00 per 



of North Carolina 39 

page for advertising, and also the same rate for the Home and 
Foreign Mission Boards. Therefore, for every one of these pages 
we have published we have contributed to the cause or given free 
to the institution $40.55. If the Convention had paid us the full 
cost of all advertising for the past year, we would have received 
an additional $5,063.60. In the light of these facts, we feel that it 
was proper for the Convention to pay us the $10,900.26 deficit for 
the present year. 

From the report of the Editor we note that he has filled engage- 
ments during the year in approximately twenty-five churches, at- 
tended thirty-five associational meetings, directed three Better 
Bible Teaching Clinics, attended several conferences of the Con- 
vention, including the annual meeting of the Southern Baptist 
Editors. 

In view of this good report the directors wish again to express 
gratitude for the leadership of our editor, who has endeared himself 
to the members of the churches of our state. And we express our 
appreciation to the members of the staff who assist in the publication 
of the Biblical Recorder. The sane guidance of those who have led 
in putting the paper into the homes of our people has helped to 
hold North Carolina Baptists true to the ideals of our denomination, 
and has promoted a unity among our people. We commend them 
to the prayers and confidence of our constituency, and look forward 
to still greater achievements in the years ahead. 

Recommendations 

1. We recommend that the Convention again go on record as 
favoring the Every-Family Plan for subscriptions to the Recorder, 
and that all pastors and church leaders be urged to support this 
plan and help place the paper in every Baptist home in North Caro- 
lina. 

2. We consider it good policy to keep the subscription rates as 
low as possible so as to get the Recorder in as many homes as pos- 
sible, yet produce a paper of high quality. However, we approve 
the plan of the Recorder in increasing its subscription rates from 
$1.20, $1.50, and $2.00 to $1.50, $2.00, and $2.50 for Every-Family, 
club, and individual subscriptions respectively, beginning January 
1, 1949. In addition, we recommend that the General Board be 
authorized and empowered to extend aid to the Biblical Recorder 
during 1949 on the same basis and according to the same plan 
followed during 1948, and with the understanding that the Board 
of Directors of the Recorder and the General Board set up the plans 
in such a way as to meet the financial needs of the Recorder during 
1949. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Wilson Woodcock, Chairman. 



40 Baptist State Convention 

25. Notice was given by Chairman Woodcock that it was the 
desire of the Board of Directors to change the annual meeting of 
the Directors to Monday after the third Sunday in October, this 
notice being necessary to conform to Article IV, Section 3, of the 
Charter of the Biblical Recorder, Incorporated. 

26. Under the heading, "Christ Is The Answer in the Case of the 
Aged," Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville, discussed ministers' relief and 
retirement and the message of the hour was brought by Mrs. Francis 
Hayes, Charlotte. 

27. The subject was continued by Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh, 
who addressed her remarks to "The Home for the Aged." 

28. W. Perry Crouch, Asheville, then discussed the subject, 
"Christ is the Answer in our Homes." 

29. The theme of the Convention was extended in the Report 
of the Committee on Social Service and Civic Righteousness read 
by R. M. Lee, Mars Hill, Chairman. Upon the motion of the Chair- 
man, the Committee report was adopted as follows: 

Report of the Committee on Social Service 
and Civic Righteousness 

The members of the Baptist churches of North Carolina play a 
major role in the civic, moral and social life of our state. Since we 
constitute almost one-fifth of the entire population of the state 
our place is vital; our responsibility is large, and we cannot escape 
our obligations to society. 

Your committee feels that there exist two important conditions 
in our state. First, there are a host of Christian people in our 
ranks who are loyal to the ideals and teachings of Jesus; who in 
private and public life strive to conform to the high standard of 
Christian principles. These by their daily lives have a tremendous 
influence for good upon society. In the second place, we must re- 
port the existence of many evil influences in society. It suffers from 
greed, intemperance, hate, racial prejudice, criminality, distrust, 
desecration of the Sabbath, communism, juvenile delinquency, dis- 
integration of the home, disputes between capital and labor, and 
many other destructive forces. These and other evils are at work 
in society largely because of a deep-seated moral weakness, a 
lack of faith in God, in man as a spiritual reality, and because they 
are not inhibited by reason or by moral and spiritual controls. 
Wholesome habits, attitudes and behavior patterns among our peo- 
ple can be achieved only by keeping under control or in complete 
subjection the primitive impulses which are constantly operative 
in human nature and, therefore, in the social order. 

It is the purpose of your committee to point out more fully 
some of the existing evils of modern society and then to make 
certain recommendations which it believes to be sound and in keep- 
ing with Baptist doctrines and policies. 



of North Carolina 41 

Every day we are made more conscious of the great increase in 
legalized gambling, bookmaking, and lotteries present in our state 
and the nation. There is a strong tendency for our national radio 
programs to become national lotteries. The flood of prizes which 
are offered is averaging more than a million dollars every six 
weeks. There are approximately forty such programs on the net- 
works today under such names as "Stop the Music," "Take a Num- 
ber," "Break the Bank," "Strike it Rich," "Everybody Wins," and 
others. These have become such rackets that the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission has announced its intention to crack down and 
forbid such programs the use of the air in an effort to prevent 
radio from becoming a "national roulette wheel." Thousands of 
people attend them, even on Sunday evenings, expecting to win 
some grand prize which may vary from a fountain pen to a cash 
prize amounting to as much as $20,000. 

We deplore the increasing desecration of the Sabbath, which is 
largely the fault of adults. We are alarmed at the increasing com- 
mercial amusement places found available on Sunday, such as 
baseball, Sunday excursions, the increasing use of Sunday for civic 
enterprises, for the holding of civic and political conventions. 
These indicate that we are more and more making Sunday a na- 
tional holiday rather than a day of worship. 

We look with disfavor upon the increasing worldliness of our 
social life. Our public schools are prone to plan almost no social 
life except dances. There is a strong tendency toward the forma- 
tion of teen-age clubs and canteens which are modeled upon night- 
club procedures. The drunkenness and open betting at football 
games in North Carolina is a disgrace to the state. In the words 
of Dr. Chester Swor: "Many fathers and mothers plan events in 
their homes or clubs honoring their sons and daughters, and go 
about it with such a spirit that the children are logical in conclud- 
ing that according to parental values the 'goddess of popularity' is 
the chief divinity to be worshipped." 

Frankly, we are alarmed at the rising tide of personal dishonesty, 
and the disrespect and disregard for law and order, on the part of 
students in our public schools and colleges. The vast amount of 
cheating, gambling of every sort, stealing, the destruction of pri- 
vate and public property, and many other types of dishonesty are 
tragic in themselves; yet even more tragic is the fact that so many 
people who are caught in these dishonest acts resent being told 
that they are doing something wrong. It is our firm conviction 
that much of this practice begins in the home where there is a 
lack of teaching and guidance on the part of parents as to what is 
right and wrong, and thus there springs up a total disregard on the 
part of many children for parental authority and the rights of 
others. 

Beverage Alcohol 

The beverage alcohol problem is one which is ever before us. 
There are certain facts pertaining to our state and the nation to 



42 Baptist State Convention 

which we call attention. The legal sale of alcoholic liquors by the 
ABC stores in North Carolina amounts to more than $75,000,000 
per year. North Carolinians spent during the month of September 
$3,540,072.65 in ABC stores. One city in the state reports gross 
receipts from the ABC stores since last December 15 of $3,660,- 
829.35. During the school year of 1945-46 the total expenditures 
for elementary and secondary schools and for the colleges and uni- 
versities of North Carolina amounted to $65,250,600 (Southern 
Baptist Manual for 1948). It would appear that North Carolinians 
think more of their liquor than they do of educating their children. 

In the same period of time referred to, the citizens of New York 
State spent $457,204,780 for education and $1,149,402,962 for liquor. 
In the District of Columbia, our nation's capital, more than six 
times as much money was spent for liquor as for education. Many 
similar examples could be cited. 

According to a recent report the people of the United States 
spent in 1947 $9,640,000,000 for alcoholic beverages, but only 
$1,250,000,000 for all religious purposes and $5,200,000,000 for all 
education. 

We are told that since the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment 
fourteen years ago the American people have spent more than 
$65,000,000,000 for alcoholic beverages. According to a recent 
report there were in 1947 1,753 colleges and universities in the 
United States. By calculation one will find the $65,000,000 is 
enough money to erect 2,000 colleges and universities at a cost 
of $5,000,000 each; provide an endowment fund of $20,000,000 for 
each of the 2,000 schools; contribute an annual amount of $500,000 
for the operating expenses of each; and pay an annual salary of 
$5,000 each for 200,000 faculty members for a period of fourteen 
years. 

The expenditure of such vast sums for beverage alcohol cannot 
help having devastating effects upon the people in more ways 
than one. It means that many women and children go without 
food and clothing; that homes are wrecked and that there is an 
ever increasing number of chronic alcoholics, 3,750,000 of them 
in the United States. It also means a great increase in automobile 
accidents and deaths resulting from drunken drivers, increased 
crime and moral degeneration. 

Marriages and Divorces 

We are keenly aware of the ever increasing divorce rate with 
its consequent results. Statistics released from the office of Vital 
Statistics of the United States Public Health Service as of Septem- 
ber 11, 1948, show that there were 1,992,354 marriages in 1947 
with 471,000 divorces, or one divorce for every four marriages. 
The same source reveals that there were 33,800 marriages in North 
Carolina with 6,600 divorces, or one divorce for every five mar- 
riages. In many of our large cities more divorces are granted an- 



of North Carolina 43 

nually than there are marriages. The following table of statistics 
for the year 1947 constitutes a fair sample of what is taking place 
in some of our cities: 

Cities Marriages Divorces 

Baltimore, Maryland 1,378 3,886 

Hot Springs, Arkansas .1,050 1,800 

Jacksonville, Florida 1,786 1,942 

Memphis, Tennessee 1,858 1,951 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 4,105 3,887 

We recognize that there may be several causes for divorce, in 
the eyes of the law and modern society, such as ( 1 ) the ease with 
which a divorce may be secured, often times on very flimsy excuses; 
(2) the lack of proper training on the part of young people for 
marriage; (3) the great social change which has occurred in the 
last fifty years bringing about the growth of cities and a consequent 
relaxing of direct control over the conduct of individuals; (4) the 
increase in the economic level which makes it possible for more 
people to afford divorces; (5) the pleasure loving philosophy of 
the time which makes people less willing to tolerate an unsatis- 
factory marriage for the sake of other considerations; (6) the un- 
willingness of men and women to assume the responsibilities of 
married life; (7) the probable result of wrong impressions gained 
from modern movies which do not portray the sanctity and beauty 
of married life, but constantly show that which is degrading; (8) 
the result of too many hasty marriages, some of which are entered 
into as trial marriages. We consider the rapidly rising divorce rate 
as the greatest single disrupting force of the American home. 

Juvenile Delinquency 

On every hand there are limitless facts to remind us of the ever 
increasing acuteness of the problem of juvenile delinquency, which 
is a direct result of the breakdown of the basic institutions of the 
home, the school, and the society. There are perhaps three impor- 
tant reasons for this increase. First, parental neglect. A recent re- 
port shows that according to a survey of more than 2,000 juvenile 
delinquents made in Detroit — boys between the ages of 10 and 
17 — 80 per cent of them came from "good" families in comfortable 
circumstances. "The most common denominator in their back- 
ground was found to be parental neglect. Broken homes, alcoholism, 
other factors entered into many of the cases, but the chief fault 
appeared to lie with parents who were willing to give their children 
money when they asked for it, but not to devote their time to their 
interests." — (Greensboro Daily News, October 7, 1948.) 

Too many parents are too busy with other things. They are 
more interested in making money, in cocktail parties, and in fol- 
lowing after their own pleasures than they are in playing with 
and guiding the lives of the boys and girls with which God has 
blessed the home. A second cause is that of poverty. The child is 



44 Baptist State Convention 

unable to have even the necessities of life and thus early in life 
takes to stealing. The child is not only deprived of the necessities 
of life but is generally forced to live in crowded conditions amid 
filth and disease, and where often there are no moral standards. 
Third, the war with all of its back-wash, the lowering of moral 
standards, the neglect of the home on the part of parents who 
worked for an easy dollar while the sons and daughters walked 
the streets engaging in acts of crime. In 1945 twenty-one per cent 
of all persons arrested and finger printed for crime were boys and 
girls under 21 years of age, with the 17-year-olds leading the 
group. The increase in the crime rate among 17-year-old girls in 
1945 was 115 per cent above the average for a two-year period 
before the war. The percentage of increase for the boys in the same 
age group was twenty-nine per cent. 

Perhaps a fourth cause of juvenile delinquency is the lack of 
Sunday School and church attendance. Judge Sam Tatum of Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, reports that in his opinion, "The most widespread 
cause of delinquency is the failure of parents to surround their 
children with the moral atmosphere so essential to clean develop- 
ment." Out of the 2,700 boys and girls brought into his court, only 
seven had a record of regular attendance at Sunday School, and 
five out of the seven were not guilty of the crimes with which they 
were charged. Catherine Mackenzi in a report published in the 
New York Times states that in her conversation with boys and 
girls from eight to eighteen years of age representing more than 
20,000 youngsters, they gave as their reasons for child delinquency 
the following: 

1. War as the main cause. Mothers were working. 

2. Movies together with comic magazines and the radio. 

3. Not enough parental restriction. One group said, "Parents 
should know where their children are and what they are doing." 

Ross L. Homan reports the "Juvenile court judges are unani- 
mously convinced that juvenile delinquency is not essentially a 
youth problem, but a papa and mama problem, or a result of social 
conditions over which the youngsters have no control." 

Industrial Relations 

We recognize the presence of disagreements between capital and 
labor, due largely we believe to : (1) the constant demand made 
by organized labor for increased wages, which inevitably result 
in increased strikes and price rises; (2) to the reduction in the 
number of working hours and the decreased output of labor; (3) 
to the large profits reaped by some organizations and the apparent 
high pressure methods used by both organized labor and capital 
for favorable legislation; (4) to the lack of sympathetic under- 
standing on the part of some industrialists of the social and eco- 
nomic problems of the laboring class; (5) to the attitude of organ- 
ized labor toward recent labor legislation. 



of North Carolina 45 

Race Relations 

In the opinion of your committee, the growing tenseness in race 
relations is due largely to the agitation of certain radical groups 
who demand racial equality in every realm of our social, economic, 
political, educational, and religious life; to the presence of commu- 
nistic teachings, especially in our large industrial centers, and ap- 
parently even in our National Government. We cannot attribute 
all racial problems to the above conditions, but must admit that 
at least part of the problem is due to the inability and unwilling- 
ness of many white people to admit certain basic rights which are 
guaranteed to any citizen, white or colored, by the Constitution 
of the United States. It is gratifying to note that the number of 
those who do recognize that the negro and all the other minority 
groups ought to be treated with fairness and justice, is steadily in- 
creasing. 

Recommendations 

We, the members of your committee, realizing that we cannot 
cover every subject which affects the social and civic life of our 
people, therefore, confine ourselves to the foregoing subjects and 
make the following recommendations: 

1. General. We desire to register disapproval of all forms oi 
gambling and lotteries and recommend that young people be taught 
from their earliest consciousness that lying, stealing, cheating and 
gambling in any form, are wrong. We urge obedience to all law 
with instruction at home and an example at home and in public. 
Our children must be taught respect for authority and the preemi- 
nent place that law has in the American scene. They must receive, 
fundamentally from their parents and collaterally from the church, 
the schools, and the worth while youth-serving organizations in 
the community, the lessons of Godliness and righteousness. 

2. Beverage Alcohol. First, we recommend that as Christians we 
urge upon our legislature a state-wide referendum upon alcoholic 
beverages. Second, we recommend that we encourage the establish- 
ment and maintenance of clinics and other appropriate facilities, 
when competently conducted, for the diagnosis, referral and treat- 
ment of victims of alcohol. Third, we recommend the dissemina- 
tion of such information as is now available on pastoral counsel- 
ing of persons with alcoholic problems. Fourth, we recommend 
that an adequate educational program for teaching the evil effects 
of alcohol be placed in our schools and that the law requiring the 
teaching of temperance in the public schools be enforced. We 
would further recommend to Congress the passage of the Capper 
Bill to outlaw liquor advertising. 

3. Voting. We urge all citizens to exercise the right of the bal- 
lot in the light of Christian teachings, recognizing that it is through 
this means that we may elect to office competent leaders. We dis- 
approve of class legislation and call upon our legislators both 
state and national to eliminate legislation by pressure groups. 



46 Baptist State Convention 

4. Race Relations. In the matter of race relations your commit- 
tee feels that it cannot do better than to recommend to you the 
Charter of Faith and Principles as adopted by the Southern Baptist 
Convention in 1947, and which we quote here: 

"The time is upon us when we must consult our faith and bring 
ourselves to lay fresh hold upon those principles that are embedded 
in our Baptist faith and policy, and make them the basis of Chris- 
tian action. 

1. We believe in the Lordship of Christ: in order to act in his 
name in social relations we must love our neighbors, including our 
Negro neighbors, as ourselves. 

2. We believe in the Holy Spirit: since the day of Pentecost He 
has been breaking down middle walls of partition between races 
and alien groups and teaching men of open heart to keep the unity 
of the Spirit in the bonds of peace. 

3. We believe in the Bible as the word of God: in it is our au- 
thoritative summons to practice justice towards all people of all 
races. 

4. We believe in the dignity and worth of the individual man: 
irrespective of his race or position he has the right to develop in 
the measure of his divinely given capacity and to share in just 
measure the blessings of our Father's world. 

5. We believe in the fellowship of believers: a relationship which 
forbids us to allow worldly patterns of prejudice to drive a wedge 
between us and our Christian brothers of other races. 

6. We believe in the principle of democracy in government: in 
application it entails the recognition and defense of the natural 
and constitutional rights of all citizens irrespective of their origin 
and racial inheritance." 

The principles of conduct for this Charter of Faith and Principles 
were adopted by this convention a year ago and will be found on 
page 39-40 of the 1947 North Carolina Baptist Annual, which prin- 
ciples of conduct your committee wish to reemphasize. 

5. Education. We deplore the loss of so many fine teachers from 
our public schools and colleges, because of the low salaries, inade- 
quate housing facilities and social status in the community. We 
rejoice at the increased salaries received by our teachers and the 
promise of further increase. We rejoice at the increased financial 
support of our Baptist colleges, made possible through larger gifts 
to Christian education. We urge that salaries both in our public 
schools, in the state supported colleges, and in our Baptist colleges 
be made sufficient to attract to the teaching profession the best 
talent among our young people. We would further recommend 
that our Baptist senior colleges enlarge their teacher training 
facilities so that more Christian teachers may be sent out. 

6. Juvenile Delinquency. We recommend a restoration of the 
American home as a dependable, Godly influence. We recognize 



of North Carolina 47 

that perhaps the three greatest sources of strength from the Home- 
front are: (1) Parental teaching. "Parents should surround their 
children with constant unashamed teachings of God's word on such 
matters as honesty, purity, respect for law and order, sobriety, 
marriage, the proper observance of Sunday, and separateness of 
living in a world society." (2) Parental discipline. Every normal 
child needs parental discipline: a discipline which is made up of 
genuine love and concern, constant guidance, and necessary chastise- 
ment for inevitable violations. Parents who attempt to rear their 
children without wise discipline are themselves delinquent in their 
performance to God, to the state and to the child. (3) The family 
altar. We would urge upon every family the restoration or estab- 
lishment of the family altar, believing that the presence of the 
family altar in the home will assure right parental teaching and 
wise parental discipline. 

7. Communism. We recommend that North Carolina Baptists op- 
pose communism and totalitarian trends by active, positive Chris- 
tian influence and activity; that we affirm our united opposition to 
communism or any other force which seeks to destroy democracy 
and freedom. 

8. Industrial Relations. In the realm of industrial relations your 
committee feels that we should adopt the principles set forth in the 
report of the Social Service Committee to the Southern Baptist 
Convention and adopted by that body in its last meeting. These 
principles are: 

1. Our attitudes, our spirit, and our actions must be thoroughly 
Christian. We cannot accept as our guide less than the Christian 
ethic and ideal. 

2. Our dynamic as Christians is ever the same. It is love. This 
love, unlike the popular conception of love, is redemptive, unselfish, 
compassionate, understanding, tolerant, patient, and self-effacing. 

3. Legislation in this area as elsewhere, should be designed to 
protect the basic human rights of all men, and never the selfish 
greedy interests of the few. 

4. The road to man integrated Christian fellowship lies only in 
the direction of repentance and forgiveness. We call upon both 
management and labor to repent of all unworthy motives and ob- 
jectives in order that they might more easily come to reconciliation. 

5. The church can take only one side, and that is the side of 
justice, of honesty, and of fairness, for it is here that Christ himself 
stood and beyond Him, the prophet of Faith. It is not the business 
of the church to take sides with either management or labor, but 
it is the business of the church to proclaim the ideals of Jesus 
Christ. The church is ideally fitted for the role of mediator to 
"break down the middle wall" of misunderstanding and of the op- 
posing groups to "create a new man in Christ Jesus." 

6. We recognize the right of the leaders of management on the 
one hand to organize their capital, and the right of the wage 
earners on the other hand to organize their labor. We maintain 



48 Baptist State Convention 

that such organization on the part of both groups should be for 
the mutual well-being of each and not for the advantage of the one 
over the other. 

7. Recognizing that the right to legitimate profit is basic in our 
economic system but that ruthless and unjust exploitations which 
ignore fundamental human rights and values is a violation of our 
democratic way of life and of our Christian ideals, we call upon 
all men of whatever station or rank to recognize a higher, more 
worthy motive than the motive of profit. This is difficult in a day 
when the dollar has been deified and enthroned as the "messiah of 
materialism." But human values far exceed material values, for 
in the words of one who so believed and taught, "... what shall 
it profit a man if he shall gain all the material wealth of the world 
and lose his own soul." 

9. Marriage and Family Relations. With the increasing problems 
created by the lax marriage and divorce laws, which endanger the 
stability of family life, we recommend that our pastors give serious 
thought to the development of a church forum on home problems. 
It is felt that in such a forum our people may discover better 
methods of teaching our young people how to live as Christians 
in our age; that Christian solutions may be found for the problems 
created by broken homes. We recommend that a more adequate 
and comprehensive counseling program for our young people be 
provided; that a more adequate and wholesome recreational pro- 
gram be sponsored by our churches. We would recommend that 
our churces provide a series of studies in the Christian ideals of 
courtship and marriage and that they be taught the truth about 
the Roman Catholic Church and marriage with Roman Catholics. 

10. World Peace. We recommend that this convention urge upon 
the President and Congress greater efforts in the interest of world 
peace. We further recommend the approval of Dr. Humber's idea of 
World Federation and World Government as one of the most 
promising avenues toward the establishment of world brotherhood 
and lasting peace. 

Finally, your committee does not believe that we can establish 
social purity and civic righteousness by adopting codes of law or 
sets of rules. We probably have sufficient knowledge and intel- 
lectual power to solve most of our problems, but we are lacking 
in sufficient soul power to stifle our selfishness. We believe that our 
problems can be solved only by recognizing that Jesus Christ is 
the Gospel of God. That Jesus came to reveal God to man, and that 
he shows to us man's spiritual nature and man's pricelessness. We 
believe that Jesus proclaims love as the fundamental principle of 
Christian living, and that if we have his love in our hearts, it will 
send us forth with a deeper understanding of, and a greater enthu- 
siasm for, the building of a finer society and a finer kind of world 
order. In the judgement of your committee we as North Carolina 
Baptists need to hear God's voice, repent of our sins, mend our 
ways, seek to understand and live and preach and teach the gospel 



of North Carolina 49 

of God, which is Christ Jesus. We therefore call upon our people 
to build their programs with a vital Christian spirit of faith. To give 
themselves without reservation to our Lord Jesus Christ, to follow 
him faithfully in our love of God, and to minister to all people in 
the spirit of Christian love and Christian brotherhood. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. M. Lee, Chairman 
R. A. Ellis 
Earl C. James 
M. L. Davis 
M. O. Owens, Jr. 
R. C. Foster 
Mrs. J. S. Farmer 
J. M. Duncan 
L. V. Coggins 

30. The Afternoon Session closed with a message from J. B. 
Weatherspoon, Louisville, Kentucky, who spoke to the Report on 
the general theme of "Christ Is the Answer in Human Relations." 

TUESDAY — Evening Session 

Session Theme: Christ Is The Answer In Our State 

31. Director of Music John D. Holmes again presented the Camp- 
bell College Choir and they sang "From Heaven Above." A solo by 
Miss Phyllis Stevenson, using the 23rd Psalm, with the male chorus 
of the choir singing "Sleep," followed. 

Song: "All Hail the Power of Jesus Name." 

32. The praise and prayer service was led by Lowell F. Sodeman, 
Clinton. 

33. Prior to the message brought by J. C. Canipe, Hendersonville, 
Secretary of Evangelism, on the theme, "Christ is the Answer in 
Evangelism," H. G. Hammett, Chairman of Committee on Evangel- 
ism, made the following report and upon his motion was adopted: 

REPORT ON EVANGELISM 

A great military conqueror has been quoted as having said, "Con- 
quest has made me what I am and conquest must maintain me." 
Likewise North Carolina Baptists, who have been made what they 
are by great evangelistic fervor, can well paraphrase these words 
to say "Evangelism has made us what we are and Evangelism must 
maintain us." 

Thus North Carolina Baptists need to build great evangelistic 
fires because: 

1. This is the way of New Testament Christianity. 

2. This is the example and command of the Lord Jesus. 



50 Baptist State Convention 

3. This is the urge of the hundreds of thousands of lost people 
in our State. (In almost every Association the reports coming 
in reveal far over half of the population without Christ.) 

4. This is the only way to unity of fellowship in Christ. Other- 
wise we will divide in groups, schools, and cliques without the 
great compulsion of Evangelism. 

The Committee on Evangelism, with a member in every Associa- 
tion, has been faithfully striving to stimulate evangelism in every 
part of the State. Evidences are that the evangelistic fires are 
burning brighter throughout the State. For this increased evange- 
listic fervor we wish to express gratitude to our God and to many 
people and groups. Among these are: 

1. The individual members of the Committee on Evangelism. 

2. The pastors of large and small churches. 

3. The program committees of the Convention and Association. 

4. The editor of the Biblical Recorder, Dr. L. L. Carpenter. The 
space given the committee and the Superintendent of Evangel- 
ism has been invaluable. 

5. The editor of Charity and Children, Dr. John A. McMillan. He 
has also given space and encouragement. 

6. The State leaders including M. A. Huggins, L. L. Morgan, 
Harvey T. Gibson, James W. Ray, Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Miss 
Ruth Provence, and Miss Mary Ayscue of the Baptist Book 
Store. 

7. And above all we want to thank God for our great Superin- 
tendent of Evangelism, the Reverend J. C. Canipe, whose con- 
secration, zeal, endurance, and compassion have done much to 
turn the forces of evil by building fires of evangelism. 

Recommendations 

1. That pastors and churches give special emphasis to the im- 
portant matter of winning the lost. Each church will do well to 
have yearly one or more series of revival meetings, and a com- 
mittee on evangelism, or a Soul-winning Band, for perennial evangel- 
ism and enlistment. Emphasis should be given evangelism in Vaca- 
tion Bible School, Sunday School, Training Union, and Woman's 
Missionary Work. 

2. That the District Association emphasize evangelism and elect 
a Chairman of Evangelism, preferably the same one from the Asso- 
ciation on the Convention's Committee on Evangelism. 

3. That the Baptist State Convention now in session go on record 
as in hearty accord with the Home Mission Board plans for a 
simultaneous crusade, March 25-April 8, 1951, for every church east 
of the Mississippi River. 

4. That the goals for baptism in our State be as follows: 1949, 
40,000; 1950, 60,000; 1951, 80,000. 



of North Carolina 51 

5. That a worthy place be made, and due emphasis given, to 
evangelism on every state and associational meeting, or conference 
of the Convention, of the Sunday School, Training Union, Woman's 
Missionary Union, and Brotherhood. 

6. That more publicity be given evangelism in the Biblical Re- 
corder, Charity and Children, church bulletins, and county papers. 

7. That associational conferences be planned by the Associational 
Chairman on Evangelism where and whenever possible. 

8. That attendance of pastors and laymen be urged on the state- 
wide conference on evangelism, led by the Reverend J. C. Canipe, 
March 14-16, 1949, at the First Baptist Church of Winston-Salem. 

9. That Simultaneous Associational Revivals be planned, as the 
Holy Spirit leads. 

10. That our Baptist colleges earnestly urge evangelism, and 
prepare teams of speakers and singers for use in every church and 
association where desired. Also in every Baptist college, courses 
in evangelism be provided for the students. 

11. That the State Convention Radio Committee, pastors, associ- 
ational leaders, and Associational Chairmen of Evangelism arrange 
series of radio programs where possible emphasizing evangelism. 

12. That the pastors and churches join with the Sunday School 
Board in teaching the Book of John, January 3-7, 1949. 

13. That associations and churches make carefully planned sur- 
veys to locate the lost. 

14. That all Baptist evangelists and singers send their names 
to Mr. M. A. Huggins to be listed in the office of the secretary, and 
in the Convention Annual. 

15. That all over the state Bible study and prayer groups be 
formed and encouraged to find God's will in His eternal word, and 
to pray earnestly and sincerely for conviction and Baptism of the 
Holy Spirit. 

34. The Meredith College Group of Nine under the direction of 
Miss Beatrice Donley sang: "At Eventide" with Miss Betty Comp- 
ton rendering the solo part. 

35. With E. Lowell Spivey, Charlotte, Field Secretary of the 
Convention, presiding, a most outstanding presentation of the State 
Missions program was presented. The program opened with Fon 
H. Scofield, Wake Forest, formerly Secretary of Visual Aid, Radio 
and Publicity of the Convention, who has only recently associated 
himself in similar work with the Foreign Mission Board, placing 
on the screen many outstanding State Mission projects, at the same 
time bringing inspirational readings bearing upon the statewide mis- 
sion program. The program closed as Field Secretary Spivey pre- 
sented two of his associates who are serving as field secretaries in 
other parts of the State; namely, Earle L. Bradley, Raleigh, and J. C. 
Pipes, Asheville. 

Song: "Rescue the Perishing." 



52 Baptist State Convention 

36. Duke K. McCall, Nashville, Executive Secretary of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Southern Baptist Convention, brought the 
closing message of the evening session from the subject, "Christ is 
The Answer in Stewardship" and after his prayer, the Convention 
adjourned. 

WEDNESDAY— Morning Session 

Session Theme: Christ Is The Answer In Our Education 

37. The morning session of the second day convened at 9:30 with 
Director of Music, John Holmes, leading in the singing of "Standing 
On The Promises" and "Pass Me Not." 

38. The service of praise and prayer was led by W. Isaac Terrell, 
Oxford. 

39. Wilson Woodcock, having on the date previous given notice, 
moved and the Convention approved an Amendment to Article IV, 
Section 3 of the Charter of the Biblical Recorder, Incorporated, to 
establish Monday after the Third Sunday in October as the date for 
the annual meeting of the Board of Directors. 

40. Charles A. Maddry, Wilmington, offered the following Reso- 
lution involving legalized pari-mutuel horse-race gambling in 
New Hanover County, which was upon his motion referred to the 
Committee on Resolutions: 

RESOLUTION ON LEGALIZED GAMBLING 

Whereas on November 2, 1948 an election was held in New 
Hanover County authorizing the appointment of a Racing Com- 
mission and legalized pari-mutuel horse-race gambling, and 

Whereas gambling is an unmitigated moral, spiritual, and eco- 
nomic evil, and 

Whereas the results of such legalized gambling are not local in 
character, and 

Whereas the contagion of legalized gambling, encouraged by the 
false hopes of local gain, will not cease in two counties, but its 
deception will spread to other counties, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved: 

1. That the Baptist State Convention express its disapproval 
of the legalization of gambling in any form. 

2. That we call upon the pastors and churches to use every 
influence possible to combat the coming of a new legalized evil 
to our State. 

3. That we call upon the members of the next North Carolina 
General Assembly to pass such legislation as may be needed to 
make gambling illegal in any form in every county in the State. 

41. Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson, presented in behalf of Louis S. 
Gaines, Chairman of the Special Committee of the General Board, 
the following report involving membership on the Boards with 
special reference to the Executive Committees, and upon his motion 
it was adopted. 



of North Carolina 53 

REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF THE GENERAL 

BOARD 

Inasmuch as the General Board and other boards of the Con- 
vention are authorized by the Convention to provide executive 
committees, and due to the fact that under the Constitution terms 
of officers of all boards end with the Convention, and inasmuch 
as many of the boards, including the General Board, do not meet 
until weeks or months after the Convention, it is recommended by 
the committee that the Convention direct the General Board, Boards 
of Trustees, and Boards of Directors of its institutions to exercise 
care in selecting members of their executive committees so that 
in so far as possible the executive committees be composed of an 
equal number from each of the four year groups. 

42. The fourth college group to offer special music appeared 
on the program at this time when the Mars Hill Chorus under the 
direction of Mrs. Grady Souther with Miss Lucille Sawyer accom- 
panying offered the selections: "Jesus, Our Lord, We Adore Thee," 
and "Let Us Walk in the Light of the Lord" with soloists Miss 
Martha Maxwell and Dean Minton taking the leading parts. 

43. "Christ Is The Answer In Our Seminaries" with J. Clyde 
Turner, Raleigh, presiding followed. 

44. Prior to the special message by J. B. Weatherspoon, Louisville, 
Kentucky, representing the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 
he introduced Wash Watts of New Orleans Seminary and W. L. 
Howse, Ft. Worth, Texas, of the Southwestern Seminary. 

45. James W. Ray, Raleigh, Secretary of the Division of Student 
Activities of the Convention, opened the discussion on "Christ is 
the Answer in our Baptist Student Union" after recognizing BSU 
representatives from various college campuses. He presented Miss 
Betsy Huggins, President of the Baptist Student Union on the 
campus of the University of North Carolina, who brought the 
message on the theme of the hour. 

46. With Vice-President F. Orion Mixon presiding, L. L. Morgan, 
Raleigh, Secretary of the Division of Sunday Schools, was recognized, 
who after presenting his associates introduced W. L. Howse, Fort 
Worth, Texas, who brought the message on "Christ is the Answer in 
Our Sunday Schools." 

47. Harvey T. Gibson, Raleigh, Secretary of the Division of Train- 
ing Union, introduced his associates and presented Jerry E. Lambdin, 
Nashville, Tennessee, who brought the message, "Christ is the An- 
swer in Our Training Union." 

48. Special recognition was given to the work of the Associational 
Missionaries who were invited to come forward at this time and be 
recognized. Of the fifty-one now serving the various associations in 
the State, practically every one was present. Continuing the subject 
of Associational Missions, G. W. Bullard, Raleigh, Superintendent of 



54 Baptist State Convention 

Associational Missions, was introduced and brought the message on 
"Christ is the Answer in Associational Missions." 
Song: "Stand Up for Jesus." 

49. The Mars Hill Chorus presented two numbers using "List 
the Cherubic Host," the solo parts being carried by Miss Barbara 
Morriss, Miss Gretchen Rufty, and William Stapleton; and, "Psalm 
150." 

50. A pause came in the Convention when R. Archie Ellis re- 
quested and the wife of the President of the Convention, Mrs. John 
W. Suttle, was asked to rise and be recognized. 

51. Three special messages followed in this order: 

Christ is the Answer in the Home — George W. Heaton, Char- 
lotte. 
Christ is the Answer in the Church — W. L. Howse, Fort 
Worth, Texas. 

Christ is the Answer in Our Colleges — Solon B. Cousins, Rich- 
mond, Va. 

52. This session closed with prayer offered by C. Sylvester Green, 
Durham. 

WEDNESDAY— Afternoon Session 

53. This afternoon session convened at 2:30 with Director of 
Music, John D. Holmes, leading in the singing of "How Firm a 
Foundation" with Mrs. Samuel Payne, pianist of the host church, 
assisting. 

54. W. P. Biggerstaff, Shelby, led in the praise and prayer service. 

55. During the next hour special emphasis was placed upon the 
report of the Council on Christian Education. The Chairman of the 
Council, C. Sylvester Green, presided and appearing on the platform 
were President Thurman Kitchin of Wake Forest, President Carlyle 
Campbell of Meredith, President Leslie Campbell of Campbell, 
President Phil Elliott of Gardner- Webb, President Hoyt Blackwell 
of Mars Hill, and President C. C. Burris of Wingate. 

Attention was called by the Chairman of the Council to the faith- 
ful service of the Executive Secretary, Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh, 
and the work of the Council as revealed by the report of the Council 
on Christian Education appearing at section 134, on page 137, of 
the report of the General Board. 

56. The Chairman of the Council on Christian Education pointed 
out that the Council had recommended and followed certain stan- 
dards that had been considered wise and essential for the admission 
of schools as members of the Baptist group of colleges in North 
Carolina. He then recognized President Phil Elliott of Gardner- 
Webb College, who made the following report bearing on this sub- 
ject with reference to the admission of Gardner- Webb College into 
the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. 



of North Carolina 55 

REPORT OF GARDNER-WEBB COLLEGE TO THE 1948 BAPTIST 
STATE CONVENTION ON THE EXPANSION CAMPAIGN 

According to the records of the Council on Christian Education, 
Gardner-Webb College was asked as a prerequisite to becoming a 
member of the Baptist family of colleges to raise by the time of this 
convention one-quarter of a million dollars for endowment, in addi- 
tion to three-quarters of a million dollars to be spent on the college 
plant. I am authorized to announce that by a margin the college has 
exceeded both requirements. All college assets are listed at cost. 
Gardner-Webb, therefore, asks for full recognition as a member 
institution of this convention. 

P. L. Elliott, President. 

57. The presiding officer recognized Mr. Leon Spencer of the 
Chowan Association who spoke briefly on the effort to renovate and 
restore Chowan College. 

58. At the conclusion of the presentation of the work of the 
Council on Christian Education, attention was called to the fact that 
Chairman Green was completing with this convention his term as a 
member of the Council and because of his interest and faithful 
service, the convention by vote expressed to him its appreciation 
for his work. 

59. During the next hour special emphasis was given to reports 
on the enlargement program of Wake Forest College. Casper C. 
Warren, Charlotte, presided and called upon Thane McDonald, 
Director of Music at Wake Forest College to lead the Wake Forest 
A Capella Choir in the singing of "Beautiful Saviour" and "The 
Creation." Chairman Warren followed and asked the choir and the 
audience to join together in the singing of "Dear Old Wake Forest." 

A discussion of the enlargement program followed and attention 
was directed to several reports relating to the enlargement program 
appearing in the advanced report of the General Board beginning 
with section 142, page 148, following. 

President Thurman Kitchin of Wake Forest spoke to the report 
and following a discussion led by Casper C. Warren on the various 
phases of the enlargement program, his motion for the adoption of 
the reports was approved. 

Irving Carlyle, Winston-Salem, President of the Wake Forest 
Board of Trustees, reviewed the action of the Convention in accept- 
ing the Smith-Reynolds Foundation gift and previous support given 
to the removal of Wake Forest to Winston-Salem and challenged 
the Convention and North Carolina Baptists to move forward in 
this great enterprise in behalf of Christian Education. 

Horace Easom, Director of the Convention's program for Wake 
Forest College, addressed the Convention on the Convention's 
special effort and presented the following report and urged every 
Baptist Church in North Carolina to join in this challenging under- 
taking : 



56 Baptist State Convention 

THE CONVENTION'S PROGRAM FOR WAKE FOREST COLLEGE 

At the end of each quarter a report is published in The Biblical 
Recorder, showing new Associations, new Churches with amounts 
underwritten and bringing the total amount underwritten, cash 
paid in and expenses to date. The next report will appear about 
the second week in January. 

Sometime during the coming year, an overall report showing 
all Associations, Churches, amounts underwritten, cash paid in by 
each, and expenses to date, will be published in one folder and 
mailed to all Churches in the State Convention. 

The Convention's Program for Wake Forest College to raise one 
and one-half million dollars through the Churches for the reloca- 
tion and enlargement began on June 1, 1947, and has been going 
on for 535 days to-night. 

Total number of Associations in which Churches have under- 
written definite amounts 63 

Total number of Churches which have underwritten amounts.... 702 

Total amount underwritten by these 702 Churches $1,512,785.78 

Total amount of cash paid in to date. 233,469.65 

Total amount of expenses to date 34,882.93 

I found almost all Churches in a building program, anticipating a 
building program for a Church auditorium, educational building or 
parsonage, program of renovation, paying off a debt, or in the 
process of changing pastors. For these reasons it has taken most of 
them several months to begin sending in cash for this program 
to Mr. Huggins. The money is beginning to move now at the rate 
of approximately $25,000.00 per month. I think we will get the one 
and one-half million dollars in cash in the next five years unless our 
economic system suffers some very bad reverses. I believe almost 
all of the Churches will pay the amounts they have underwritten. 

I am led to believe from my contacts over the State that almost 
every Church in the Baptist State Convention will want to have a 
part in this our supreme opportunity for Christian Education. A 
very cordial and warm welcome has been extended to me every- 
where I have gone. 

In closing the discussion of the Wake Forest Enlargement Pro- 
gram Casper C. Warren introduced John L. Erwin of the American 
City Bureau, which organization has been selected by the Wake 
Forest College trustees to carry forward the special effort in 
behalf of the trustees in the securing of additional funds in keeping 
with the action of the Convention. 

At this point in the presentation of the enlargement program Ralph 
A. Herring led in a special prayer in the interest of Christian 
Education. 

60. A report was received from the "Committee of Fifteen" 
named by this Convention through Ralph A. Herring concerning 
the disposition of the Wake Forest College property. His motion 



of North Carolina 57 

included in the following statement was favorably approved by the 
Convention and the "Committee of Fifteen" was requested to con- 
tinue to serve. 

COMMITTEE OF FIFTEEN 

The Committee of Fifteen met on Monday night, October 15, 
1948, to consider whether any further action on the part of the 
Convention might be wisely taken following its decision last year 
to offer the property at Wake Forest to the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention as a site for a future seminary. 

After considerable discussion it was unanimously agreed to pre- 
sent the following recommendation: 

That this committee be continued, or a similar one be ap- 
pointed; and that, while negotiations be continued with the 
Southern Convention, the committee be authorized to explore 
the whole field of an advance program in Christian education 
in North Carolina to discover the wisest plan into which the 
present Wake Forest campus may fit. 

It was further moved: 

That the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina express to 
the Southern Baptist Convention its urgent desire that a seminary 
be located in this area of the Southern Convention, and that if the 
site offered at Wake Forest should not prove feasible this Con- 
vention, in view of its strategic position, unanimously and heartily 
invites the location of such a seminary at any place in North Caro- 
lina that may seem desirable. 

61. As provided in the Constitution the next Order of Business 
was the election of convention officers. 

The following nominations were received for President: O. R. 
Mangum, Lenoir, nominated Thomas P. Pruitt, Hickory; H. G. Ham- 
mett, Durham, nominated F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh; E. N. Teague, 
Fayetteville, nominated Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville. 

Upon a standing vote F. Orion Mixon was elected as President of 
the Convention for 1949. 

62. Without additional nominations Thomas P. Pruitt was elected 
First Vice-President upon the motion of M. O. Owens, Jr., Marion; 
Louis S. Gaines was nominated by L. J. Rainey, Trinity, Second 
Vice-President; W. Perry Crouch, Asheville, was elected Third Vice- 
President upon the motion of Horace Easom, Shelby. 

63. Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, was re-elected as Recording 
Secretary upon the motion of W. H. Moore, Winston-Salem. 

64. Maloy A. Huggins, Raleigh, was re-elected General Sec- 
retary and Treasurer upon the motion of William Harrison Williams. 

65. L. L. Morgan, Raleigh, was re-elected Statistical Secretary 
upon the motion of Nane Starnes, Asheville. 



58 Baptist State Convention 

66. Upon the motion of William Harrison Williams, Chairman, 
R. L. McMillan, Raleigh; P. H. Wilson, Raleigh and F. H. Brooks, 
Smithfield were elected trustees of the Convention. 

67. A report was received from the Committee on Place and 
Preacher and upon motion by Lucius C. Pinnix, Kings Mountain, 
Chairman, the Convention approved the Committee recommenda- 
tion that the 1949 Convention be held with the Tabernacle Church, 
Raleigh, as host and that Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City, be asked 
to preach the Convention sermon and that J. Glenn Blackburn, 
Wake Forest, serve as alternate. 

68. The time having expired for the period allotted for the 
bringing of the report on the North Carolina Baptist Hospital, 
it was agreed upon motion by W. K. McGee, Winston-Salem, that 
the Committee on Order of Business arrange suitable time for the 
bringing of the Hospital Report on tomorrow and this motion was 
accepted. 

69. The closing message of the afternoon was brought by J. M. 
Dawson, Washington, D. C, his subject being "Christ is the Answer 
in Our Citizenship." 

70. The Wednesday afternoon session adjourned following prayer 
by Zeno Wall, Thomasville. 

WEDNESDAY — Evening Session 

71. Upon the convening of this session the audience sang several 
hymns including "Higher Ground," "We'll Work Till Jesus Comes" 
and "There Is a Fountain." 

72. Jack R. Bagwell, Asheville, led in the praise and prayer 
service. 

73. The Committee on Enrollment reported that 1,408 messengers 
had registered and 529 visitors. 

74. Ike G. Greer, Chapel Hill, presented the following report 
of the Committee to Secure Student Center Property at Chapel 
Hill, which was received as a matter of information: 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO SECURE STUDENT CENTER 
PROPERTY AT CHAPEL HILL 

In the absence of the chairman of this committee, Grover H. 
Jones, I have been asked to make a report for the committee. 

On page 5 of the Advanced Report of the General Board you will 
find a statement of the action of the Board concerning the purchase 
of the Roberson property in Chapel Hill to be used as a Student 
Center. 

The movement to purchase this property to be used as a Student 
Center began with the calling together of a few Baptist alumni 
and friends of the University in October 1947. As a result of their 



of North Carolina 59 

request to the Convention, this committee was appointed by the 
1947 Convention. 

The committee secured an option on what is known as the Rober- 
son property and subsequently authorized a quiet campaign among 
Baptist alumni and friends to raise the money necessary for the 
purchase of this property. 

Just prior to the expiration of the option it was found that only 
about $7,000 was in hand. Inasmuch as the committee felt that 
this was by far the most desirable property available, or to be 
available, it was thought wise to exercise the option and ask the 
General Board to purchase the property. As the committee and 
General Board tried to find some way to handle this matter, since 
there was not sufficient money in sight for the purchase, a generous 
Baptist deacon, a former student of the University, agreed to lend 
the necessary amount at 3 per cent interest, same to be paid on or 
before November 30, 1949. 

Even thought our committee is conscious of the fact that many 
demands are being made upon the Baptists of the State, all of 
which are worthy, we feel that we must take advantage of this 
opportunity to enrich the spiritual lives of the more than two 
thousand Baptist students now attending the Universiy and other 
thousands who will attend in the years to come. 

It is the plan of the committee to go forward with its efforts to 
raise the funds to take care of this purchase price just as rapidly 
as possible. 

75. Claude U. Broach, Charlotte, presented a statement in the 
interest of the displaced persons now detained in European DP 
camps. His statement was in the form of a motion that the Com- 
mittee on Resolutions be requested to prepare a statement of policy 
in the interest of displaced persons by this Convention. This matter 
was automatically referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 

76. I, Stuart McElroy, representing the American Bible Society, 
Philadelphia, brought his usual splendid report on the work of this 
great organization. 

77. T. Sloane Guy, Jr., Wadesboro, presented the following 
Resolution which was referred to the Committee on Resolutions: 

A Resolution: That the Baptist State Convention of North Caro- 
lina request the General Board to explore the field and determine 
the feasibility of establishing means of implementing the Conven- 
tion's pronouncements on Labor-Management Relations; this report 
to be presented to the next session of the Convention with recom- 
mendations. 

78. Julian S. Hopkins, High Point, presided during the discus- 
sion of the report from the Sunday School Board and the message 
of the hour was delivered by Jerry E. Lambdin, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. 



60 Baptist State Convention 

79. F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh, reporting for the Committee un 
Order of Business, stated that the Hospital report carried over 
from the Tuesday Afternoon session would be presented as the 
first item on Thursday morning. 

80. Under the direction of Robert Rodwell, organist, along with 
the choir of the host church, the "Hallelujah Chorus" was presented. 

81. The work of the Woman's Missionary Union was the special 
order that followed presided over by Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh, 
President of the North Carolina Baptist Woman's Missionary 
Union. Mrs. Farmer directed attention to the Report of the Woman's 
Missionary Union which follows and upon her motion to adopt, 
she was recognized and introduced Mrs. G. R. Martin, Norfolk, 
Virginia, who brought the message and thereafter the report was 
adopted. 

Report of Woman's Missionary Union 
Auxiliary to Baptist State Convention of North Carolina 

With "hearts replete with thanksgiving" we come to report to 
you, whose helpers we are, something of our progress since the 
last meeting of the Baptist State Convention. 

The Lord has richly blessed us as we have served Him through 
Woman's Missionary Union. The report for 1947 showed 4,580 
organizations with 87,190 members, who gave for the spread of 
the gospel at home and abroad $779,504.06. The reports for the 
first three quarters of 1948 tell us that $538,079.28 has been given. 

Except for the cancelling of two Intermediate Girls' Auxiliary 
Camps at Seaside due to circumstances entirely beyond our control, 
all the usual meetings have been held, with splendid attendance 
and with excellent programs. The annual meeting in Greensboro 
featured our Commemoration Year goals. Attendance was record 
breaking and Greensboro hospitality was equal to every need. 

The Fruitland Assembly grounds had been enthusiastically tried 
last year, and we went back this summer with eager anticipation 
of what we already knew; we turned our faces to Seaside with a 
bit of curiosity to know if all we had heard could be true. We found 
that the half had not been told, and the camp weeks were gratifying 
in many ways. In connection with our two W.M.S. Camps this year, 
we launched week-end camps for B.W.C. and Y.W.A. members. 

The associational and divisional meetings fully measured up to 
the fondest hopes of the state officers. We are deeply grateful to 
the devoted women who give their services wholeheartedly and 
efficiently in the leadership of these phases of our work. The di- 
visional meetings are growing so rapidly in attendance and in the 
high quality of the programs that they are like young conventions. 

Mrs. M. A. Huggins tendered her resignation as State Stewardship 
Chairman at the last annual meeting. It was accepted with re- 
luctance, for her service has been outstanding. Mrs. J. Ben Eller, 
of Greensboro, was elected to succeed her. 

Miss Laura Frances Snow, who did summer field work with fine 
results while in college and the W.M.U. Training School, came in 



of North Carolina 61 

June as a second Field Representative. That work has grown to 
such an extent that Mrs. Wacaster, energetic and efficient as she is, 
cannot fill all the requests that come. Miss Snow, already familiar 
with our organization, was ready to begin work immediately, and 
she is making for herself a large place in Woman's Missionary 
Union. 

Mrs. David F. Boyd, of Charlotte, has recently found it necessary 
to resign as W.M.U. Training School Trustee, since she is moving 
to Georgia. Mrs. Boyd has been exceptionally fine in the responsi- 
bilities of this position, and we regret losing her from our state. 

Miss Josephine Wood, Office Stenographer, resigned to enter 
Campbell College; Miss Evelyn Dupree came in September as her 
successor. 

The only other change in personnel is in the status of Mr. B. W. 
Jackson from a bachelor to a benedict. He and Miss Ruth Eller, 
who graduated from Meredith College last May, were married in 
September and are living in Angier, where Mrs. Jackson teaches 
Bible in the public schools. 

The North Carolina Union is wholeheartedly in sympathy with 
the Advance Program of the Foreign Mission Board, and we antici- 
pate the largest Lottie Moon Christmas Offering we have ever had. 

We are grateful to Mr. Huggins for his unceasing and hearty co- 
operation in our work; for all he and the General Board do for us. 
We are grateful for the privilege of being "laborers together" with 
the Convention as we all work and pray and give that the day may 
soon come when "at the name of Jesus every knee shall bow." 

We realize increasingly what a glorious privilege it is to "serve 
the Lord Christ" who is the answer for every need of this weary 
world. 

Foy J. Farmer, President, 

Ruth Provence, Executive Secretary. 

82. The program of World Missions was the topic that followed 
with Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem, presiding. He first recog- 
nized Eugene Howard, New Orleans, Louisiana, who discussed the 
Southern Baptist Relief Program. 

In connection with the subject of World Relief, W. P. Biggerstaff, 
Shelby, presented the following Resolution on World Relief which 
was referred to the Committee on Resolutions: 

RESOLUTION: World Relief. 

Whereas, the need is still very acute with reference to World 
Relief both as to material and money, and 

Whereas, the Southern Baptist Convention has a relief agency 
in New Orleans, and in view of the fact that North Carolina Bap- 
tists have no coordinated method of working with the Southern 
Baptist Convention relief center: 

Be It Resolved, that this Convention in session appoint a state- 
wide committee to cooperate with the relief center in New Orleans 



62 Baptist State Convention 

and lead our people to help meet this great need, and to take ad- 
vantage of the opportunity to minister in the name of Christ. 
Song: "Jesus Shall Reign." 

83. Following a prayer by R. Knolan Benfield, Hickory, the Wake 
Forest A Cappella Choir under the direction of Thane McDonald 
offered selections including the "Lord's Prayer" and a special rendi- 
tion of "Onward Christian Soldiers." 

84. The closing message of the evening on the subject of World 
Missions was brought by John Abernathy, Missionary to China. 

85. The evening session closed with prayer by J. Clyde Turner, 
Raleigh. 

THURSDAY— Morning Session 

86. The closing session of the Convention convened at 9:30 with 
the singing of "Holy Ghost, with Light Divine." 

87. The praise and prayer service was lead by W. P. Milne, 
Aulander. 

88. In keeping with the changed Order of Business W. K. McQee 
representing the Baptist Hospital spoke to the Report appearing 
at Section 147, Page 159 of the Advanced Report of the General 
Board and he was followed by William Harrison Williams, Char- 
lotte, and W. J. Stephenson, Wilmington. 

89. Charles B. Deane, Rockingham, presented on behalf of R. L. 
McMillan, Raleigh, Secretary, the following report of the Trustees 
of the Baptist State Convention: 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE BAPTIST STATE 
CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 

The trustees of the Convention, as elected by the 1947 session 
of the Convention, are F. H. Brooks, P. H. Wilson, and R. L. Mc- 
Millan. F. H. Brooks is Chairman, and R. L. McMillan is Secretary. 

During the year the following actions were taken: 

1. Took title to the property at 304 North Tryon Street, Char- 
lotte, North Carolina, the purchase of the property having been 
authorized by the Convention in its 1947 meeting. 

Covering the purchase two notes were given by the trustees, one 
in the amount of $60,000 secured by first mortgage on the property, 
and the other, in the amount of $35,000, an open note. 

2. Deed to a church lot in West Thomasville was transferred to 
the trustees of the Greenwood Baptist Church. 

3. Voted to transfer the property held in Sunset Park, Wilmington, 
to the trustees of the Sunset Park Church. 

4. Took title to property in Greenville, North Carolina, known 
as the Ward property, to be used as a Student Center for East Caro- 









of North Carolina ' 63 



lina Teachers College, giving a mortgage deed of trust on the prop- 
erty covering a note in the amount of $18,000 for the purchase 
price. 

5. Took title to property at Fort Fisher, North Carolina, adjacent 
to the leased property known as Seaside Baptist Assembly. 

6. Took title to the Roberson property, 107 South Columbia 
Street, Chapel Hill, to be used for a Student Center. A mortgage 
deed of trust in the amount of $30,000.00 was executed and a note 
for that amount given. 

7. Title to lot at Holly Ridge was transferred to the trustees of the 
Providence Church. 

8. Acting upon the request of the Wachovia Bank and Trust Com- 
pany the trustees voted to ask the bank to release the $214.98 being 
held in the Trust Department of the bank for payment of coupons on 
bonds, and further voted to issue a statement guaranteeing pay- 
ment to the bank in the event coupons should ever be presented 
for payment. 

9. The Convention requires bonds of certain officers and em- 
ployees. Upon examination it was found that a blanket bond is 
carried on all employees handling monies, including those in the 
Woman's Missionary Union and the Baptist Book Store in the 
amount of $10,000 for each employee, with an extra coverage of 
$15,000 for the treasurer, making a total of $25,000 for that 
officer. 

R. L. McMillan, Secretary. 

90. Claude U. Broach, Chairman of the Committee to report on 
the General Board's Report and with special reference to the 
recommendations which appear within the Advanced Report of the 
General Board, beginning at Section 150, Page 163, made the 
following report and upon his motion it was adopted: 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REPORT ON THE GENERAL 
BOARD'S REPORT 

Your committee, represented by eighteen of the twenty-three 
members, met and gave full consideration to the report of the 
General Board. The committee had able assistance from our Gen- 
eral Secretary, Mr. M. A. Huggins, who gave additional insight 
into matters contained in the report. Also present and participating 
helpfully were Clyde E. Baucom, President of the General Board, 
W. K. McGee, of our Baptist Hospital, and C. C. Warren. 

Approval was given to the report in full, and all recommendations 
were considered item by item, and endorsed with alterations and 
clarifications in three items as listed in the Advance Report on 
pages 73 and 74. These alterations are as follows: 

Item 6: That the amount specified, $7,500, be changed to $8,500. 

Item 8: The following should be added to the recommendation, 
and that the "General Board be given authority to accept any gifts of 
property or money for this project." 



64 Baptist State Convention 

Item 9: Your committee wishes to substitute the following 
recommendation : 

It is recommended that the chapel building which the Con- 
vention started at Wake Forest College be completed, or made 
serviceable, and that the General Board be empowered to take 
the amount necessary to do this out of the State's part of the 
Cooperative Program receipts before any division of funds is 
made, and extend this over a two year period if necessary. 

There are two additions to the recommendations as printed in 
the Advance Report. These were approved by the committee as 
follows : 

12. Inasmuch as the General Board and other boards of the Con- 
vention are authorized by the Convention to provide executive com- 
mittees, and due to the fact that under the Constitution terms of 
officers of all boards end with the Convention, and inasmuch as 
many of the boards, including the General Board, do not meet until 
weeks or months after the Convention, it is recommended by the 
committee that the Convention direct the General Board, Boards of 
Trustees, and Boards of Directors of its institutions to exercise care 
in selecting members of their executive committees so that in so far 
as possible the executive committees be composed of an equal 
number from each of the four year groups. 

13. We approve the recommendation of the Directors of the 
Biblical Recorder as given on page 86 of the Advance Report. 

Your committee wishes to give hearty endorsement to the work 
of the General Board since the Convention's meeting last year. 
Members of the committee present were: 

Claude U. Broach, Chairman 

S. F. Hudson 

H. H. Stembridge 

Ernest Glass 

C. M. Warren 

R. N. Carroll 

J. Clyde Turner 

Mrs. W. W. Jones 

W. A. Elam 

E. F. Baker 

Mrs. J. R. Everett 

R. K. Benfield 

J. Clyde Yates 

R. A. Cadle 

W. G. Russell 

C. D. Bain 

Mrs. G. Carl Lewis 

Mrs. D. H. Craver 



of North Carolina 65 

91. F. Orion Mixon discussed briefly the effort that was being 
made by the General Board to arrive at a correct decision on the 
question of securing a home for the aged. It is generally known 
that General Secretary Huggins working with members of the 
General Board has been seeking all the information possible on the 
correct procedure to follow in the establishment of such a home. 
By common consent the matter continues to be the subject of effort 
on the part of the General Board. 

92. The Report of the Committee to Nominate Members of the 
General Board, Trustees and Directors of Institutions and Agencies 
of the Baptist State Convention was presented by Ralph A. Herring, 
Winston-Salem, Chairman, and upon his motion, the report was 
adopted subject to a motion by F. Orion Mixon, Raleigh, that any 
duplications or vacancies not included in the report be filled by 
the respective Boards and Institutions. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE TO NOMINATE MEMBERS OF 

GENERAL BOARD, TRUSTEES AND DIRECTORS OF 

INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES OF THE BAPTIST 

STATE CONVENTION OF N. C. 

Members of General Board 

Term Expiring 1949: H. H. Stembridge, Forest City for O. M. 
Seigler. 

Term Expiring 1951: R. C. Foster, Whiteville, for George Watkins. 

Term Expiring 1952: Carlton S. Prickett, Burlington; *Everette 
White, Franklin; Hubert M. Craig, Lincolnton; *Mrs. E. B. Beasley, 
Fountain; W. C. Lucas, Asheboro; E. W. Holmes, Farmville; John 
H. Knight, Durham; W. C. Downing, Fayetteville; W. M. Morgan, 
Angier; W. G. Bond, Boone; L. Grady Burgess, Jacksonville; Worth 
C. Grant, Weldon. 

Directors of Baptist Foundation 

Term Expiring 1953: Swade Barbour, Clayton; F. L. Paschal, 
Greensboro; Robert Holleman, Durham. 

Trustees of the Baptist Hospital 

Term Expiring 1952: E. F. Sullivan, Hickory; W. J. Stephenson, 
Wilmington; John R. Knott, Charlotte; H. C. Warrick, Greensboro; 
Johnson J. Hayes, Wilkesboro; Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Raleigh. 

Trustees of the Baptist Orphanage of North Carolina 

Term Expiring 1952: I. G. Greer, Chapel Hill; J. B. Willis, Ham- 
let; W. E. Stanley, Durham; J. E. Conrad, Winston-Salem. 



*The General Board in the January 1949 annual meeting elected these mem- 
bers to serve in place of A. J. Hutchins, Canton, and Edwin F. Perry, Rocking- 
ham. 



66 Baptist State Convention 

Directors of Biblical Recorder 

Term Expiring 1950: Tom M. Freeman, Burlington for Carey Dowd. 

Term Expiring 1952: Louis S. Gaines, Fayetteville; T. W. Brewer, 

Raleigh; T. S. Lawrence, Cliffside; Charles B. McConnell, Cullowhee. 

Trustees of Campbell College 

Term Expiring 1950: Elmer L. Hedgepeth, Fairmont for W. W. 
Hutchins. 

Term Expiring 1952: LeRoy Martin, Raleigh; Spurgeon Boyce, 
Durham; R. W. Boling, Fayetteville; Willis E. Kivett, Southern 
Pines; Charlie Andrews, Chalybeate Springs. 

Trustees of Chowan College 

Term Expiring 1952: Lonnie Sasser, Murfreesboro; Mrs. Gordon 
Pruden, Severn; W. D. Morris, Scotland Neck, Jarvis Teague, Sea- 
board; Raynor Woodard, Conway; Marion Revelle, Conway; E. B. 
Lassiter, Potecasi; W. H. Evans, Harrelsville. 

Trustees of Gardner-Webb College 

Term Expiring 1952: Mrs. Rush Stroup, Shelby; J. Herbert 
Bridges, Charlotte; R. S. Dickson, Charlotte; W. W. Harris, Shelby; 
Mrs. Yates Spake, Morganton; C. D. Forney, Lawndale. 

Trustees of Mars Hill College 

Term Expiring 1952: Clyde Jarrett, Andrews; Grady B. Yelton, 
Rutherfordton; Myron Gordon, Marion; W. F. Woodall, Lenoir; C. C. 
Holland, Statesville; J. B. Ellen, Greensboro. 

Trustees of Meredith College 

Term Expiring 1949: W. H. Plemmons, Chapel Hill, for Carl G. 
McGraw. 

Term Expiring 1951: Mrs. J. Winston Pearce, Durham. 

Term Expiring 1952: Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton; J. B. Turner, 
Laurinburg; H. B. Anderson, Durham; J. D. Wilkins, Greensboro; 
H. W. Rowland, Wilmington; Claude U. Broach, Charlotte. 

Trustees of Wake Forest College 
Term Expiring 1951: M. L. Banister, Oxford, for W. D. Poe. 
Term Expiring 1952: C. E. Baucom, Wilson; B. E. Morris, Dur- 
ham; R. K. Benfield, Hickory; Claude B. Bowen, Greensboro; E. L. 
Davis, Winston-Salem; Carl V. Tyner, Leaksville; A. B. Wood, 
Charlotte; Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro; Hubert E. Olive, Lexing- 
ton; H. L. Bridges, Raleigh. 

Members of Council on Christian Education 

Term Expiring 1952: B. M. Watkins, Durham; William A. Poole, 
Burgaw. 



of North Carolina 67 

93. The Committee on Publicity made its report through L. L. 
Carpenter and upon his motion was adopted as follows: 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICITY 

The Committee on Publicity wishes to express appreciation to 
various persons and agencies for help and courtesies extended dur- 
ing the sessions of this Convention. 

First of all, we wish to thank Pastor C. C. Warren and Educa- 
tional Director J. M. Crowe and other members of the staff of the 
First Church of Charlotte for assistance rendered by way of provid- 
ing equipment and office space for our publicity work. 

We are grateful to the Charlotte papers for the large space and 
the good displays given to the news of the Convention, and also 
to the Greensboro Daily News which has had a member of its staff 
on the floor of the Convention reporting our meetings. Both the 
Associated Press and the United Press have cooperated with us and 
have helped greatly in sending out news. Among those who have 
been on the floor reporting our activities are: Granberry Dixon of 
the Charlotte Observer, Mack Bell of the Charlotte News, and 
Robert F. Farley, managing editor of the Greensboro Daily News. 

Miss Kate Matthews, editorial secretary of the Biblical Recorder, 
and Mrs. Harvie P. Curlee, Jr., office secretary of the State Sunday 
School Department, have been employed by the Committee on 
Publicity to help in reporting the news and in getting it out to the 
various papers. We want to commend these two for the excellent 
work which they have done. 

We are grateful to L. J. Morriss, chairman of the Radio Committee 
of the Convention, and his assistant, Mrs. Marian Bridges, for their 
work in reporting the activities of the Convention to the radio 
stations of the city and to the Dixie FM network. Radio station 
WIST, here in Charlotte, which originates the broadcasts for the 
Dixie FM network — state-wide — including Charlotte, Statesville, 
Winston-Salem, High Point, Salisbury, Greensboro, Raleigh, Golds- 
boro, and Rocky Mount, and Radio Station WAYS, of Charlotte, 
have been generous in granting time for broadcasts over their sta- 
tions. 

We appreciate the work of the following photographers in furn- 
ishing pictures for the papers: Don Martin of the Charlotte News, 
Duke Sanchez of Duke Photo Studio, and Jake Houston of the 
Charlotte Observer. 

We regret that we have lost to the Foreign Mission Board the 
services of Fon H. Schofield, Jr., who formerly gave part of his 
time as secretary of publicity for the Baptist State Convention, but 
we express appreciation for the good work he has done along this 
line in the last year or two and we hope that our Convention will 
hold to the policy of maintaining a secretary of publicity, at least 
on a part-time basis, who will work at this important matter of 
public relations throughout the year. 



68 Baptist State Convention 

94. Upon motion by M. A. Huggins, the report of the Historical 
Commission appearing in the advanced report of the General Board, 
at Section 144, Page 155, was approved. 

95. W. E. Goode, Scotland Neck, read the report of the Baptist 
Foundation, Section 145, Page 155, and upon his motion, the report 
was approved. 

96. Robert L. Humber, Chairman of the Committee on Resolutions, 
submitted the following report and as each subject was presented, 
it was approved upon the motion by Chairman Humber: 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS 

1. Resolution in Support of the American Bible Society. 

Whereas this Convention recognizes that the American Bible 
Society renders an essential service to all forms of mission work 
throughout the world by aiding in Bible translation, publishing the 
Scriptures without note or comment, and distributing them without 
profit and usually below cost, and 

Whereas in addition to its regular work the Society is also supply- 
ing without charge millions of volumes of the Word of God for 
needy people who have been cut off from the Scriptures because of 
world conditions, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved 

First, that we thankfully record the growing number of churches 
supporting this work and earnestly request all of our churches and 
our people to make contributions to the work of the American 
Bible Society, all such contributions to be sent through the regular 
channels to the Baptist State Headquarters designated for the 
American Bible Society. 

Second, that we again approve a special offering for this work 
to be promoted through the office of the General Secretary, and to 
be taken on a day suggested by him, or at such other time as may 
be more appropriate for the local churches. 

2. Resolution re Labor-Management 

Whereas the Baptist State Convention has made certain pro- 
nouncements on the question of Labor-Management Relations, and 

Whereas the Church seeks to understand and harmonize the 
relationship between Labor and Management on Christian principles, 
Now Therefore, Be It Resolved that this Convention request its 
General Board to investigate and determine the possibility of 
practical action in this field, with recommendations to the next 
session of the Convention. 

3. In re World Relief 

Whereas the need is still very acute with reference to World 
relief, both as to material and money, and 



of North Carolina 69 

Whereas the Southern Baptist Convention has a relief agency in 
New Orleans, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved that the churches of this Convention 
be encouraged to utilize the channels for World Relief which have 
been established in New Orleans by the Southern Baptist Conven- 
tion. 

4. In re Displaced Persons 

Whereas there are many Baptist people now detained in Displaced 
Persons Camps in Europe, and 

Whereas official government assistance is available, along with 
assistance by The Baptist World Alliance, and 

Whereas our Christian responsibility includes concern for these 
unfortunate victims of war, 

*Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved that the President of this Conven- 
tion be authorized to appoint a special committee to explore this 
subject and to publicize this matter through the Biblical Recorder. 

5. Resolution on Legalized Gambling 

Whereas in the summer of 1948, pari-mutuel gambling on dog 
racing was begun in Carteret County, and 

Whereas on November 2, 1948, an election was held in New 
Hanover County authorizing the appointment of a Racing Commis- 
sion and legalized pari-mutuel horse-race gambling, and 

Whereas gambling is an unmitigated moral, spiritual, and eco- 
nomic evil, and 

Whereas the results of such legalized gambling are not local in 
character, and 

Whereas the contagion of legalized gambling, encouraged by the 
false hopes of local gain, will not restrict itself to two counties, but 
its deception will spread to other counties of this State, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved 

1. That the Baptist State Convention express its disapproval of 
the legalization of gambling in any form. 

2. That we call upon the pastors and churches to use every 
influence possible to combat the coming of a new legalized evil to 
our State. 

3. That we call upon the members of the next North Carolina 
General Assembly to pass such legislation as may be needed to 
make gambling in any form illegal in every county in the State, 
and instruct the General Secretary to convey to each member of 
the General Assembly knowledge of this action by this Convention. 

6. APPRECIATION 

That the Baptist State Convention desires to express its sincere 
appreciation to all persons and organizations which have so gen- 
erously and effectively collaborated in making possible this Con- 



* Committees named being: Claud U. Broach, Chairman, Charlotte; Robert L. 
Humber, Greenville; Mayes Behrman, Charlotte; E. McNeill Poteat, Raleigh. 



70 Baptist State Convention 

vention, particularly the officers of this Convention, the First Bap- 
tist Church of Charlotte, its host, the other churches and ministers 
of the Mecklenburg Association, the citizens of Charlotte in opening 
their homes and extending hospitality to the messengers, the regis- 
trars, ushers and pages, as well as the members of the numerous 
committees who have served the Convention so tirelessly, the 
choral groups, and the local and visiting musicians who have 
furnished such excellent music on the various occasions, the news- 
papers and radios which have so fully reported the proceedings of 
this Convention, the public officials of Charlotte, including the 
members of the traffic department, and the hotels of the City 
which have provided accommodations to members of this body and 
their friends. 

97. J. B. Dailey, Jackson, secured recognition and requested that 
the Convention go on record concerning World Relief and offered 
the following motion, which was approved: 

A Motion — World Relief : I move that this Convention recommend 
to our churches a special week's effort, February 6-13, 1949, for 
the collection of needed relief items, and contributions from the 
Sunday Schools on the basis of ten cents per pupil, to be distributed 
through the Southern Baptist Relief Center in New Orleans, and 
that the Brotherhood, B.S.U., Sunday School, Training Union, and 
W.M.U. organizations be requested to serve as promotional agencies 
to assist the General Secretary-Treasurer in promoting this collec- 
tion. 

98. The Board of Trustees of the Baptist Orphanage of North 
Carolina submitted through the Chairman of the Board, I. G. Greer, 
Chapel Hill, the Orphanage Report appearing at Section 148, Page 
161. Following his brief discussion he introduced Zeno Wall, 
Superintendent of the Orphanage, who made his first appearance 
before the Convention since he assumed superintendency and de- 
livered a strong message in support of the Orphanage program 
among North Carolina Baptists. 

99. "Christ is the Answer in Home Missions" was the topic of 
the next order with J. Roy Clifford, Lexington, presiding. He intro- 
duced John Caylor, Atlanta, Georgia, Representative of the Home 
Mission Board, who delivered the message of the hour. 

He was followed by James B. Turner, Laurinburg, who offered 
a special prayer in the interest of Home Missions. 

100. A. E. Lynch, Buies Creek, in behalf of the Music Committee 
submitted the following report and upon his motion it was adopted: 

REPORT OF THE MUSIC COMMITTEE 

That whereas the music for the Convention has been of high 
order, inspiring and worshipful, and 

Whereas Mr. John D. Holmes has made a good leader, and the 
choirs of our educational institutions have rendered splendid selec- 
tions, and 



of North Carolina 71 

Whereas the music in our churches has greatly developed and 
improved during the past few years, and 

Whereas it is the desire of our leaders to encourage good musical 
programs in the churches, 

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved; 

1. That we urge our Music Committee to continue the fine musical 
programs at the Convention, using the choirs of our institutions, 

2. That we urge our leaders to continue to carry on the summer 
assembly Music Conferences at Fruitland and Seaside Assemblies, 

3. That we express our deep appreciation to Mr. John D. Holmes 
for his fine leadership and to the directors and choirs of the various 
institutions which sang during the Convention. 

101. The Convention approved the motion by William Harrison 
Williams, Chairman, that the Recording Secretary and the General 
Secretary perfect the Journal. 

102. A Memorial Service was observed at this time with E. S. 
Summers, Concord, bringing to the attention of the Convention the 
names of those ministers who have died since the last session. The 
service closed with the audience standing in silent prayer after 
which Luther Little, Charlotte, prayed. 

103. The 1948 Annual was dedicated to the memory of the late 
W. D. Poe, Oxford, and L. R. Pruitt, Charlotte, for many years 
faithful ministers serving the Convention, upon the motion of M. L. 
Banister, Oxford. 

104. Recording Secretary Deane reported that final registration 
figures indicated that 1,439 messengers and 587 visitors had been 
enrolled. 

105. Prior to the closing message, President John W. Suttle ex- 
pressed to the Convention the honor and the pleasure that had been 
his to serve as President of the sessions of this the One Hundred 
Eighteenth Annual Session of North Carolina Baptists and re- 
joiced in the continued and outstanding progress of the State De- 
nominational Program and bade the messengers and North Carolina 
Baptists God Speed. 

106. The Convention was pleased to respond to a motion by 
Horace Easom, Shelby, as they stood in honor and recognition of 
the many years of faithful service of the beloved retiring Presi- 
dent. 

107. All business of the session having been completed, President 
Suttle introduced J. Clyde Turner, Raleigh, who after bringing a 
great message on the subject, "Christ is the Answer in Our 
Preaching," offered prayer and the 1948 Convention adjourned. 

John W. Suttle, President, 

Charles B. Deane, Recording Secretary. 



72 Baptist State Convention 

<&m Home #oerg 



ADAMS, J. Z Traphill 

BAINES, J. J ...Alarka 

BARNES, L. E _ Hiddenite 

BREWINGTON, M. L. Rowland 

CALDWELL, E. J North Belmont 

CHAMPION, R. C ...Tryon 

COREN, JUDSON. Lake Toxaway 

COTHREN, GRANT Traphill 

CREECH, A. R Princeton 

DeLOACH, B. F Swepsonville 

DEWEESE, R. L Salisbury 

FOSTER, J. H Wilmington 

GRIFFIN, WILLIAM M Alexander 

HARGROVE, B. H Waynesville 

Harrell, E. J Charlotte 

HICKMAN, GEORGE Winnabow 

HYDE, H. H. r .... Andrews 

JOHNSON, T. NEIL Chapel Hill 

LAWRENCE, W. F Union Grove 

LITTLE, T. P Marshville 

McDANIEL, T. C ...Connelly Springs 

MILLER, D. L. Lenoir 

MURRAY, J. T Winston-Salem 

MURRAY, L. B. ..State Road 

NEWTON, J. D Thomasville 

O'HARA, J. W Candler 

PEARSON, J. E Dobson 

POE, W. D Oxford 

RIMMER, HENRY CLAY Winston-Salem 

SESSOMS, J. B Magnolia 

SMITH, SIBBALD Cherokee 

WILSON, J. H ..Bryson City 



Note: We call attention to the fact that this list is made up 
from reports received from the Associational clerks. We make 
this explanation because we realize that there are perhaps 
many names that have not been included in the list. 



of North Carolina 73 



Program 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST PASTORS' CONFERENCE 

First Baptist Church 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

NOVEMBER 15, 1948 



Guy B. Funderburk, Presiding 
Stewart Simms, Directing Music 



MONDAY AFTERNOON 
Theme : The Shepherd and His Flock 

2:30 — Devotional - Mack M. Summey, Valdese 

2 : 45 — Announcements 

2:50 — The Shepherd's Problems: 

1. In the Rural Church W. I. Terrell, Oxford 

2. In the Industrial Church T. L. Cashwell, Gastonia 

3. In the City Church R. K. Benfield, Hickory 

3:35 — Open Forum 

3:50 — Business and Election of Officers 

4:05 — Hymn 

4:10 — The Shepherd's Care Wm. H. Williams, Charlotte 

4:40 — Adjourn 

MONDAY EVENING 

7:30 — Devotional ...Thomas L. Reece, Gardner-Webb College 

7:45 — "Other Sheep".... Dr. Ellen Winston, Raleigh 

8:15 — Music 

8:25 — The Shepherd's Message. ...James C. Cammack, Jr., Smithfield 

8:55 — Installation of New Officers 

9:00 — Adjourn 

Guy B. Funderburk, Oakboro, President 
Eph Whisenhunt, Clayton, Vice-President 
W. F. Woodall, Lenoir, Secretary 

Scripture: Ps. 23; Jer. 23:1-4; Ezek. 34; John 10:1-18; 21:15-17; 
Lk. 15:3-7. 



74 Baptist State Convention 



LIST OF MESSENGERS BY ASSOCIATIONS 

ALEXANDER (4) — Chas. E. Echerd, Fred W. Johnson, E. C. Shoe, R. H. Weaver, 
Taylorsville. 

ALLEGHANY (1)— F. G. Walker, Sparta. 

ANSON (13) — Mrs. H. B. Allen, Wadesboro; George W. Burch, Wingate; Rev. 
and Mrs. J. Max Cook, Lilesville; C. E. Crawford, Morven; Mrs. C. C. Green, 
T. Sloane Guy, Sr., T. Sloane Guy, Jr., Wadesboro; Mrs. L. W. Humphrey, 
Lilesville; Mrs. H. W. Little, Wadesboro; J. C. Meigs, H. V. Napier, Polkton; 
Lewis W. Williams, Wadesboro. 

ASHE (3) — R. R. Campbell, West Jefferson; Ira T. Johnston, Jefferson; Miss 
Virginia Dare Teague, West Jefferson. 

ATLANTIC (12) — John H. Bunn, Morehead City; M. Leslie Davis, Rev. and Mrs. 
Winfrey Davis, Beaufort; Thomas W. Fryer, Lillian Humphrey, New Bern; 
Albert S. Lamm, Pollocksville; G. T. Liner, Jacksonville; Lee A. Phillips, 
Marshallberg; Mr. and Mrs. N. C. Trott, Richlands; W. D. Williamson, Swans- 
boro. 

AVERY (5) — Rev. and Mrs. A. G. Brooks, Crossnore; Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Cost- 
ner, Mrs. C. W. Leca, Newland. 

BEULAH (9) — W. T. Baucom, Yanceyville; J. Boyce Brooks, Roxboro; W. B. 
Cone, Longhurst; Henry Crouch, Wake Forest; J. F. Funderburk, Miss Ella 
Sue Gravitte, Roxboro; Roy D. Keller, Danville, Va.; John C. Searcy, H. R. 
Starling, Roxboro. 

BLADEN (5) — D. T. Britt, Elizabethtown; Rev. and Mrs. Chas. P. Burchette, Jr., 
Bladenboro; A. D. Frazier, Elizabethtown; B. M. Glisson, White Oak. 

BLUE RIDE (12) — Carson Brittain, C. C. Cross, W. M. Dameron, Carl Mc- 
Kenney, M. O. Owens, Jr., C. C. Parker, E. W. Parker, Frank Robinson, Paul 
C. Stokes, Marion; Henry E. Walden, Jr., Old Fort; A. W. Wall, Fred G. 
Willis, Marion. 

BRIER CREEK (CO- 
BRUNSWICK (1) — W. R. Moorehead, Bolivia. 

BRUSHY MOUNTAIN (2) — W. N. Brookshire, Wilkesboro; John T. Wayland, 
North Wilkesboro. 

BUNCOMBE (40) — C. A. Abernethy, Rev. and Mrs. R. W. Abrams, W. B. Archer, 
Jack R. Bagwell, Asheville; H. W. Baucom, Black Mountain; Colonel D. 
Bessinger, Asheville; B. C. Blankeship, Swannanoa; A. J. Buckner, Asheville; 
C. J. Buice, Oteen; Mrs. Walter E. Clark, J. A. Cox, M. H. Cox, Dr. and Mrs. 
W. Perry Crouch, Asheville; Mr. and Mrs. William L. Hatcher, Ridgecrest; 
H. M. Hocutt, Asheville; Wilbur A. Honeycutt, Black Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. 
Charles Jollay, Swannanoa; Rev. and Mrs. Neils H. Larsen, H. R. Logan, 
Asheville; Paul Lovingood, Fairview; Carl G. Mauney, Enka; Perry Morgan, 
Ridgecrest; Everette Murray, Candler; Mr. and Mrs. George Pennell, Rev. 
and Mrs. C. F. Rogers, James H. Smith, Asheville; Rev. and Mrs. M. D. Smith, 
' Candler; Nane Starnes, Asheville; LeRoy Thomas, Biltmore; Mildred Thomas, 
Mrs. Ruth Wagoner, Don C. Young, Asheville. 

BURNT SWAMP (6) — Harvie Brewington, L. W. Jacobs, Anna Mae Locklear, 
Welton Lowry, Dawley Maynor, R. W. Maynor, Pembroke. 

CABARRUS (54) — G. F. Agee, Concord; Mrs. Ben Aycock, R. W. Bailes, Kan- 
napolis; Mrs. L. D. Barrier, Concord; Miss Doris Jeane Beck, Kannapolis; Ray 
Billings, Concord; Wayne Bragg, Douglas Branch, Miss Kathleen Coates, Kan- 
napolis; J. W. Connell, Concord; Rev. and Mrs. John P. Crouch, Kannapolis; 
Rev. and Mrs. T. B. Deese, C. L. Devine, Concord; Miss Carol Edgison, W. E. 
Entrekin, F. W. Gales, Kannapolis; R. F. Gardner, H. F. Goodwin, Concord; 
Mrs. J. R. Griffin, Kannapolis; R. J. Haigler, Concord; Rev. and Mrs. Virgil M. 



of North Carolina 75 

Hailey, Kannapolis; A. A. Hathcock, C. E. Herrin, Concord; J. W. Honeycutt, 
Mrs. Robert Howell, Kannapolis; Dwight H. Ives, Concord; R. C. James, Wade 
H. James, Kannapolis; Mrs. E. E. Kendrick, Mr. and Mrs. A. McCoy, Carl H 
McCoy, Concord; M. S. McLain, T. B. Martin, Kannapolis; H. G. Matheny, 
Concord; Miss Mildred Miller, Watt H. Penegar, Mrs. E. H. Poole, Kannapolis; 
H. A. Privette, Concord; Miss Lucille Riner, William Sandman, Kannapolis; 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Shropshire, Carl G. Sides, Concord; M. T. Solomon, Kan- 
napolis; T. C. Stallings, Concord; H. M. Stroup, Kannapolis; E. S. Summers, 
W. V. Tarlton, Concord; Z. L. Walters, Kannapolis; Miss Frances Winstead, 
Concord. 

CALDWELL (32) — H S. Benfield, Hudson; A. E. Blankenship, Mrs. J. E. Broy- 
hill, Miss Elizabeth Campbell, Lenoir; John E. Carter, Granite Falls; Frank 
Colburn, Rhodhiss; C. F. Cooke, J. E. Crump, Hudson; Rev. and Mrs. Philip 

D. Fletcher, Granite Falls; Thomas B. Flowe, Lenoir; Rev. and Mrs. G. A. 
Hamby, Grady H. Hamby, Granite Falls; Paul Hester, Hudson; George W. 
Hollar, Granite Falls; Rev. and Mrs. W. Walter Jones, Lenoir; W. F. Kerley, 
Granite Falls; Mrs. E. C. McCall, Mrs. W. M. McGlammery, Dr. and Mrs. 
Oscar R. Mangum, W. R. Moss, Mrs. F. F. Nifong, Lenoir; Fred C. Roberts, 
Granite Falls; Mrs. Lucie Rodwell, Mrs. R. J. Smith, M. W. Stallings, Lenoir; 
Paul N. Wilson, Morganton; W. F. Wcodall, Lenoir; Ray Yarborough, Granite 
Falls. 

CAROLINA (9) — J. C. Canipe, W. H. Davis, B. G. Henry, Hendersonville; F. M. 
Huggins, Saluda; N. A. Melton, Columbus, Finley M. Orr, Flat Rock; Otto 
Parham, Edneyville; N. B. Phillips, Hendersonville; C. E. Scarborough, Tryon. 

CATAWBA RIVER (21) — W. C. Bearden, Miss Louella Brown, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. B. Cook, Morganton; Rev. and Mrs. Bertis Fair, Valdese; Fred Forester, 
Drexel; E. M. Hairfield, Elbert F. Hardin, Morganton; Rev. and Mrs. M. I. 
Harris, T. W. Hearne, Valdese; L. G. Kee, Ray R. Linville, John D. McCready, 
Morganton; Earl J. Odom, Valdese; L. E. Snipes, J. O. Summerlin, Morgan- 
ton; Rev. and Mrs. Mack M. Summey, Valdese; C. R. Upton, Morganton. 

CHEROKEE (O)— 

CHOWAN (15) — J. R. Byerly, Elizabeth City; Rev. and Mrs. J. T. Byrum, Bel- 
haven; Rev. and Mrs. R. N. Carroll, Edenton; Charles W. Duling, Hertford; 
Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Finlator, Elizabeth City; W. C. Francis, Tyner; Caleb W. 
Goodwin, Jr., Spot; Miss Elizabeth Hutchins, Elizabeth City; Paul E. Lemons, 
Corapeake; C. M. Pegram, G. M. Singletary, Ronald E. Wall, Elizabeth City. 

COLUMBUS (13) — Rev. and Mrs. B. G. Bass, Fair Bluff; T. J. Batten, Hallsboro; 
Robert C. Foster, Whiteville; P. C. Gantt, Tabor City; A. M. Glisson, White- 
ville; Rev. and Mrs. Ernest W. Glass, Chadbourn; B. H. Laughridge, Paul 
Lemon, Whiteville; Robert C. Melton, Cerro Gordo; Herbert Noe, Lake Wacca- 
maw; M. M. Turner, Hallsboro. 

DAN VALLEY (10) — C. M. Beach, Spray; R. O. Bennett, Jr., Mayodan; S. B. 
Hagler, Leaksville; J. E. Kirk, Reidsville; H. Fletcher Lambert, Leaksville; 

E. T. Parham, Madison;Walter D. Turner, Reidsville; Dr. and Mrs. Carl V. 
Tyner, Mrs. P. P. Wilson, Leaksville. 

DOCK (0)— 

EASTERN (29) — Gilmer J. Beck, Warsaw; Rev. and Mrs. A. L. Benton, Kerr; 
L. R. Brock, Jr., Mount Olive; Rev. and Mrs. J. V. Case, Rose Hill; Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul L. Cashwell, Clinton; Mrs. Carrie B. Covington, Kerr; Rev. and 
Mrs. John W. Lambert, Mount Olive; Dr. and Mrs. Roy R. McCulloch, Clinton; 
Rev. and Mrs. Thos. W. McKneely, Magnolia; Mrs. R. H. Melvin, Kerr; Miss 
Mary Frances Moss, Mrs. Marvin Musselwhite, Clinton; Thomas L. Rich, Jr., 
Ingold; Mrs. J. S. Royal, Clinton; Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Skipper, Mount Olive; 
Lowell F. Sodeman, Clinton; Rev. and Mrs. G. Van Stephens, Warsaw; E. N. 
Teague, Faison; E. C. Watson, Ingold; Miss Pauline Williamson, Clinton; T. K. 
Woody, Calypso. 



76 Baptist State Convention 

ELKIN (8) — Rev. and Mrs. Howard J. Ford, Mrs. Reece Gilliam, Mrs. Earl James, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Myers, Mrs. S. A. Nichols, Elkin; J. D. Wyatt, State Road. 

FLAT RIVER (6) — M. L. Banister, Oxford; Rev. and Mrs. W. S. Caudle, Stovall; 
W. Isaac Terrell, Oxford; C. A. Upchurch, Raleigh; Roger E. Williams, Oxford. 

FRENCH BROAD (5) — Hoyt Blackwell, Mars Hill; O. S. Edmonds, Jr., Marshall; 
M. H. Kendall, Ralph M. Lee, John R. Link, Mars Hill. 

GASTON (72) — Miss Myrtle Abernethy, Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. Arlan A. 
Bailey, North Belmont; M. L. Barnes, V. Ward Barr, W. W. Black, J. N. Bow- 
man, P. T. Brock, C. E. Brock, L. E. Bookout, N. C. Carter, T. L. Cashwell, 
W. A. Costner, Gastonia; A. E. Cleamer, Lowell; Mrs Gladys Cloninger, Mc- 
Adenville; Mrs. A. G. Creasman, R. Love Dixon, Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. E. S. 
Elliott, Cherryville; C. V. Garner, East Gastonia; Mrs. J. D. Gardner, Mc- 
Adenville; Mrs. W. P. Gilliam, Gastonia; Mrs. George E. Greene, Mount Holly; 
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Hair, Gastonia; P. W. Hardin, Belmont; W. Luther Hawk- 
ins, Cherryville; J. B. Helton, Belmont; Mrs. W. G. Henson, Gastonia; P. A. 
Hicks, Lincolnton; Dr. and Mrs. E. V. Hudson, Cramerton; Hubert Huggins, 
Dallas; Mrs. L. M. Jenkins, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Kosanke, Gastonia; C. A. Line- 
berger, Alexis; Rev. and Mrs. T. A. Lineberger, Gastonia; Rev. and Mrs. Walter 
N. Long, Belmont; Miss Mary E. McCall, East Gastonia; Frank H. Malone, 
Gastonia; Julius Mahon, Belmont; Fred A. Mauney, Stanley; W. B. Null, Bel- 
mont; Rev. and Mrs. Wilson Padgett, Mrs. Lonnie Price, McAdenville; Mrs. 
Odell Rankin, Gastonia; O. B. Reel, Mount Holly; Miss Joyce Reep, Belmont; 
W. G. Rhinehardt, Mrs. B. P. Robinson, Z. W. Rotan, Gastonia; Miss Bessie 
Rumfelt, McAdenville; C. G. Rumfelt, Belmont; W. G. Russell, Mount Holly; 
A. C. Sams, Belmont; W. C. Sledge, Lowell; Mrs. E. B. Smith, Gastonia; Miss 
Miriam Smith, Cherryville; S. A. Stroup, Mount Holly; J. Ned Taylor, Bessemer 
City; J. L. Vipperman, Dallas; S. Guy Walker, Gastonia; Mrs. H. N. Webb, 
Tom Webb, Gastonia; R. M. White, Belmont; W. H. Whitlock, Candler; Mrs. 
W. L. Wiggins, Gastonia; Miss Cora Yount, Miss Florence Yount, Belmont. 

GREEN RIVER (15) — J. Frank Earley, Caroleen; R. B. Green, Tryon; L. D. 
Holt, Spindale; M. P. Howington, Union Mills; Irby B. Jackson, Rutherford- 
ton; Rev and Mrs. J. B. Jones, Forest City; L. D. Leppard, R. F. Mayberry, 
Mrs. W. W. Nanney, Rutherfordton; Miss Helen L. Roach, Spindale; Wade 
Ruff, Rutherfordton; Mrs. C. D. Thornton, Rev. and Mrs. J. D. Williams. 

HAYWOOD (11) — Miss Daphne Boone, Waynesville; Jarvis Brock, Hazelwood; 
Rev. and Mrs. L. G. Elliott, Waynesville; Rev. and Mrs. D. D. Gross, Clyde; 
A. J. Hutchins, Canton; M. L. Lewis, Hazelwood; Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Morgan, 
Waynesville; Horace L. Smith, Canton. 

JOHNSTON (13) — Mrs. Jesse Austin, Clayton; James C. Cammack, Smithfield; 
P. P. Hartsell, Middlesex; Mrs. B. A. Hocutt, Clayton; M. M. Johnson, Raleigh; 
J. L. Jones, Pine Level; Mrs. M. W. Knott, Mrs. J. W. Massey, Mrs. Troy 
Page, Clayton; C. W. Teague, Selma; Mrs. Turner Vinson, Eph Whisenhunt, 

Clayton; Mrs. J. E. Wilder, Raleigh. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN (63) — Mrs. C. L. Austell, Shelby; B. F. Austin, Kings 
Mountain; Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Ayers, Shelby; Rev. and Mrs. Smoot Baker, 
Grover; Mrs. Lewis J. Bailey, W. P. Biggerstaff, Jesse Blalock, Shelby; C. B. 
Bobbitt, Kings Mountain; J. A. Brock, D. Boyd Cannon, Shelby; J. R. Cantrell, 
Boiling Springs; R. B. Carpenter, Belwood; Mrs. Raymond Cline, Mr. and Mrs. 
Horace Easom, Shelby; Phil L. Elliott, Boiling Springs; Hugh Falls, Kings 
Mountain; Ben C. Fisher, Boiling Springs; T. W. Fogleman, Kings Mountain; 
W. T. Furr, Shelby; E. O. Gore, Kings Mountain; Mr. and Mrs. C. Rush Ham- 
rick, Mr. and Mrs. O. V. Hamrick, Hugh F. Harrill, Harlan Harris, Woodrow 
W. Harris, Shelby; Mrs. A. M. Hicks, Kings Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. E. B. 
Hicks, Shelby; J. L. Jenkins, Boiling Springs; A. M. Kiser, Waco; Mrs. Earl 
Ledford, O. S. Long, Mrs. E. C. McClain, Edwin Moore, Miss Eva Moore, 
Rev. and Mrs. L. C. Pinnix, Kings Mountain; Miss Sara Posey, Shelby; Earl M. 
Redding, Gastonia; Thomas L. Reece, Boiling Springs; Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence 
Roberts, Shelby; Miss Nell Seism, Miss Ruth Seism, Mrs. Thurman Seism, 



of North Carolina 77 

Kings Mountain; Rev. and Mrs. Ernest M. Smith, Mrs. H. Dixon Smith, Mrs. 
Rush Stroup, Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Suttle, Shelby; Forrest Teague, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. C. Teague, Kings Mountain; D. A. Tedder, Shelby; Mrs. John Wacaster, 
Cherryville; H. E. Waldrop, Shelby; Mrs. J. M. Walker, Boiling Springs. 

LIBERTY (43) — Rev. and Mrs. E. F. Baker, Winston-Salem; S. D. Baker, B. V. 
Broadway, Thomasville; Rev. and Mrs. D. P. Brooks, M. V. Carroll, Lexing- 
ton; J. H. Clark, Thomasville; Rev. and Mrs. J. Roy Clifford, Lexington; Miss 
Velva Daughtry, Thomasville; Mr. and Mrs. Carey J. Davis, High Point; Miss 
Shirley Davis, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Davis, Kernersville; D. W. Digh, Lexing- 
ton; Miss Mae Belle Doughton, Thomasville; C. C. Edinger, Southmont; J. D. 
Fraley, Thomasville; H. V. Kinney, Lexington; Chas. F. Leek, Thomasville; 
Bill Lohn, Lexington; Miss Sallie L. McCracken, A. L. McGee, Thomasville; 
C. C. Matheny, G. W. Miller, Lexington; Rev. and Mrs. B. A. Mitchell, Kern- 
ersville; E. E. Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Morgan, Lexington; D. W. Oldham, 
High Point; V. D. Phillips, Lexington; O. W. Rhodenhiser, Winston-Salem; 
E. C. Roach, Denton; Miss Roxie Sheets, Rev. and Mrs. N. C. Teague, Nolan 
Teague, Lexington; Dr. and Mrs. Zeno Wall, J. O. Walton, Thomasville. 

LITTLE RIVER (24) — C. D. Bain, Dunn; Leslie H. Campbell, Buie's Creek; Miss 
Lillian Draughon, Dunn; Alfred Dula, Kipling; Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Hodges, 
Dunn; Rev. and Mrs. Sam F. Hudson, Lillington; B. W. Jackson, Raleigh; 
Roger C. Johnson, Lillington; J. M. Long, Coats; A. C. McCall, Bunnlevel; 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McLeod, Dunn; Rev. and Mrs. Forest C. Maxwell, Erwin; 
R. E. Moore, Mamers; S. Lewis Morgan, Jr., Dunn; C. E. Ruffin, Broadway; J. E. 
Smith, Holly Springs; W. M. Thomas, Broadway; Mrs. George Upchurch, 
Dunn; T. H. Williams, Raleigh; Harry D. Wood, Jr., Angier. 

MACON (2) — Chas E. Parker, C. W. Potts, Franklin. 

MECKLENBURG (107) — Mrs. E. E. Abernethy, Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Abernethy r 
Mrs. Maude Abernathy, Charlotte; Charles P. Auten, Paw Creek; Coit Eugene 
Auten, Rev. and Mrs. Homer O. Baker, Charlotte; Mrs. A. C. Bumgardner, 
North Charlotte; Harry F. Bean, Mint Hill; R. G. Bennett, Cornelius; T. H. 
Biles, James P. Blackwelder, Rev. and Mrs. David E. Bobbitt, Claude U. 
Broach, Mrs. L. D. Brooks, Mrs. H. P. Bullock, Carolyn Bynum, Mrs. Drunette 
Caldwell, Miss Suzanne Carroll, W. L. Chapman, J. M. Crowe, Mrs. Carl Davis, 
Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Dawson, Miss Nancy Dickens, M. H. Drye, E. K. Echerd, 
Jr., Miss Lois Edinger, Ben F. Favell, H. L. Ferguson, Mr. and Mrs. John C. 
Fletcher, Jr., Charlotte; Mrs. Sanford L. Forbes, Matthews; Mrs. Ruth Fox, 
S. Q. Garrison, Mrs. T. Roach Garrison, Mrs. Nellie Godfrey, Miss Sarah 
Godfrey, Miss Peggy Greene, Cecil E. Gregory, Charlotte; L. B. Grey, Mid- 
land; David Gribble, W. O. Griffin, J. P. Hackney, Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. 
Hamrick, Geo. D. Heaton, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Guy Helms, W. H. Helms, Mrs. 
O. W. Herr, Mrs. Jos. T. Holder, Charlotte; Mrs. R. M. Houston, Matthews; 
James A. Hudson, Monroe; J. Clarence Jones, Newell; E. E. Kerley, Hunters- 
ville; H. C. Kissiah, John R. Knott, G. P. Lanier, Dr. and Mrs. Luther Little, 
Raymond Long, Edward Lovell, B. T. Lazenby, Charlotte; H. M. McGinnis, 
Pineville; Mrs. Bill Manson, John M. Medlin, Boyd P. Milburn, J. D. Moose, 
Mrs. J. E Morris, Mrs. T. C. Mullis, Charlotte; Hubert S. Mumford, Matthews; 
Mrs. Nina Nixon, Miss Pauline Owen, Charlotte; J. W. Parham, Huntersville; 
Mrs. J. D. Pate, Mrs. A. M. Patterson, Mrs. T. H. Plemmons, C. N. Peeler,. 
Mrs. C. B. Pope, Pat Price, C. W. Propst, Miss Betty Sue Reinhardt, J. Rector 
Robbins, Mrs. A. C. Roberts, Mrs. W. L. Robinson, Charlotte; Mrs. L. C. 
Rodgers, Matthews; Robert Rodwell, Mrs. George Lampley, Rev. and Mrs. 
A. G. Sargeant, Mrs. Sheller Smith, W. J. Smith, C. D. Spangler, Francis: 
Stogner, Mrs. Richard Turner, Dr. and Mrs. P. S. Vann, Mrs. C. L. Wall, C. C. 
Warren, William Harrison Williams, A. B. Wood, Otis A. Wright, Rev. and 
Mrs. J. Clyde Yates, Charlotte. 

MITCHELL (5) — Joseph B. Folds, Rev. and Mrs. D. C. Wesson, Miss Nancy R. 
Wesson, James O. Young, Spruce Pine. 

MONTGOMERY (4) — Paul J. Hopkins, Mount Gilead; Rev. and Mrs. Charles B. 
Trammel, Mrs. Barna Warner, Troy. 



78 Baptist State Convention 

MOUNT ZION (34) — Ernest W. Bailes, Oren Bradley, Durham; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. V. Brown, Haw River; Guy S. Cain, Graham; E. C. Chamblee, Burlington; 
R. A. Corbett, Mrs. L. A. Corbett, Mebane; Rev. and Mrs. W. V. Cox, Swep- 
sonville; T. Paul Deaton, Hillsboro; Miss Mary Ellen Ellis, Tom M. Freeman, 
C. D. Gattis, Burlington; I. G. Greer, Samuel T. Habel, Chapel Hill; C. H. 
Henderson, Saxapahaw; J. C. Herrin, Chapel Hill; L. H. Hollingsworth, 
Mebane; James M. Home, Elon College; Troy Jones, Carrboro; Miss Maude 
Kay, Howard Mullis, Luther A. Nail, Burlington; Floyd L. Paschall, Carlton 
S. Prickett, Burlington; J. Hampton Rich, Chapel Hill; C. H. Stanfield, Altama- 
haw; Mrs. V. C. Surratt, Burlington; C. L. Upchurch, Durham; John H. Vernon, 
Burlington; Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Wagoner, Chapel Hill; J. H. Waugh, Jr., 
Burlington. 

NEUSE (9) — E. Dean Bergen, La Grange; Miss Olivia Mayer, Goldsboro; Rev. 
and Mrs. Howard G. Dawkins, Miss Dorothy Elliott, Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Reed, 

Kinston; Rev. and Mrs. A. J. Smith, Goldsboro. 

NEW FOUND (0)— 

NEW SOUTH RIVER (17)— E. B. Booker, Rockfish; Rev. and Mrs. W. M. Chap- 
man, Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Dawkins, Fayetteville; Waldo D. Early, Roseboro; 
Rev. and Mrs. Louis S. Gaines, Walton B. Guthrie, George L. Hocutt, Rev. 
and Mrs. C. R. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Johnson, D. H. Lowder, John A. 
Oates, Fayetteville; Herman Warren, Dunn. 

PEE DEE (17) — A. R. Brothers, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Deane, J. T. Davis, 
Rockingham; B. E. Honeycutt, Cordova; Elbert N. Johnson, Wagram; O. W. 
McManus, Gibson; Ernest W. Moore, Mrs. Blanche Palmer, Rev. and Mrs. 
Edwin F. Perry, R. D. Riggins, Rockingham; E. C. Smith, Wagram; J. Marvin 
Smith, Rockingham; Dr. and Mrs. James B. Turner, Laurinburg; J. B. Willis, 
Hamlet. 

PIEDMONT (68) — W. C. Adkinson, Rev. and Mrs. H. T. Allred, Greensboro; 
I. F. Anderson, Pleasant Garden; Mrs. Ira F. Anderson, Greensboro; Neil J. 
Armstrong, High Point; Claud B. Bowen, Greensboro; Mrs. Raymond Camp- 
bell, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. W. E. Coates, Reidsville; Floy W. Cox, Jr., 
Guilford College; J. Ben Eller, R. F. Farley, F. L. Fraser, Miss Wilma Grass, 
Greensboro; W. C. Guth, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. A. S. Hale, High Point; 
C. M. Harrington, Rev. and Mrs. Ray W. Harrington, Greensboro; Miss Betsy 
Hopkins, Rev. and Mrs. Julian S. Hopkins, High Point; Mr. and Mrs. D. A. 
Kearns, Rev. and Mrs. R. Von King, Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Martin, Greensboro; 
Mrs. Harry Monroe, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. Donald G. Myers, Reidsville; 
Ward Ostrander, High Point; Miss Frances A. Privette, Reidsville; Lewis E. 
Rhodes, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. George Richman, High Point; S. L. Riddle, 
Greensboro; Woodrow W. Robbins, High Point; Miss Katherine Roddick, 
Reidsville; Mrs. J. B. Rumley, T. L. Sasser, Greensboro; Rev. and Mrs. John H. 
Scalf, C. M. Scott, High Point; R. C. Shearin, Greensboro; Mr. and Mrs. Junie 
Smith, Jr., Rev. and Mrs. R. L. Smith, High Point; R. T. Smith, Greensboro; 
W. L. Smith, High Point; Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Stubbs, Rev. and Mrs. James 
R. Thompson, Mrs. Chas. A. Tucker, James E. Wiggs, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. 
Wilkins, Greensboro; Lucien Williams, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. T. C. Wil- 
liams, Jr., Gibsonville; George E. Williamson, Wilson Woodcock, E. D. Young, 
Greensboro; S. R. Young, Pomona. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN (37) — Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Adams, W. Lawson Allen, Mrs. 
Floyd Carter, Rev. and Mrs. A. K. Cheek, Dr. and Mrs. Avery M. Church, L. 
Vernon Connell, Joseph A. Crews, Winston-Salem; Miss Agnes Cramer, King; 
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Early, Winston-Salem; C. N. Essex, Clemmons; Miss Kath- 
leen Frink, Winston-Salem; C. W. Glosson, Kernersville; W. R. Grigg, Rev. and 
Mrs. James M. Hayes, Dr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Herring, Winston-Salem; J. M. 
Johnson, Walnut Cove; W. K. McGee, M. E. Manuel, W. H. Moore, Winston- 
Salem; T. H. Parris, Pilot Mountain; W. E. Pettit, Miss A. Lucille Proctor, Mrs. 
J. A. Roddick, Winston-Salem; J. F. Stegall, Clemmons; John A. Settle, E. T. 
Sims, Glenn E. Swain, Burley S. Turner, Walter L. Warfford, Mrs. George 
Yarbrough, Albert A. Young, Winston-Salem. 



of North Carolina 79 

RALEIGH (77) — Mrs. H. W. Apple, Wendell; Lattye E. Arnold, Raleigh; A. L. 
Aycock, J. Glenn Blackburn, Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. Earle L. Bradley, 
T. W. Brewer, J. M. Broughton, G. W. Bullard, J. W. Bunn, Raleigh; R. A. 
Cadle, Apex; Carlyle Campbell, L. L. Carpenter, Raleigh; J. G. Carroll, Wake 
Forest, Rev. and Mrs. John L. Coley, Raleigh; Robert L. Costner, Victor S. 
Dowd, Knightdale; J. Allen Easley, Wake Forest; Mrs. Foy J. Farmer, Mr. 
and Mrs. Claude F. Gaddy, Raleigh; Rev. and Mrs. John U. Garner, Roles- 
ville; Harvey T. Gibson, J. E. Green, Raleigh; C. O. Greene, Cary; George J. 
Griffin, Owen F. Herring, Wake Forest; Rev. and Mrs. S. A. High, Garner; 
John D. Holmes, Miss Ethel Howard, M. A. Huggins, Raleigh; A. W. Icard, 
Henderson; Mr. and Mrs. Don R. Jackson, John W. Kincheloe, Jr., Raleigh; 
Thurman Kitchin, I. Beverly Lake, Wake Forest; Dennis M. Larkins, Raleigh; 
Marc H. Lovelace, Wake Forest; John H. McCrimmon, Zebulon; LeRoy Martin, 
Miss Ruth Miller, Raleigh; Carlton F. Mitchell, Zebulon; Miss Martha Jane 
Mitchell, F. O. Mixon, Raleigh; S. R. Moore, Cary; Henry A. Morgan, Wake 
Forest; Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Morgan, L. J. Morriss, Mrs. Myra S. Motley, Ra- 
leigh; J. Gray Murray, Cary; L. C. Newton, Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Newton, Jr., 
M. F. D. Newton, Raleigh; Homer I. Nichols, Neuse; Eugene Olive, Wake 
Forest; Rev. and Mrs. L. Bun Olive, Raleigh; W. M. Page, Fuquay Springs; 
Miss Ruth Provence, Mrs. James W. Ray, Raleigh; E. J. Rogers, Joe F. Roach, 
Wendell; W. A. Seagroves, Holly Springs; M. O. Sears, Cary; Mr. and Mrs. 
R. N. Simms, Raleigh; I. T. Stroud, Wake Forest; Dr. and Mrs. J. Clyde 
Turner, Raleigh; Cecil Watson, Youngsville; Wm. L. Wyatt, Raleigh. 

RANDOLPH (14) — John T. Biddle, Asheboro; Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Elam, Frank- 
linville; R. L. Hughes, Asheboro; John Ivan Kizer, Ramseur; Rev. and Mrs. 
Charles J. McBride, High Point; Rev. and Mrs. A. E. Madaris, H. K. Masteller, 
Asheboro; L. J. Rainey, Trinity; G. F. Settlemyre, Central Falls; H. T. 
Stevens, Mrs. Frank G. Toler, Sr., Asheboro. 

ROANOKE (59) — Rev. and Mrs. John Felix Arnold, Enfield; Mrs. John Ashford, 
Scotland Neck; Miss Emily S. Austin, Tarboro: Mrs. J. D. Baldree, Williams- 
ton; Clyde E. Baucom, Wilson; Rev. and Mrs. C. W. Bazemore, Scotland Neck; 
Norman L. Blythe, Rocky Mount; Rev. and Mrs. W. M. Cassell, Bethel; Rev. 
and Mrs. E. G. Cole, Farmville; R. L. Collins, Sharpsburg; G. N. Cowan, 
Rocky Mount; George W. Davis, Farmville; Mrs. George Dew, Wilson; Ralph 
E. Ferguson, Robersonville; C. Arthur Francis, Nashville; Mrs. W. H. Gay, 
Rocky Mount; W. F. Gentry, Momeyer; C. E. Godwin, Rocky Mount; W. E. 
Goode, Scotland Neck; W. C. Grant, Weldon; Wistar Hamilton, Washington; 
Rev. and Mrs. R. E. Hardaway, Greenville; W. B. Harrington, Williamston; 
Rev. and Mrs. P. C. Harris, Red Oak; Harold L. Hawkins, Spring Hope; Miss 
Esther W. Hollowell, Tarboro; Rev. and Mrs. E. W. Holmes, Farmville; Robert 
Lee Humber, Greenville; W. I. Johnson, Rocky Mount; Robert Joyner, Farm- 
ville; Mrs. Leland Kitchin, Scotland Neck; C. W. Kreamer, Halifax; Rev. and 
Mrs. Raymond Clyde Lanier, H. C. Lowder, Rocky Mount; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. D. Morris, Scotland Neck; Jack Neilson, Greenville; Paul B. Nickens, Ply- 
mouth; Carl Lee Ousley, Tarboro; Mrs. E. E. Richards, Rocky Mount; Rev. 
and Mrs. S. H. Roberts, Wilson; Rev. and Mrs. Stewart B. Simms, Williamston; 
E. R. Stewart, Hamilton; Mrs. Claude Thompson, E. Evans Ulrich, Wilson; Rev. 
and Mrs. C. S. Waters, Rocky Mount; Paul R. Waters, Washington; Rev. 
Marshall White-Hurst, Roanoke Rapids. 

ROBESON (23) — M. O. Alexander, Lake View, S. C; O. A. Anderson, Rowland; 
C. J. Ellis, Pembroke; J. M. Gibbs, James Gibbs, Stedman; E. L. Hedgepeth, 
C. P. Herring, Joel S. Johnson, Fairmont; Mr. and Mrs. George Leeper, Park- 
ton; E. P. Lockamy, Barnesville; Rev. and Mrs. Phillip J. McLean, Lumber- 
ton; J. C. McQueen, Jr., J. Lloyd Mauney, Red Springs; S. A. Rhyne, B. M. 
Sivley, William J. Southard, A. P. Stephens, Lumberton; W. R. Tyner, Lowe; 
L. R. Varser, Lumberton; Tom E. Walters, Parkton; George H. Wallan, Lum- 
berton. 

ROWAN (51) — Mrs. A. L. Abernathy, Rev. and Mrs. Zeb D. Baker, China Grove; 
Clay R. Barnes, Spencer; Mrs. Earle Blalock, Salisbury; F. P. Blankenship, 



80 Baptist State Convention 

Rockwell; Tom W. Bray, Salisbury; R. O. Brinkley, China Grove; Mrs. E. 
Carr Choate, Glenn Choate, Mrs. E. L. Calloway, Salisbury; Reeves C. 
Cline, Kannapolis; Rev. and Mrs. H. T. Davis, China Grove; Mrs. R. B. Davis, 
Salisbury; T. A. Dennis, China Grove; R. A. Ellis, Salisbury; Gene Funder- 
burk, Rockwell; Mrs. Perry Frye, Mrs. Peggy Hall, China Grove; Mrs. S. G. 
Hasty, Salisbury; Carl E. Helms, Gold Hill; Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Henderson, 
Spencer; D. L. Hendrix, W. T. Hendrix, L. A. Honeycutt, R. N. Huneycutt, 
J. L. Kirk, Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Kiser, Salisbury; Rev. and Mrs. W. A. Lauder- 
milch, Mrs. Odell Livengood, Spencer; Jack Lowder, Rev. and Mrs. E. L. 
Melton, O. D. Moore, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Myers, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Perkins, 
Miss Margaret E. Sills, Mrs. Ed Smith, Mrs. J. O. Sparks, Mrs. L. A. Steele, 
Mrs. J. A. Summers, Salisbury; Carl A. Talley, Kannapolis; Rev. and Mrs. 
W. T. Whittington, Faith; Edgar H. Wilmer, Spencer. 

SANDY CREEK (25) — Rev. and Mrs. K. E. Bryant, Pittsboro; E. W. Byerly, 
Bear Creek; Zeb A. Caudle, Aberdeen: Mrs. Colin Churchill, Siler City; G. W. 
Davis, Steeds; L. M. Dixon, Cameron; Rev. and Mrs. Yancey C. Elliott, Robert 
Gardner, Sanford; Rev. and Mrs. W. R. Cosnell, West End; Miss Harriett Jane 
Grosbeck, Sanford; J. Parks Hackney, Siler City; Rev. and Mrs. O. J. Hagler, 
Carthage; Victor R. Johnson, Pittsboro; E. H. Jordan, W. L. Lynch, Ralph 
McLean, Siler City; Roy A. Morris, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Overton, Sanford; 
R. F. Paschal, Siler City; Henry Powell, Sanford. 

SANDY RUN (23) — J. E. Bishop, Mooresboro; Rev. and Mrs. M. D. Blanton, 
F. E. Dabney, J. R. Featherston, Forest City; Rev. and Mrs. R. M. Hagler, 
Caroleen; N. C. Hamrick, Spindale; A. E. Harper, Bostic; M. H. Ingle, Forest 
City; John Keller, Spindale; Miss Isabelle Knott, Cliffside; C. F. Laughlin, 
Ellenboro; Tom S. Lawrence, Cliffside; Rev. and Mrs. J. L. McCluney, Henri- 
etta; W. F. McGinnis, Ellenboro; R. A. Pate, Bostic; Garvon Rhodes, Spindale; 
Keith Sherman, H. Hansel Stembridge, Jr., Forest City; Rev. and Mrs. Felix 
R. Wagner, Spindale. 

SOUTH FORK (56) — Mrs. Garland Abernethy, Hickory; Victor L. Andrews, 
Newton; Rev. and Mrs. Morris Baker, Boger City; Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Bandy, 
South Fork; R. Knolan Benfield, Latt Beshears, Hickory; A. F. Blackburn, 
Lincolnton; R. T. Boatwright, Conover; M. S. Brittain, Newton; Ben R. 
Coley, Gastonia; D. Eugene Couch, Lincolnton; Rev. and Mrs. J. R. Everett, 
J. H. Gilley, Maiden; Miss Elizabeth Granlee, Lincolnton; Ed Harrell, Newton; 
Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Hatfield, Hickory; H. L. Heffner, Lincolnton; Mrs. J .R. 
Helderman, Boger City; Fritz Hemphill, R. A. High, Hickory; L. F. Helder- 
man, Charlotte; Mrs. R. K. Hildebran, Hickory; Perry D. Huitt, T. C. John- 
son, Newton; W. C. Laney, Brookfield; Miss Hazel Leigh, Boger City; W. P. 
Lippard, Lincolnton; Mrs. James McAllister, Boger City; L. A. McClure, 
Alexis; R. G. Mace, Long Island; J. Ed Miller, Morganton; Miss Joyce Mullins, 
J. Louis Price, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. P. Pruitt, Hickory; Mrs. J. L. Putnam, 
W. W. Rimmer, T. H. Roach, Lincolnton; Ernest J. Sisk, Vale; E. F. Sullivan, 
Hickory; Alvin A. Walker, Newton; A. R. Waters, Catawba; Miss Betty June 
Weaver, Hickory; W. C. Weaver, Iron Station; G. S. Whisnant, Mrs. Dolores 
Williams, Mrs. J. P. Williams, George L. Willis, Lincolnton; Rev. and Mrs. 
R. L. Wilson, Wyman E. Wood, W. D. Yelton, Hickory. 

SOUTH MOUNTAIN (3) — J. David Goodwin, Hildebran; L. A. Miller, S. M. 
Stroupe, Connelly Springs. 

SOUTH YADKIN (36)— J. W. Allen, Mrs. Clyde Bell, Statesville; Mrs. T. J. 
Brooks, Mooresville; B. U. Christopher, R. R. Cook, Statesville; J. B. Cain, 
Cana; J. P. Davis, Mocksville; Rev. and Wendell G. Davis, Statesville; Mrs. 
Hilliard Freeze, Mooresville; Z. Miller Freeman, Harmony; Mrs. G. M. Flem- 
ing, Cleveland; Mrs. Maxine Germaine, Mooresville; S. R. Guy, Oscar S. 
Lambert, Mrs. J. C. Gryder, Statesville; Mrs. W. C. Hill, Troutman; Rev. and 
Mrs. J. C. R. Hendon, Mooresville; T. M. Hendrix, Mocksville; C. C. Holland, 
Statesville; Mrs. J. C. Jones, Mrs. Walter Johnson, Mooresville; Rev. and Mrs. 
J. Wayne Levan, Mrs. H. P. Montgomery, Miss Willa Marks, Rev. and Mrs. 



of North Carolina 81 

James S. Potter, Mrs. G. D. Pierce, Rev. and Mrs. Paul Reese, Statesville; 
G. L. Royster, Cooleemee; Mrs. A. T. Stoudemire, Cleveland; Worth Speaks, 
S. W. Tims, Statesville. 

STANLY (29) — Miss Sadie B. Allen, Norwood; O. H. Bolch, W. J. Bradley, 
U. S. Burleyson, Albemerle; Mrs. M. Y. Coggin, New London; John H. Con- 
nell, Concord; Norwood Davis, Albemarle; Mrs. R. E. Drye, Oakboro; L. W. 
Fields, New London; Guy B. Funderburk, Oakboro; L. H. Hankins, Norwood; 
Woodrow W. Hill, W. B. Holmes, Mrs. Rachel Holt, E. J. Honeycutt, Albe- 
marle; F. H. Hopkins, Norwood; J. Tillman Lake, Miss Edith Mauldin, B. 
Parker Miller, Albemarle; L. D. Munn, Badin; J. T. Palmer, New London; 
Spencer Pickler, Albemarle; Mrs. O. M. Rogers, Oakboro; W. J. Russell, Rev. 
and Mrs. J. A. Seymour, Alfred E. Staley, Albemarle; Mrs. T. V. Staton, New 
London; Mrs. T. F. Underwood, Albemarle. 

STONE MOUNTAIN (0) — 

STONY FORK (0) — 

SURRY (8) — Miss Hazel Brannock, Lonnie A. Fleming, Miss Sarah Lee Hagler, 
Mrs. John H. Midkiff, C. E. Otey, R. Carrington Paulette, Mount Airy; J. E. 
Pearson, Dobson; Everett W. Powers, Mount Airy. 

TAR RIVER (12) — Norman F. Arant, Spring Hope; R. E. Brickhouse, Warrenton; 
E. Norfleet Gardner, E. W. Greene, Henderson; Robert W. Greene, Warren- 
ton; Julian H. King, Littleton; Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Lanning, Norlina; J. C. 
Mitchell, Wake Forest; Lee Pridgen, T. H. Steen, Aubrey S. Tomlinson, 
Louisburg. 

TENNESSEE RIVER (2) — Miss Dorothy Edwards, S. L. Lamm, Bryson City. 

THREE FORKS (10) — Rev. and Mrs. W. G. Bond, Boone; Kent Brown, Blowing 
Rock; Miss Juanita Davis, C. J. Farthing, Boone; W. J. Farthing, Valle Crucis; 
Rev. and Mrs. Oscar J. Harris, Mrs. Alma Miller, Blowing Rock; C. O. Vance, 
Vilas. 

TRANSYLVANIA (5) — F. M. Barnes, Penrose; Floyd B. Clark, J. Howard Hall, 
Brevard; C. B. Rogers, Pisgah Forest; L. B. Vaughan, Brevard. 

TUCKASEIGEE (5) — B. S. Hensley, Sylva; Charles B. McConnell, Cullowhee; 
Hugh Monteith, Miss Pauline Snelson, C. M. Warren, Sylva. 

UNION (38) — L. P. Beck, Mr. and Mrs. Harold E. Brown, Wingate; B. S. Broome, 
Monroe; C. C. Burris, Wingate; Mrs. H. E. Copple, Monroe; M. T. Gales, J. T. 
Garland, Joe Griffin, Marshville; Mr. and Mrs. Joel W. Griffin, Floyd Helms, 
Monroe; Joe Lee Helms, Indian Trail; N. S. Joyner, Waxhaw; Mrs. H. M. 
Lilly, Wingate; B. B. Littleton, Monroe; A. C. Lovelace, Wingate; W. M. 
Lunday, Monroe; Mrs. W. M. Perry, Wingate; Clayton Pope, Wadesboro; 
Rommie Pierce, Wingate; J. C. Ray, Monroe; Rev. and Mrs. Z. G. Ray, Fred 
Sandusky, Wingate; Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Sanders, Monroe; Rev. and Mrs. 
David R. Shelton, Wingate; Trom M. Sherrin, Marshville; James M. Sigmon, 
Wingate; Mrs. Glenn W. Stewart, Marshville; C. F. Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. 
Earl H. Underwood, Wingate; J. N. Watson, Marshville; Mrs. Coleman Womble, 
Wingate; Ralph H. Yarborough, Monroe. 

WEST CHOWAN (20) — Rev. and Mrs. T. N. Cooper, Rich Square; Rev. and Mrs. 
R. L. Councilman, Windsor; Oscar Creech, Ahoskie; J. B. Dailey, Jackson; 
Fletcher Ford, Severn; H. B. Huggins, Windsor; Rev. and Mrs. John E. 
Lanier, Winton; Mrs. Gordon Maddrey, Ahoskie; W. B. Milne, Aulander; J. L. 
Powers, Windsor; Rev. and Mrs. George E. Reynolds, Aulander; Leon P. 
Spencer, Seaboard; Warren F. Taylor, Murfreesboro; Ernest C. Upchurch, 
Lewiston; P. T. Worrell, Colerain; Roy V. Young, Windsor. 

WEST LIBERTY (0) — 



82 Baptist State Convention 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (11)— Mrs. J. C. Ammons, Miss Ruth Bagwell, 
Mrs. Alvis L. Buchanan, Miss Addie Mae Cooke, Mr. and Mrs. Peyton G. Ivie, 
Murphy; Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Lunsford, Andrews; J. Alton Morris, Murphy; 
Rev. and Mrs. T. Earl Ogg, Andrews. 

WILMINGTON (29) — C. E. Brisson, Wilmington; Rev. and Mrs. L. Grady Burgiss, 
Jacksonville; James Crisp, Wilmington; J. Bryan Dosher, Kelly; Rev. and 
Mrs. George W. Dowd, J. D. Hobbs, Fred L. Kelly, T. H. King, Rev. and Mrs. 
G. Carl Lewis, Rev. and Mrs. Charles A. Maddry, Guy C. Moore, Miss Mar- 
garet Parks, Rev. and Mrs. E. W. Pate, Wilmington; W. E. Pope, Holly Ridge; 
Rev. and Mrs. William A. Poole, Burgaw; Rev. and Mrs. R. K. Redwine, 
Winston-Salem; Rev. and Mrs. W. J. Stephenson, Miss Evelyn Straughan, 
Wilmington; Ben B. Ussery, Carolina Beach; E. C. Watson, Jr., Teachey; Miss 
Orma Jean Willis, Wilmington. 

YADKIN (10) — Rev. and Mrs. J. G. Allgood, Yadkinville; Rev. and Mrs. A. C. 
Cheshire, Mocksville; Mrs. D. H. Craver, Boonville; Mrs. J .W. Garner, 
Hamptonville; Mrs. T. E. Grigg, E. W. McMurray, Yadkinville; Rowland S. 
Pruette, Boonville; A. J. Steelman, Yadkinville. 

YANCEY (0) — 

YATES (29) — Henry B. Anderson, Wallace O. Andrews, Mrs. M. R. Blackmon, 
Leo T. Bridges, Durham; C. E. Byrd, Apex; W. Bryant Carr, Warren Carr, 
Trela D. Collins, Truett Cox, Miss Elizabeth Draughon, John T. Edwards, Mrs. 
I. S. Eubanks, Alfred F. Gibson, H. G. Hammett, John H. Knight, Mr. and 
Mrs. Beverly Lake, Judson Lennon, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Markham, Rev. and 
Mrs. B. E. Morris, Mrs. J. L. Ramsey, C. N. Royal, W. E. Stanley, Miss Bessie 
Strange, Z. B. Teel, Claude W. White, Franklin W. Young, Durham. 

Total Messengers: 1,431. 

VISITORS (599) — Avery L. Abernathy, China Grove; E. E. Abernethy, Charlotte; 
Mrs. F. H. Abernethy, Mount Holly; John A. Abernathy, China-Taisang, W. W. 
Abernethy; Miss Jewell Adams, Holly Springs; Randall Adams, Vanceboro; 
Mrs. W. N. Adams, Charlotte; Rev. and Mrs. W. T. Adams, King; M. L. Adair, 
Newton; Miss Edith Allen, Warrenton; Miss Peggy Allen, Lenoir; Mrs. Thos. 
D. Allen, Charlotte; Albert Ambrose, Wake Forest; Mrs. Herbert Andrew, 
Siler City; Mrs. J. B. Anderson, Mount Holly; Mrs. H. M. Austin, Albemarle; 
George Badgett, King; Yates Bagwell, Forest City; Joe Baker, China Grove; 
Joe Baker, Charlotte; Max Baldwin, Ramseur; P. S. Barber, Gastonia; Mrs. 
Clay Barnes, Spencer; J. A. Bass, Charlotte; Richard F. Bass, Wake Forest; 
Miss Virginia Beall, Kannapolis; Roy R. Beck, Salisbury; W. H. Beck, Lexing- 
ton; Buddy Bell, Durham; Mrs. L. L. Benson, Kings Mountain; J. B. Benton, 
Jr., Mrs. J. B. Benton, Benson; Mrs. B. L. Berry, Charlotte; Miss Martha Big- 
gers, Mars Hill; Mrs. T. H. Biles, Charlotte; Mrs. I. H. Blair, Monroe; Miss 
Mollie Blalock, Albemarle; Mrs. F. F. Blankenship, Rockwell; Charles Blan- 
ton, Forest City; Mrs. J. L. Blythe, Harrellsville; John Bobo, Mars Hill; Mrs. 
Hubert Boney, Teacheys; Miss Martha Boone, Wake Forest; A. J. Borders, 
Hickory; Mrs. Basil M. Boyd, Charlotte; Mrs. D. F. Boyd, Charlotte; Grier 
Bradshaw, Wingate; Clyde Brafford, Gastonia; Miss Emma Elizabeth Brauer, 
Ridgeway; Mrs. C. N. Bray, Siler City; Mrs. Gerald Bridges, Wake Forest; 
Johnnie Lee Brigman, Mars Hill; Miss Mary Lee Britt, Whiteville; Darnell 
Brittain, Newton; Miss Mary Broome, Wake Forest; Allen R. Brown, Hender- 
sonville; Harvey Brown, Charlotte; J. Harrell Brown, Asheville; Miss Tressie 
Brown, Statesville; Wade E. Brown, Boone; Mrs. H. D. Browning, Monroe; 
James R. Bryant, Charlotte; Mrs. J. S. Buchanan, Wendell; J. D. Bullard, 
Chadbourn; Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Burch, Charlotte; Allen Burris, Mrs. C. C. 
Burris, Wingate; Walter M. Byers, Troutman; R. D. Byrd, Albemarle; G. T. 
Cabiniss, Shelby; Wm. J. Crain, Cary; Charlie Caldwell, Charlotte; M. D. 
Caldwell, Jr., East Gastonia; Miss Patsy Well Cannon, Kipling; Mrs. C. C. 
Canaday, Benson; Mrs. T. E. Carlan, Monroe; Irving E. Carlyle, Winston- 
Salem; Hayden M. Cartner, Kannapolis; Miss Mary Leila Carvile, Roxboro; 



of North Carolina 83 

H. V. Couch, Elkin; Mrs. A. D. Caudle, Albemarle; Mrs. Butler Chapman, 
Taylorsville; Miss Daisy Chatham, Kannapolis; Miss Frances Chesson, Eden- 
ton; Mrs. J. G. Chapman, North Wilkesboro; Georgie Claiborne, South Hill, 
Va.; Mrs. Marvin Clark, Mount Holly; Miss Beverly Jeanne Cline, Miami, Fla.; 
Miss Doris Cline, Valdese; Miss Cora Coble, Oakboro; Jack Franklin Coffey, 
Mars Hill; Mr. and Mrs. Elwood Coggin, Fayetteville; F. W. Collins, Kannap- 
olis; L. Ed Collins, Mars Hill; Otis Colston, Buie's Creek; F. L. Colton, T. W. 
Colton, Bostic; Miss Gettie